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Housing Discrimination

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NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Benjamin Mueller
The reassuring story of desegregation in America has gotten a lot of play these last few years. Black migration to suburbs and an influx of immigrants, we're told, have relegated all-white neighborhoods to the ash heap of history. It's “THE END OF THE SEGREGATED CENTURY,” one recent study breathlessly reported. The real story is more complicated. All-white neighborhoods may have gone extinct, but all-black neighborhoods have not. In Los Angeles, some low-diversity, predominantly white neighborhoods became more diverse between 1990 and 2000, but every one of them remained predominantly white . Increased racial diversity, in other words, does not equal desegregation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 12, 2013 | By Martin Eichner
Question: It has been very tough finding a new apartment in today's rental market. I finally found an apartment that I love, but the property manager said she doesn't think it's a good fit. When I asked her why, she said she noticed that I use a cane and the apartment is on the second floor without elevator access. She told me she felt that I could not constantly climb the stairs without hurting myself. She said that there should be a ground-floor unit available soon, which would be better for me. I appreciate her concern for my health, but I want the apartment on the second floor.
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OPINION
April 29, 2007
Re "New Orleans' blacks see rental block," April 25 It's unfortunate that, in 2007, people are still being discriminated against when it comes to securing and maintaining housing. In my role in the Department of Housing and Urban Development, I am responsible for enforcing the Fair Housing Act, which prohibits discrimination in the sale, rental and financing of dwellings based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status or disability. In addition to HUD's enforcement activities, compelling stories like these assist our education and outreach efforts by informing the public about their fair housing rights.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2013 | By Alejandro Lazo
Gay couples have a harder time finding a place to rent together than straight couples, according to the first national housing study on the issue. Released Tuesday, the report by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development found that same-sex couples received fewer responses from rental agents than heterosexual couples when responding to online advertisements. Gay male couples have it more difficult than lesbian couples, according to the research. “We need to continue our efforts to ensure that everyone is treated the same when it comes to finding a home to call their own, regardless of their sexual orientation,” Housing Secretary Shaun Donovan said in news release announcing the study.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, rejecting the advice of the Obama administration, will consider whether to limit the federal housing discrimination law to cases of actual and proven bias against blacks or Latinos. The justices voted to hear a New Jersey city's appeal arguing it cannot be held liable for housing discrimination for redeveloping a depressed neighborhood and reducing the number of homes that are available to African Americans and Latinos. At issue is whether the Fair Housing Act forbids actions by cities or mortgage lenders that have a “discriminatory effect” on racial minorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2010 | By Garrett Therolf, Los Angeles Times
A Norco housewife, whose protests against a group home for the developmentally disabled drew the scrutiny of housing discrimination investigators, has settled a lawsuit alleging the government inquiry infringed on her right to free speech. Julie Waltz, 64, agreed this month to settle her case in exchange for $110,000 and the promise that the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing will establish a "Julie Waltz First Amendment Policy." The new policy prohibits the department from investigating citizens for housing discrimination solely on the basis of free speech activity, including speaking at public meetings, and writing, distributing and displaying signs or newspaper articles critical of public housing projects, even if they appear to advocate discriminatory policies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
The city of Palmdale has agreed to settle a civil rights lawsuit accusing it of harassing and evicting nonwhite recipients of federal housing subsidies, officials announced Thursday. The announcement came the same day a federal judge denied attempts by Palmdale and neighboring Lancaster to dismiss the lawsuit. In announcing the settlement, Palmdale officials insisted that they had done nothing wrong and said that settling would cost less than a court battle. The lawsuit was filed in June by the National Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1994 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal disaster officials said Saturday that earthquake victims seeking emergency housing have lodged more than 200 complaints against landlords for alleged illegal discrimination. The officials, responding to what they termed a "substantial" problem, issued a warning that landlords would be hauled into court and prosecuted if they used race, gender, national origin, disabilities or family size to discriminate against quake victims seeking housing.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court reached out Monday to take up a politically volatile housing discrimination issue that the Obama administration had gone to great lengths to keep away from the court. The justices voted to hear a New Jersey city's appeal arguing it could not be held liable for housing discrimination in redeveloping a depressed neighborhood and reducing the number of homes that are available to African Americans and Latinos. At issue is whether the Fair Housing Act forbids actions by cities or mortgage lenders that have a "discriminatory effect" on racial minorities.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Benjamin Mueller
The reassuring story of desegregation in America has gotten a lot of play these last few years. Black migration to suburbs and an influx of immigrants, we're told, have relegated all-white neighborhoods to the ash heap of history. It's “THE END OF THE SEGREGATED CENTURY,” one recent study breathlessly reported. The real story is more complicated. All-white neighborhoods may have gone extinct, but all-black neighborhoods have not. In Los Angeles, some low-diversity, predominantly white neighborhoods became more diverse between 1990 and 2000, but every one of them remained predominantly white . Increased racial diversity, in other words, does not equal desegregation.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2013 | By Martin Eichner
Question: I have lived in my current apartment building for three years with no problems, but recently a new manager took over. I originally came to the U.S. on a work visa; I was born and raised in China and speak Cantonese as my first language. As a result, I speak with a heavy accent. I am also much more comfortable with written English than with speaking English. About a month ago, I got a notice of a rent increase from the new manager, which surprised me because I had just gotten a rent increase a few months earlier.
OPINION
March 25, 2012
For months, the cities of Lancaster and Palmdale have been the focus of complaints and a civil rights lawsuit alleging that city officials and city housing investigators harass minority residents on public housing assistance in an effort to drive them out. Now officials in Lancaster have turned the tables, filing a housing discrimination complaint against the Los Angeles County Housing Authority saying that it is the county, which oversees the Section...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
Officials in Lancaster filed a complaint Wednesday against Los Angeles County and its housing authority, charging race-based housing discrimination. The complaint, which officials said was the prelude to a possible class action suit, alleges that the agency unlawfully favors African Americans in granting vouchers under Section 8 of the Federal Housing Act. The authority, officials allege, discriminates against other eligible groups and its actions constitute "unlawful and discriminatory racial steering practices that essentially coerce blacks to move to Lancaster, leaving the city with a disproportionate share of blacks on federal housing assistance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
The city of Palmdale has agreed to settle a civil rights lawsuit accusing it of harassing and evicting nonwhite recipients of federal housing subsidies, officials announced Thursday. The announcement came the same day a federal judge denied attempts by Palmdale and neighboring Lancaster to dismiss the lawsuit. In announcing the settlement, Palmdale officials insisted that they had done nothing wrong and said that settling would cost less than a court battle. The lawsuit was filed in June by the National Assn.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Washington Bureau
As the Obama administration moves to end the ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the military, the Pentagon is still grappling with major questions about how it will integrate them into the ranks. President Obama notified Congress on Friday that the ban would be abolished on Sept. 20 and said that it could be done without harming the military's readiness. Congress required the certification when it voted in December to repeal the 17-year-old policy that requires discharging openly gay and lesbian service members.
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