Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHousing Crunch
IN THE NEWS

Housing Crunch

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 23, 1998
Hopefully, "Shortage of Affordable Senior Housing in Store, Critics Say" [Aug. 4] will be a wake-up call for business and politicians. The greater number of seniors in need of such a program are, like me, the forgotten middle class. We don't qualify for nonprofit subsidized housing (in which the builder makes a handsome profit), nor can we afford the housing at prices quoted. HYMAN H. HAVES Pacific Palisades
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 23, 2013 | By Alejandro Lazo
Expect more homes on the market as prices begin to rise. Locally, an easing of the inventory squeeze probably could not come soon enough for some, with real estate agents so desperate for listings they are scavenging for homes off the market. A slight improvement in inventory is already showing up in the raw data. Southern California's housing recovery: An interactive map Listings jumped 11.3% month over month in May in Los Angeles County, according to data from Realtor.com.
Advertisement
REAL ESTATE
March 7, 1999
Although Bradley Inman's Feb. 28 California Trends column ("Finding Solutions to the Housing Crunch") suggests the difficulty of housing California's future numbers, it falls far short of stating how complicated the problem will be. He is worried about the 10 million people who will arrive here from elsewhere by 2040 and concludes by asking, "How will we possibly house 10 million more people?" But Inman has counted only those who are expected to move to the Golden State; he has not even considered the excess of births over deaths that will also feed our numbers.
NATIONAL
October 7, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
Even though the economy is slowly growing, the housing crunch is continuing to weaken cities' budgets across the country, according to a report released Wednesday. The report from the National League of Cities found that nearly 90% of municipalities were having trouble balancing their books this year. "While the recession has officially ended for the national economy, cities are now in the eye of the storm," said Christopher Hoene, the organization's director of policy and research and a coauthor of the report.
MAGAZINE
June 1, 2003
Brilliant bit of editorial juxtaposition with two housing stories in the April 27 issue ("The Battle of Ft. Ord," by Dan Baum, and "Keeping Up With the Jonesing," by Bill Sharpsteen). What better proof of America's flawed societal values taking the "bigger is better" madness to a new level? The zenith of this silliness is the $2.5-million McMansion, with its 25-foot-high ceilings, jammed onto a proportionately minuscule lot. Meanwhile, as another much larger segment of the populace is finding it nearly impossible to procure affordable housing for their families, hundreds of livable units at Ft. Ord are rotting while greedy interests argue over what to do with them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2000
Re "An Unaffordable Housing Crunch," May 7: Your editorial, which advocates housing priced so that our service-industry employees can afford to live decently, indicated one result of failing would be the loss of jobs. That, to many, would be the ultimate growth control measure. Don't build the housing and the jobs will go and Orange County won't have this growth problem. It doesn't work that way. The jobs continue to grow regardless. Our weather and transportation systems are such that this area will not reduce jobs because of not producing housing for the working poor.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2009 | Peter Y. Hong
Sometimes the truth hurts. Real estate salesman Jim Klinge doesn't care. Cruising through the sunny hills of Carlsbad in a massive silver Mercedes-Benz, he looks like any other pitchman of the California dream. But Klinge, 50, has become a notorious Internet chronicler of the real estate crash in north San Diego County, where he has lived and worked for decades. Rather than downplay the greed and excess that caused the region's travails, he revels in exposing them.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Reversing a decade-long trend, many of America's largest cities are now growing more quickly than the rest of the nation, another sign of an economic crisis that is making it harder for people to move. Census data released today highlight a city resurgence in coastal regions and areas of the Midwest and Northeast, as the housing crunch, recession and higher gas prices have slowed migration to far-flung suburbs and residential hot spots in the South and West. The 2008 population figures show New York and Chicago made gains from higher births, while Philadelphia stanched population losses.
NEWS
December 28, 2007 | BY GUSTAVO ARELLANO, Gustavo Arellano, a contributing editor to Opinion, is author of "¡Ask a Mexican!"
