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BUSINESS
August 11, 2010 | By Jeffrey Bartash
The White House on Wednesday said it would spend an additional $3 billion to help distressed homeowners in the states with the highest jobless rates to pay their mortgages. The latest round of funding pushes the total federal commitment up to $4.1 billion. The government already runs two other programs to help homeowners modify existing mortgages or make their monthly payments. The White House is authorized to spend up to $50 billion to help homeowners under the Troubled Asset Relief Program originally created by the Bush administration to bail out Wall Street.
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NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Michael Robertson put the bag of chemicals in an inside pocket of his sport coat, the pump in the other. He snaked the tubes between the buttons of his shirt to the port in his chest. He adjusted his tie to cover them. Then he sat down in a cavernous room in the White House complex and pulled his chair close to the table, hiding the bulges. Robertson, an aide to President Obama, was meeting with top officials from federal agencies working to implement the Affordable Care Act. He was also in treatment for stage IV colorectal cancer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1997
Re "Landlord Defections From Aid Plan Feared," Nov. 9: When a family of four with an annual income of $32,000 qualifies for public-assisted aid in housing, it is certainly time for changes to be made. If this family was qualified for housing assistance, do they also qualify for any other sort of public aid, like utility discounts, WIC, food stamps, etc.? It is no wonder that such a clamor is being made for welfare reform. Some has been done, but obviously there is more to do. Hopefully, our elected members of Congress are taking heed of this sort of abuse and will continue the reform measures.
NATIONAL
September 20, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department's inspector general testified on Capitol Hill on Thursday that a top national security official refused to cooperate with his investigation into the failed Fast and Furious gun-tracking operation and whether there were any links to the White House. Michael E. Horowitz, whose 471-page report released Wednesday outlined a series of systemic problems at the Justice Department and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, told a House oversight committee that then-White House national security assistant Kevin O'Reilly had refused to voluntarily submit to an interview.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The government will extend housing aid through August for Gulf Coast residents still displaced by hurricanes Katrina and Rita, officials said, acknowledging that wide swaths of New Orleans and parts of coastal Mississippi remain uninhabitable. The Federal Emergency Management Agency said it would continue to pay for trailers, mobile homes and apartments occupied by 130,000 families, aid that would have expired at the end of next month.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Under a court order, the Bush administration will restart a housing program for Hurricane Katrina victims this week and begin explaining to thousands of evacuees why their aid was cut off. U.S. District Judge Richard Leon ruled last month that the Federal Emergency Management Agency violated the Constitution when it eliminated short-term housing assistance and provided victims only confusing, computer-generated codes to explain its decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1990
In response to "Feinstein: The Democratic Candidate Appeals to Young Californians Who Want to Own Homes," Sept. 14: As the Director of the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), I am compelled to correct an inaccurate statement made by gubernatorial candidate Dianne Feinstein. Referencing the $600-million affordable housing bond funds approved by voters in 1988 and 1990, Feinstein stated that 90% of the money has not been spent. That is false. To date, $177 million, or 29.5%, has been committed.
OPINION
April 5, 2004
It's not surprising that one of the first federal programs on the chopping block this year is Section 8, the rental assistance program. Its recipients, some of the nation's most socially disenfranchised people, have little lobbying clout in Washington. Created as a Depression-era safety net in 1937 and expanded by the first Bush administration in 1990, the nation's primary effort to help the poor find and pay for housing serves nearly 2 million families nationwide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1987 | CARLA RIVERA, Times Staff Writer
Last-minute legislation approved by Congress will allow amnesty recipients to continue receiving housing benefits, a move applauded Wednesday by local officials who had feared that redevelopment projects would be jeopardized. The Immigration and Naturalization Service had proposed barring amnesty recipients from receiving benefits from about 40 health, education and welfare programs for five years, including Section 8 housing aid from the U.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1991 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL
The city of Oxnard's Housing Authority Commission unanimously approved a program to make families of military personnel deployed in the Persian Gulf eligible for federally subsidized housing. The program, which is subject to approval by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, would give priority to dependents of U.S. troops who supported the Gulf War, over other families applying for subsidies.
