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BUSINESS
January 24, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. is laying off 2,300 employees in its Sam's Club division as it tries to make its workforce leaner. In total, 2% of the 116,000 Sam's Club employees in the U.S. will lose their jobs. Employees were being informed of the layoffs Friday, spokesman Bill Durling said. Sam's Club, a membership-based warehouse chain in the mold of Costco, said nearly half the cuts will affect salaried assistant managers. In the fresh goods area, where previously there were six separate assistant managers, now three more senior and better-paid managers are to oversee a meat and deli block, a grocery and produce section and a bakery and cafe segment.
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BUSINESS
January 24, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. is laying off 2,300 employees in its Sam's Club division as it tries to make its workforce leaner. In total, 2% of the 116,000 Sam's Club employees in the U.S. will lose their jobs. Employees were being informed of the layoffs Friday, spokesman Bill Durling said. Sam's Club, a membership-based warehouse chain in the mold of Costco, said nearly half the cuts will affect salaried assistant managers. In the fresh goods area, where previously there were six separate assistant managers, now three more senior and better-paid managers are to oversee a meat and deli block, a grocery and produce section and a bakery and cafe segment.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 1993
GTE California, the largest employer in Thousand Oaks, said it signed a 39-month contract with the Communications Workers of America, which represents most of the phone company's 12,000 hourly employees. GTE said the contract, which takes effect immediately, calls for general wage increases of about 10% over the next three years and makes hourly employees eligible for additional incentives of up to 1.8% in 1995 and 3% in 1996, based on productivity factors.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Target said Friday that it plans to hire 70,000 workers for the holiday season, 20% fewer than it did last year. The decline from the 88,000 workers brought on board last year to handle the annual throngs of shoppers was intended to give existing employees first crack at extra work time, the company said through a spokesman. Overtime adds up during the season, between the early opening hours of Black Friday and the last minute gift-buying rush just before Christmas. Clocking longer shifts could mean a substantial paycheck boost for hourly workers.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2010 | From Reuters
McDonald's Corp. may cut health insurance for nearly 30,000 hourly workers in the U.S. unless federal regulators waive a requirement of the new healthcare law. The restaurant chain is at odds over the law's stipulation that "mini-med" insurance plans, which provide limited benefits, spend at least 80% of premium revenue on medical care, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing a company memo. McDonald's told federal regulators it would be "economically prohibitive" for its insurance carrier to continue to cover hourly workers unless it receives a waiver excluding it from the 80% requirement, the memo said.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2013 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
For years, politicians and labor unions have pilloried Wal-Mart and other large employers for paying workers so little that many qualify for government health insurance at taxpayers' expense. Now critics fear the public will get stuck with an even bigger tab as California and other states expand Medicaid as part of the federal healthcare law. That has California lawmakers taking aim at the world's largest retailer and other big firms. Legislators, backed by unions, consumer groups and doctors, are calling for fines that could reach about $6,000 per full-time employee who ends up on Medi-Cal, the state Medicaid program for the poor and others.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Big Three Auto Makers to Idle 22,350 Workers: The auto makers said they will idle the hourly workers next week because of continued weakness in new car and truck sales. Ford Motor Co. said it will idle assembly line workers at Michigan assembly plants in Wayne and Dearborn and in Edison, N.J. A spokeswoman for Ford said about 5,800 hourly workers are affected by the temporary two-week shutdowns. Chrysler Corp. said it will idle 3,300 hourly workers in Newark, Del. General Motors Corp.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chrysler Plans White-Collar Bonuses: Unlike rivals General Motors Corp. and Ford Motor Co., Chrysler Corp. will pay its white-collar workers $600 bonuses this year, matching payments to hourly workers. The bonuses to the 19,000 salaried workers will cost the No. 3 auto maker $11.4 million. Each of the Big Three will pay their hourly workers the bonus. GM and Ford suspended payments to salaried workers to save money.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
GTE Unit to Lay Off 300: GTE California said it will lay off 300 hourly workers and is offering early retirement and buyout packages to another 5,328 workers. The moves are part of a national cost-cutting program by GTE's parent company, Stamford, Conn.-based GTE Corp. The parent is offering early retirement or buyouts to about 26,000 management employees across the country, said Dan Smith, a spokesman for the California subsidiary.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ford to Temporarily Close 7 Assembly Plants: About 13,000 hourly workers at Ford Motor Co. will get an unscheduled vacation this week when the auto maker shuts down seven of its 14 assembly plants nationwide. Contracts negotiated between Ford and the United Auto Workers union provide laid-off workers with up to 95% of their pay. A Ford spokesman said the workers would be back on the job by next Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