Remember the days of homesteaders, when generations lived under one prairie-sod roof? That all-American ethos still exists among many Latinos, whether packing five families into a one-bedroom apartment or children who don't leave the casa until marrying at 35. Call it antiquated, retrograde, how the other half lives -- I say it's the solution to our housing crunch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1987 | RAY PEREZ, Times Staff Writer
Lance Cpl. Paul Lewis gets $425 from the government for housing, but at Orange County's inflated rental prices he can't afford to live here. Not with a wife and three small children. So Lewis, 22, rents a three-bedroom apartment for $550 a month in Riverside. He rises long before dawn each day and fights the freeway traffic to arrive at his job at El Toro Marine Corps Air Station by 7 a.m. After work, he rushes to a job at a fast-food restaurant in Irvine, where he puts in another six hours.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Reversing a decade-long trend, many of America's largest cities are now growing more quickly than the rest of the nation, another sign of an economic crisis that is making it harder for people to move. Census data released today highlight a city resurgence in coastal regions and areas of the Midwest and Northeast, as the housing crunch, recession and higher gas prices have slowed migration to far-flung suburbs and residential hot spots in the South and West. The 2008 population figures show New York and Chicago made gains from higher births, while Philadelphia stanched population losses.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2009 | Peter Y. Hong
Marco Huerta and Youngmin Bae bought their Burbank home without ever meeting their real estate agent. Instead, they scoured listings for their favorite neighborhoods, haggled over prices and even wrote their offer using Marco's cellphone. There was no housewarming plant on the porch when they moved in, but the couple aren't complaining: They received a $10,000 check as a "rebate" from their agent's 3% commission. "It's a great incentive," said Marco Huerta, 32.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2009 | Peter Y. Hong
Curtis Forrester moved into a brand-new house in Victorville last week, but there was little time to enjoy the Jacuzzi and designer kitchen. He was there only to see it destroyed. Just a few days after his arrival, the two-story residence and three other luxurious model homes were crushed and hauled off for scrap, the latest fallout from Southern California's real estate crash. The homes were part of a planned 16-unit project in this community 100 miles north of Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2009 | Peter Y. Hong
Sometimes the truth hurts. Real estate salesman Jim Klinge doesn't care. Cruising through the sunny hills of Carlsbad in a massive silver Mercedes-Benz, he looks like any other pitchman of the California dream. But Klinge, 50, has become a notorious Internet chronicler of the real estate crash in north San Diego County, where he has lived and worked for decades. Rather than downplay the greed and excess that caused the region's travails, he revels in exposing them.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2008 | Ken Bensinger, Times Staff Writer
When economic worries rise, many consumers forgo life's little luxuries. Those luxuries are getting a lot bigger. March proved another tough month for carmakers, with overall U.S. sales declining 12% compared to the same month last year, reports released Tuesday showed. While results were bad in nearly all categories, among the larger drags were luxury vehicles, which declined 15%, according to Autodata Corp.
NEWS
December 28, 2007 | BY GUSTAVO ARELLANO, Gustavo Arellano, a contributing editor to Opinion, is author of "¡Ask a Mexican!"
Remember the days of homesteaders, when generations lived under one prairie-sod roof? That all-American ethos still exists among many Latinos, whether packing five families into a one-bedroom apartment or children who don't leave the casa until marrying at 35. Call it antiquated, retrograde, how the other half lives -- I say it's the solution to our housing crunch.
HOME & GARDEN
December 20, 2007 | Janet Eastman, Times Staff Writer
IT has been an ugly year for home magazines, and we're not talking about the return of animal skins as symbols of style. Martha Stewart's year-old Blueprint, a bimonthly design and lifestyle magazine aimed at young women, announced Dec. 10 that it will cease publication with its next issue. After a century in print, House & Garden delivered its final edition this month. Also bowing out: InStyle Home, Robb Report Luxury Home and, after just one issue, Robb Report Vertical Living.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2007 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
Early one recent Friday morning, government agents dressed in military fatigues and lugging sledgehammers stormed into one apartment after another at a huge housing complex here. They smashed walls and tossed tenants' belongings outside. Frightened occupants fled. These weren't drug houses or prostitution dens. The targets of raids were "collective rentals": apartments divided into tiny rooms and crammed with 10 or more tenants, many of them migrant workers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|