OPINION
March 25, 2012
For months, the cities of Lancaster and Palmdale have been the focus of complaints and a civil rights lawsuit alleging that city officials and city housing investigators harass minority residents on public housing assistance in an effort to drive them out. Now officials in Lancaster have turned the tables, filing a housing discrimination complaint against the Los Angeles County Housing Authority saying that it is the county, which oversees the Section...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2011 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
As welfare rolls grow, Los Angeles County officials are considering limits on how long some of the area's most destitute residents can receive cash aid. Supervisor Don Knabe is pushing a proposal to replace monthly general-relief grants with housing assistance for recipients who don't try to find jobs or apply for disability benefits within a set time period. The goal, he said, would be to drop from the rolls people who are "just riding the system" so that funds are available to help those genuinely in need.
NATIONAL
April 29, 2011 | By Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
Adopting tactics condemned by President Obama, two former White House aides launched a pair of independent groups Friday to defend him and fight the array of conservative efforts that poured money into last year's election. The move by former White House Press Secretary Bill Burton and Sean Sweeney, who served as a top aide to former Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, confirmed the sharp reversal by Democrats on the use of undisclosed political spending. Burton and Sweeney said they were moved to create their own outside groups to fend off conservatives such as the Koch brothers and American Crossroads and Crossroads GPS, independent groups co-founded by Karl Rove.
OPINION
February 21, 2011
Which way in Iraq? Re "Losing Iraq," Opinion, Feb. 13 Max Boot is right. Iraq has disappeared from our public discourse, and this is dangerous, but not for the reasons Boot espouses. By putting the invasion and occupation of Iraq on the back burner of our national attention, we risk repeating this military, economic and diplomatic disaster. Saddam Hussein had nothing to do with 9/11; George W. Bush has publicly admitted this fact. Hussein had no relationship with Al Qaeda, viewing it as a threat to his power base.
WORLD
February 10, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas and Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration's shifting response to the crisis in Egypt reflects a sharp debate over how and when Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak should leave office, a policy decision that could have long-term implications for America's image in the Middle East. After sending mixed signals, the administration has appeared to settle on supporting a measured transition for easing Mubarak out of power. That strategy, which remains the subject of vigorous debate inside the administration, calls for a Mubarak crony, Vice President Omar Suleiman, to lead the reform process.
NEWS
November 30, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro and Christi Parsons, Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama and congressional leaders called their first meeting since the midterm elections a frank but productive initial discussion of the issues before them, each expressing hope that common ground could be reached on the thorniest debate: the fate of tax rates set to expire next month. To that end, Obama announced that Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner and Jack Lew, his budget director, would immediately begin working with representatives from both parties in Congress in an attempt to broker a compromise on the matter by year's end. Speaking to reporters after the meeting Tuesday, Obama said there was "broad agreement" that they need to resolve the tax-cut issue before the rates expire, but he outlined the differences and stopped short of saying he was confident they would do so. He said he was hopeful Geithner and Lew could "break through the logjam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1991 | CAROL WATSON
Federal officials said Tuesday that they will open a center in Oxnard for farm workers hurt by last winter's crop freeze to apply for housing aid. The center will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday at the Center for Employment Training at 718 S. A St., officials said. Meanwhile, a center originally set up at the Ventura County fairgrounds was scheduled to close at 5 p.m. Tuesday.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2010 | By Jeffrey Bartash
The White House on Wednesday said it would spend an additional $3 billion to help distressed homeowners in the states with the highest jobless rates to pay their mortgages. The latest round of funding pushes the total federal commitment up to $4.1 billion. The government already runs two other programs to help homeowners modify existing mortgages or make their monthly payments. The White House is authorized to spend up to $50 billion to help homeowners under the Troubled Asset Relief Program originally created by the Bush administration to bail out Wall Street.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2009 | Renae Merle, Merle writes for the Washington Post.
Banks could get incentive payments for allowing borrowers to sell their homes at a loss rather than go through foreclosure under new guidelines issued Thursday for the Obama administration's $75-billion housing plan. The program, known as Making Home Affordable, focuses on paying lenders to modify distressed borrowers' loans so that payments are cheaper. But under this expansion of the program, lenders can also receive incentive payments if the homeowner's loan is not modified.
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