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Housing Blacks

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BUSINESS
May 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
Blacks were rejected more than twice as often as whites for home loans in the first half of 1989, a Treasury Department official testified Wednesday. From the second half of 1988 to the first half of 1989, the rejection rate for blacks rose from 23% to 29%, Jerauld C. Kluckman told a Senate Banking subcommittee. During the same period, the rejection rate for whites rose from 11% to 13%, Kluckman told the subcommittee on consumer and regulatory affairs.
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OPINION
March 13, 2005 | Stanley Crouch, Stanley Crouch, essayist and novelist, is the author of many books, among them "The All-American Skins Game" and "The Artificial White Man: Essays on Authenticity."
The White House has the power to save the civil rights establishment from irrelevance. But only if Republicans find the right way to approach black Americans -- a possibility made plausible by President Bush's strong ties to the Christian right -- forcing the black establishment to move away from the Democratic Party. The civil rights establishment, it must be noted, is not the civil rights movement.
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NEWS
November 22, 1996 | FAYE FIORE and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rep. Maxine Waters, the Los Angeles lawmaker whose outrage over alleged links between the CIA and crack cocaine helped rocket the issue into the national spotlight, has been elected to chair the influential Congressional Black Caucus next year. Known as an outspoken advocate for the poor and sometimes stingingly plain-spoken, Waters is only the third woman to chair the 39-member coalition of African American lawmakers whose collective voices have given them sway in Congress beyond their numbers.
NEWS
November 22, 1996 | FAYE FIORE and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rep. Maxine Waters, the Los Angeles lawmaker whose outrage over alleged links between the CIA and crack cocaine helped rocket the issue into the national spotlight, has been elected to chair the influential Congressional Black Caucus next year. Known as an outspoken advocate for the poor and sometimes stingingly plain-spoken, Waters is only the third woman to chair the 39-member coalition of African American lawmakers whose collective voices have given them sway in Congress beyond their numbers.
NEWS
October 24, 1987 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Democratic presidential hopeful the Rev. Jesse Jackson recently claimed part of the credit for defeating Supreme Court nominee Robert H. Bork. The Southern Voter Registration Crusade he founded in 1983 signed up 2 million new voters in 1986 "and gave us a Democratic Senate majority," Jackson declared. "We defeat Bork not just because of ideas but because we went to the schools, the pool rooms, the plant gates and the churches and put new Democrats on the book," he said.
OPINION
March 13, 2005 | Stanley Crouch, Stanley Crouch, essayist and novelist, is the author of many books, among them "The All-American Skins Game" and "The Artificial White Man: Essays on Authenticity."
The White House has the power to save the civil rights establishment from irrelevance. But only if Republicans find the right way to approach black Americans -- a possibility made plausible by President Bush's strong ties to the Christian right -- forcing the black establishment to move away from the Democratic Party. The civil rights establishment, it must be noted, is not the civil rights movement.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | GUY GUGLIOTTA, WASHINGTON POST
It was a rainy wintry day, and Gwendolyn Davis had her oven on to cut the chill. The new heaters didn't work, but the Beaumont Housing Authority had known about that for months. "They don't take care of us," said Davis, a well-spoken woman in her 60s. "When you call in a work order, half the time maintenance is somewhere else. You don't get the quick service you should, and you get nasty attitudes." Several residents of Grand Pine, a 94-unit apartment complex for low-income elderly people, have joined with nearly 40% of the tenants in Beaumont's 10 public housing projects to demand that Carolyn Hudler, Housing Authority executive director, be fired.
NEWS
April 3, 1987 | Associated Press
About 250 wives and children of black coal miners have moved into hostels intended only for men to challenge the century-old migrant labor system that separates families, union officials said today. The action, at hostels run by Anglo American Corp. coal mines, violates South African law and mine rules. Union officials said that so far management has taken "no drastic action" against the women and children.
REAL ESTATE
October 28, 2001 | Inman News Features
A largely unexplained gap between the homeownership rates of whites and blacks in Los Angeles County still would exist even if education and income levels of the two groups were equal, according to findings by the University of Southern California's Lusk Center for Real Estate. A report released last week provides new insight into differences in homeownership rates among blacks, Latinos, Asians and whites in the county.
NEWS
March 8, 1989 | From the Washington Post
Republican National Committee Chairman Lee Atwater resigned from Howard University's Board of Trustees Tuesday after a dramatic confrontation between District of Columbia riot police and students who had occupied the university's administration building to protest Atwater's selection.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | GUY GUGLIOTTA, WASHINGTON POST
It was a rainy wintry day, and Gwendolyn Davis had her oven on to cut the chill. The new heaters didn't work, but the Beaumont Housing Authority had known about that for months. "They don't take care of us," said Davis, a well-spoken woman in her 60s. "When you call in a work order, half the time maintenance is somewhere else. You don't get the quick service you should, and you get nasty attitudes." Several residents of Grand Pine, a 94-unit apartment complex for low-income elderly people, have joined with nearly 40% of the tenants in Beaumont's 10 public housing projects to demand that Carolyn Hudler, Housing Authority executive director, be fired.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
Blacks were rejected more than twice as often as whites for home loans in the first half of 1989, a Treasury Department official testified Wednesday. From the second half of 1988 to the first half of 1989, the rejection rate for blacks rose from 23% to 29%, Jerauld C. Kluckman told a Senate Banking subcommittee. During the same period, the rejection rate for whites rose from 11% to 13%, Kluckman told the subcommittee on consumer and regulatory affairs.
NEWS
October 24, 1987 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Democratic presidential hopeful the Rev. Jesse Jackson recently claimed part of the credit for defeating Supreme Court nominee Robert H. Bork. The Southern Voter Registration Crusade he founded in 1983 signed up 2 million new voters in 1986 "and gave us a Democratic Senate majority," Jackson declared. "We defeat Bork not just because of ideas but because we went to the schools, the pool rooms, the plant gates and the churches and put new Democrats on the book," he said.
OPINION
September 4, 2003
In issuing a preliminary injunction barring real estate magnate Donald Sterling from using "Korean" in the names of his apartment buildings, U.S. District Judge A. Howard Matz sent an unambiguous message to landlords regionwide: Housing discrimination, however subliminal, will not be tolerated. Sterling, better known as the owner of pro basketball's Los Angeles Clippers, owns about 100 apartment buildings in Southern California.
NEWS
December 17, 1995 | JOAN KIRCHNER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Three days after this regal coastal city elected its first black mayor, the campaign manager warned the staff: Beware of all packages delivered to the office. No one had threatened violence but "we can't take any chances," he said. In a majority black city that has thrived on all-white social clubs, segregated neighborhoods and separate debutante balls for each race, residents are adjusting to the latest shattered racial barrier.
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