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House Arrest

NATIONAL
May 21, 2011 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
Dominique Strauss-Kahn is out of jail, but instead of living under house arrest in a ritzy Manhattan apartment building that his wife had secured for him, the former head of the International Monetary Fund will stay downtown while he faces charges of sexually assaulting a chambermaid. Neighbors on the Upper East Side didn't want Strauss-Kahn in the building, so he'll stay temporarily in a corporate suite near the World Trade Center site owned by the security company he has hired, at $7,000 a day, to guard him. Strauss-Kahn's wife, Anne Sinclair, had rented an apartment in the Bristol Plaza on East 65th Street.
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NATIONAL
May 20, 2011 | By Geraldine Baum and Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Shorn of his job and much of his reputation, Dominique Strauss-Kahn is expected to walk out of jail Friday and into house arrest after a judge approved $1-million bail and $5-million bond while the French political celebrity fights charges that he sexually assaulted a hotel chambermaid. Prosecutors said Thursday that a grand jury had voted to press charges against Strauss-Kahn, the former head of the International Monetary Fund who had been considered a leading contender to be the next president of France, on four felony counts and three misdemeanors stemming from a weekend incident at the Sofitel hotel in New York.
WORLD
December 5, 2010 | A Times Staff Writer
In the decaying lakeside mansion where Aung San Suu Kyi spent much of the last two decades under house arrest, the Myanmar opposition leader and Nobel laureate was forbidden to use the Internet or the telephone or to watch satellite TV. She did, however, have two maids, was free to read newspapers and listen to radio, and had access to a doctor. For the other 2,200 or so political prisoners in Myanmar, conditions are quite different. Sentenced to impossibly long prison terms for speaking out against the repressive military government, they face torture, barely edible food, little or no medical care and years in solitary confinement.
WORLD
November 13, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
For years in her native Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi has been known simply as "The Lady," a pro-democracy stalwart and Nobel Peace Prize laureate who has languished for years in an arbitrary solitary confinement imposed by the nation's ruling military junta. Although she was snatched from the public limelight, residents of the former Burma have always known this about the charismatic Buddhist activist, now 65: She would not be broken by the military generals she has long defied. On Saturday, Suu Kyi proved them all right.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Bruce Karatz, whose 20-year run as chief executive of home-building giant KB Home was derailed by allegations that he manipulated the value of stock options, was sentenced Wednesday to five years' probation, including eight months of house arrest. U.S. District Judge Otis D. Wright II also fined the former executive $1 million and ordered him to perform 2,000 hours of community service. Wright rejected prosecutors' request for a lengthy prison sentence, noting that there was no evidence that the crimes damaged KB Home or its shareholders.
WORLD
November 5, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
The notes from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to European ambassadors posted in Norway referred to the Nobel Peace Prize awarded last month to imprisoned writer Liu Xiaobo. "We strongly hope that your country ? will refrain from attending any activity directed against China," read the notes, according to a diplomatic source who ? like most people involved with the issue ? did not wish to be quoted by name because of fear of Chinese retaliation. Behind the stilted language, the meaning was clear: Beijing was lobbying European governments to not attend the Dec. 10 awards ceremony honoring Liu, a dissident whom Chinese officials have denounced as a criminal.
WORLD
October 11, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
In the first whisper of a comment since he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize 48 hours earlier, imprisoned Chinese writer Liu Xiaobo sent word through his wife Sunday that he would dedicate the award to activists killed during 1989 pro-democracy demonstrations at Tiananmen Square, according to a human rights organization. The writer's wife, who has been held under house arrest, was escorted by police to Jinzhou Prison in northern China's Liaoning province where she was able to speak with her husband.
WORLD
July 12, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Oscar-winning film director Roman Polanski will not be extradited to the United States to face sentencing for having sex with a 13-year-old girl more than 30 years ago, Swiss authorities announced Monday. The Swiss Federal Department of Justice and Police said a flaw in the U.S. extradition request could not be ruled out and that Polanski, who maintains a vacation home in Switzerland, could reliably expect not to be arrested and deported since the U.S. knew of his frequent presence there over the past few years but never acted on it. Polanski, 76, has already been released from house arrest, the justice department said.
WORLD
July 12, 2010 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Oscar-winning film director Roman Polanski will not be extradited to the United States to face sentencing for having sex with a 13-year-old girl more than 30 years ago, Swiss authorities announced Monday. The Swiss Federal Department of Justice and Police said the U.S. had failed to turn over certain documents requested by the Swiss. The department also said Polanski, who maintains a vacation home in Switzerland, could reliably expect not to be arrested and deported because the U.S. knew of his frequent presence there over the last few years but never acted on it. Polanski, 76, has already been released from house arrest, the justice department said.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2010 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
One of 11 people charged with being part of a Russian spy ring told investigators that his loyalty to his handlers exceeded his commitment to his own son, prosecutors said Thursday as they argued against releasing the defendants on bond and warned that evidence unveiled so far was "the tip of an iceberg." Three of the accused spies appeared in federal court in Manhattan before Magistrate Ronald L. Ellis, who denied bail for a couple who went by the names Richard and Cynthia Murphy.
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