Los Angeles police arrested 21 people who were part of rally and march downtown to call for better wages and improved working conditions at Wal-Mart stores. The protest drew people who chanted and waved signs that read "Pay us Enough to Support our Families" and "Illegally Fired for Standing Up. " The 21 protesters were arrested on suspicion of failure to disperse near Broadway and Cesar Chavez Avenue, said Los Angeles Police Department Officer Nuria Vanegas. Police did not have an estimate on how many protesters took part in the event.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Half of small businesses said they would cut full-time employee's hours or replace them with part-time workers in order to avoid paying for health insurance under President Obama's healthcare law, according to a recent survey from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Despite the Obama Administration's one-year delay of the employer mandate to 2015, small businesses said it would negatively affect their staff, and only 30% said they were prepared for its implementation. Because of the healthcare law, about 27% intend to cut hours to reduce full-time employees, 24% plan to reduce hiring and 23% expect to reduce full-time staffers with part-time workers to avoid having to comply with the mandate.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2013
A California proposal to fine large companies that have workers on Medi-Cal came up short in an initial vote in the Assembly amid strong business opposition. The proposed fines could reach about $5,000 per full-time employee who receives Medi-Cal, the state Medicaid program for the poor. The bill, AB 880, garnered 46 votes in the 80-member chamber Thursday, short of the 54 votes, or two-thirds majority, needed. The measure could come up for reconsideration as early as next week.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2013 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
For years, politicians and labor unions have pilloried Wal-Mart and other large employers for paying workers so little that many qualify for government health insurance at taxpayers' expense. Now critics fear the public will get stuck with an even bigger tab as California and other states expand Medicaid as part of the federal healthcare law. That has California lawmakers taking aim at the world's largest retailer and other big firms. Legislators, backed by unions, consumer groups and doctors, are calling for fines that could reach about $6,000 per full-time employee who ends up on Medi-Cal, the state Medicaid program for the poor and others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2011 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
The California Supreme Court, considering a case that will affect meal and rest breaks for all non-unionized hourly workers, appeared inclined Tuesday to give employees flexibility in choosing whether to take scheduled breaks. The state high court heard arguments in a potential class action lawsuit that is expected to clarify labor requirements for meal and rest breaks. Lawyers for workers in a wide array of industries have swamped the courts with such suits, leaving employers anxious for the state high court to resolve uncertainties in the law. "In L.A. Superior Court, virtually every day there is at least one and usually more" class action suits over work breaks, said Century City lawyer Scott Witlin, who represents employers and watched Tuesday's hearing, broadcast on cable television and the Internet.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2010 | From Reuters
McDonald's Corp. may cut health insurance for nearly 30,000 hourly workers in the U.S. unless federal regulators waive a requirement of the new healthcare law. The restaurant chain is at odds over the law's stipulation that "mini-med" insurance plans, which provide limited benefits, spend at least 80% of premium revenue on medical care, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing a company memo. McDonald's told federal regulators it would be "economically prohibitive" for its insurance carrier to continue to cover hourly workers unless it receives a waiver excluding it from the 80% requirement, the memo said.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Monday vetoed a pair of bills aimed at curbing theft by employers of wages paid to hourly workers. The most controversial of the two measures, backed by the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation, would have created a new misdemeanor crime for employers that willfully fail to pay all wages within 90 days after a worker leaves. A second bill would have increased the maximum amount of damages that a worker could be awarded in a wage-related legal dispute or state enforcement action.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A United Auto Workers official said General Motors Corp. was moving to reduce its factory workforce by offering early retirement and buyout packages to all U.S. hourly workers represented by the union. The official said the offers of $20,000 in cash and a $25,000 voucher to buy a vehicle were made by e-mail to local union officials. The official asked not to be identified because not all workers had been notified. Meanwhile, a union official said Chrysler already was offering buyout and early retirement packages to hourly workers in an effort to replace them with new hires who would earn less money.
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