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November 26, 1988 | From Reuters
The government said Friday that it would not call in its monopolies panel to examine a controversial 1985 takeover of the firm that owns London's famous Harrods department store by three Egyptian-born brothers. But it added that a long-awaited report by government inspectors on the takeover of House of Fraser PLC would not be published until the police's Serious Fraud Office had completed its own investigations into the case.
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BUSINESS
November 26, 1988 | From Reuters
The government said Friday that it would not call in its monopolies panel to examine a controversial 1985 takeover of the firm that owns London's famous Harrods department store by three Egyptian-born brothers. But it added that a long-awaited report by government inspectors on the takeover of House of Fraser PLC would not be published until the police's Serious Fraud Office had completed its own investigations into the case.
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BUSINESS
February 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Less than 24 hours after voters in Aspen, Colo., rejected a ban on the sale of wild animal furs, one of the world's most famous department stores said it would close its fur salon because of public opposition to the killing of animals. Harrods, the luxury London department store, said Wednesday that it is closing its fur salon that has sold minks to the rich and famous for nearly a century.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Al Fayed brothers lied during their successful 1985 takeover of Harrods' owner, House of Fraser PLC, the government said today. "They repeatedly lied to us about their family background, their early business life and their wealth," according to a 752-page report by the Department of Trade and Industry.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1991 | This story was reported by Times staff writers Bob Drogin in Manila, Juanita Darling in Mexico City, Joel Havemann in Brussels, Leslie Helm in Tokyo, Jeff Kaye in London, William R. Long in Santiago, Chile, and Mary Williams Walsh in Toronto. It was compiled by staff writer Martha Groves in San Francisco
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