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Housing California

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NEWS
March 29, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Confirming earlier studies, the first statewide survey of radon in California has found that the radioactive gas--believed to be the second-most frequent cause of lung cancer in the United States--is present only in low levels in most California homes. Based on a yearlong sampling of 385 dwellings statewide, an estimated 88,000 single-family houses in California--about 1% of them--may contain radon beyond the recommended maximum.
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BUSINESS
February 13, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Millions of Californians remain stuck in the state's increasingly expensive rental markets, unable to buy homes as they deal with tight credit markets and damage to their finances from the Great Recession. Sounds like a mess fit for two of the nation's most prominent turnaround specialists - California Gov. Jerry Brown, fresh off his state budget-balancing act, and Bank of America Corp. Chief Executive Brian Moynihan, still engaged in resurrecting that institution from the mortgage meltdown.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1987 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
An Anaheim manufacturer of valves that automatically shut off natural gas lines during earthquakes is pushing legislation to require the devices in new homes, even though the state's two biggest gas companies say the valves are unnecessary and perhaps even dangerous. The company sponsoring the measure, Quakemaster Inc., is one of only two firms certified by the state to sell the valves, which would be required in earthquake-prone parts of the state.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Esther McCoy is having a moment. The architecture critic and historian, who died in 1989 at age 85, is the subject of a smart Pacific Standard Time exhibition at the Schindler House in West Hollywood, building on McCoy's deep connections with Rudolph Schindler himself. The show is accompanied by a Getty-funded catalog, and early next year East of Borneo Press will publish "Piecing Together Los Angeles," an anthology of McCoy's essays on architecture. What this turn in the spotlight will make clear to the public is what every architecture critic who has spent significant time in this city already knows: It was McCoy who first gave shape to the story of modern architecture in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2001 | DIANE WEDNER and JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Housing advocates met with Los Angeles business leaders Friday to ask the private sector to help form financial partnerships and devise solutions to the state's worsening affordable housing crisis. The meeting is part of an effort by Los Angeles officials, nonprofits, community groups and local businesses to form a united front to address one of the most pressing problems facing Southern California.
NEWS
June 24, 1995 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A power struggle is raging inside the new suburban houses of Southern California with plenty of implications for American life and family activities. But it has nothing to do with teen-agers' hormones or household finances. The strife is over floor plans. It pits the fireplace vs. the television, the formal living room vs. the flop-on-couch/watch-videos/eat microwaved-food family room. And the television--especially the big-screen job--is winning hands-down.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1992 | From Associated Press
People living in Jackson, Mich., enjoyed the most affordable housing in America as summer began, according to a survey released Tuesday by the National Assn. of Home Builders. Those shopping for homes outside the Midwest might look at the Brazoria, Tex., area in the South; or Greeley, Colo., in the West, or Nashua, N.H., in the Northeast. They were the most affordable in their regions. Pass San Francisco, however. It was the most expensive metropolitan area in the home builders' survey.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
A consortium of 20 California banks plans to begin making $100 million worth of loans annually for multifamily, affordable housing in the state within a year, officials of the organization said Tuesday. Formation of the new group, called the California Community Reinvestment Corp., marks the first time that California banks have agreed to a cooperative joint venture of this nature, said John R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY and DANIEL YI and HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California cities are among the most crowded in the nation, as high housing prices and a chronic apartment shortage have forced families to double up and homeowners to rent bedrooms and garages. Crowding detailed in the latest U.S. census can be seen especially in largely Latino cities that have become major ports of entry for poor immigrants seeking a better life.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anglos and Asians in California more commonly own their homes, while Latinos and blacks usually rent, according to preliminary data from the 1990 census. For people of any race or ethnicity, home ownership has become an elusive goal for a majority of California's baby boomers. They were age 25 to 44 when the census was conducted, and in that group only 45% who are the head of a household own their home.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2010 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
If Republicans win control of the House in the Nov. 2 election, California's congressional delegation will undergo a dramatic transfer of power, as Democrats such as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of San Francisco and Rep. Henry A. Waxman of Beverly Hills give way to a team of Republicans who could take over at least five committees. Although Democrats are certain to remain in the majority of the state's delegation, California Republicans hold enough seniority within their party to wield the chairmanship gavels of more committees than any other state: ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2010 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
It can be lonely spending the summer in a mainly vacant college dormitory. But it's a worthwhile tradeoff for Daysi Espinoza, who's grateful to have a room at Cal State Fullerton to call home. For Espinoza and hundreds of other former foster youths attending California's public universities, dorm rooms provide a much-needed stable residence. While classmates can retreat to childhood bedrooms and their families' embrace, these students are often on their own and want to stay in their dorms during vacations.
NATIONAL
January 17, 2009 | Mark Z. Barabak and Richard Simon
As Barack Obama and his fellow Democrats celebrate their political ascendancy, Dianne Feinstein is front and center. And that is not always a welcome thing for members of her own party. In recent days Feinstein has sent an unmistakable signal to the president-elect and the rest of Washington: California's senior senator will not be taken for granted or hew to the party line simply because that might seem proper at the rosy dawn of a new Democratic era.
REAL ESTATE
November 16, 2003 | Diane Wedner, Times Staff Writer
When Arnold Schwarzenegger is sworn in as the 38th governor of California on Monday, he will inherit the power and privileges that come with running the nation's most populous state. There is one thing, however, he and wife, Maria Shriver, will not inherit: his predecessors' four-bedroom suburban ranch house on Lake Wilhaggin Drive in Sacramento. It's going on the market. In a state where realty is next to godliness, even the governor's house is up for grabs.
NEWS
February 4, 2002 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This agricultural outpost in the lower San Joaquin Valley has no city hall, no municipal police force, no street lights and no benches in the park for young lovers on hot summer nights. One thing it does have in surplus is people. Per household, this dusty spot on the map 40 miles northwest of Bakersfield is the most crowded community in California. An average of 5.6 people live in every tumbledown bungalow and rusting mobile home in town. Of course, that's just an average.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2001 | Diane Wedner
The number of residents able to afford homes in California in May inched up 2 percentage points to 33% over the same period last year, the California Assn. of Realtors said. In Orange County only 23% of residents were able to afford homes, whereas in Los Angeles and Ventura counties, about 36% of residents could afford a median-priced home in May.
NEWS
December 20, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
In a ruling that could upset plans for low-rent public housing throughout California, the state Supreme Court held Monday that voters must receive the details of such projects before they may be approved in local referendums. A sharply divided court ruled 4 to 3 that municipal officials must disclose the size and type of a project and the community in which it will be constructed. If several sites are under consideration, those sites must be revealed, the justices said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1989 | JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Homeless shelters in Los Angeles County are turning away 1,800 people each night and are dramatically reducing child-care, job referral and apartment placement programs designed to get families permanently off the street, according to a study released Wednesday by state Senate President Pro Tem David A. Roberti and a Los Angeles shelter organization. Pointing to vetoes this year by Gov.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sales of existing homes in California fell almost 13% in May from a year earlier, but were up 2.1% from April, the California Assn. of Realtors said Monday. Nationally, sales of previously owned homes rose 2.9% to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.37 million units in May, from a revised pace of 5.22 million in April.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY and DANIEL YI and HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California cities are among the most crowded in the nation, as high housing prices and a chronic apartment shortage have forced families to double up and homeowners to rent bedrooms and garages. Crowding detailed in the latest U.S. census can be seen especially in largely Latino cities that have become major ports of entry for poor immigrants seeking a better life.
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