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House Scaling

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How much is a live performance of "The Music of Andrew Lloyd Webber" worth on the free market? It depends on where you sit and in what city. If you're planning to catch the show at the Universal Amphitheatre on June 20, 21 or 22, tickets are going for $32.50. But if you take in the same show at the Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre on June 23 or 24, the price of a seat can reach as high as $252.25.
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NATIONAL
December 18, 2004 | Joel Havemann, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration nudged its economic forecast slightly downward Friday in the first preview of the numbers that will be in the 2006 budget presented to Congress early next year. Its new forecast was in line with the consensus of private economists. The administration's new economic projection showed inflation-adjusted economic growth of 3.5% in 2005, the same growth rate as the average foreseen by 53 private economists who were surveyed Dec. 1 and 2 by Blue Chip Economic Indicators.
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NEWS
July 29, 1991
TOP DOLLAR: On the ticket price front, the Pacific continues to experiment with "scaling the house," in which the best seats go for significantly higher prices. . . . Tickets for the Sept. 13 concert by Rod Stewart top out at $65, dropping to $19.25 for a spot on the lawn. . . .
NATIONAL
June 8, 2004 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Louisiana's campaign to launch a $14-billion program to save the state's coast and marshlands is in jeopardy after the White House set aside its request for a 30-year engineering project to stem widespread erosion. The White House has countered with a short-term, scaled-back version of the plan. The details are still being worked out, but state officials say the Bush administration is expected to propose spending less than $1 billion over 10 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Whether convenience fees rise as a result of Ticketmaster's expected acquisition of Ticketron, insiders predict that the base price of concert tickets is certain to soar in the years ahead. Venues, promoters and ticket agents aren't the only ones responsible for pushing the price of tickets up these days. Artists are also demanding more money.
NEWS
October 4, 1986 | ELEANOR CLIFT, Times Staff Writer
White House officials, concerned that expectations for the scheduled superpower meeting in Iceland next weekend may be too high, said Friday that President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev may not conclude their two-day session with a joint statement, as they did at the Geneva summit last year. In addition, the officials say, there is only "an outside possibility" that the two leaders will set a firm date for a full-scale summit in Washington later this year or early next.
NEWS
January 28, 1993
The Los Angeles City Council's planning and land use management committee voted Tuesday to scale down a controversial proposal to build a housing project for low-income seniors in Echo Park. The committee approved a 49-unit project, 14 fewer units than the Los Angeles City Planning Committee recommended last August. The developer, the nonprofit Chinese Community Service Center, originally requested permission to build an 86-unit housing project on the one-acre site.
NEWS
March 6, 1986 | United Press International
The House today approved a scaled-down deficit-reduction bill that would save $6.9 billion this year and keep the current cigarette tax, release offshore oil revenues and press the states to raise the drinking age to 21. The measure faces an uncertain fate in the Senate and a possible veto if it reaches the White House as written.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2004 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Louisiana's campaign to launch a $14-billion program to save the state's coast and marshlands is in jeopardy after the White House set aside its request for a 30-year engineering project to stem widespread erosion. The White House has countered with a short-term, scaled-back version of the plan. The details are still being worked out, but state officials say the Bush administration is expected to propose spending less than $1 billion over 10 years.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2004 | Joel Havemann, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration nudged its economic forecast slightly downward Friday in the first preview of the numbers that will be in the 2006 budget presented to Congress early next year. Its new forecast was in line with the consensus of private economists. The administration's new economic projection showed inflation-adjusted economic growth of 3.5% in 2005, the same growth rate as the average foreseen by 53 private economists who were surveyed Dec. 1 and 2 by Blue Chip Economic Indicators.
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of fruitless partisan bickering, the House on Thursday overwhelmingly approved a stripped-down bill to bolster the economy by providing new unemployment benefits and modest business tax breaks, including one eagerly sought by the high-technology industry. The Democratic-controlled Senate is expected to pass the bill today, and President Bush said he would sign it. Congressional debate over how to strengthen the economy has raged for so long that it may have outlasted the recession.
NEWS
January 28, 1993
The Los Angeles City Council's planning and land use management committee voted Tuesday to scale down a controversial proposal to build a housing project for low-income seniors in Echo Park. The committee approved a 49-unit project, 14 fewer units than the Los Angeles City Planning Committee recommended last August. The developer, the nonprofit Chinese Community Service Center, originally requested permission to build an 86-unit housing project on the one-acre site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years after helping defeat a similar proposal, a Lake View Terrace homeowner group on Thursday endorsed plans to convert an empty hospital into a drug rehabilitation center in return for numerous security, lighting and landscape improvements. Leaders of the Lake View Terrace Home Owners Assn. said at a news conference that they now support plans to turn the vacant Lake View Medical Center into a 150-bed residential treatment center for teen-age drug and alcohol abusers.
NEWS
July 29, 1991
TOP DOLLAR: On the ticket price front, the Pacific continues to experiment with "scaling the house," in which the best seats go for significantly higher prices. . . . Tickets for the Sept. 13 concert by Rod Stewart top out at $65, dropping to $19.25 for a spot on the lawn. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How much is a live performance of "The Music of Andrew Lloyd Webber" worth on the free market? It depends on where you sit and in what city. If you're planning to catch the show at the Universal Amphitheatre on June 20, 21 or 22, tickets are going for $32.50. But if you take in the same show at the Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre on June 23 or 24, the price of a seat can reach as high as $252.25.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS and JIM WASHBURN
Whether convenience fees rise as a result of Ticketmaster's expected acquisition of Ticketron, insiders predict that the base price of concert tickets is certain to soar in the years ahead. Venues, promoters and ticket agents aren't the only ones responsible for pushing the price of tickets up these days. Artists are also demanding more money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years after helping defeat a similar proposal, a Lake View Terrace homeowner group on Thursday endorsed plans to convert an empty hospital into a drug rehabilitation center in return for numerous security, lighting and landscape improvements. Leaders of the Lake View Terrace Home Owners Assn. said at a news conference that they now support plans to turn the vacant Lake View Medical Center into a 150-bed residential treatment center for teen-age drug and alcohol abusers.
NEWS
October 4, 1986 | ELEANOR CLIFT, Times Staff Writer
White House officials, concerned that expectations for the scheduled superpower meeting in Iceland next weekend may be too high, said Friday that President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev may not conclude their two-day session with a joint statement, as they did at the Geneva summit last year. In addition, the officials say, there is only "an outside possibility" that the two leaders will set a firm date for a full-scale summit in Washington later this year or early next.
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