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Housing Element

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November 23, 1989
The Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on a proposed draft of the city's housing needs and policies Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in City Council chambers, 1685 Main St. Under state law, cities are required to update the "housing element" of their General Plan every five years. The housing element is composed of two main sections: an assessment of existing and future housing needs, and a description of policies and programs to address those needs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2006 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Marlton Square, a long-troubled cornerstone redevelopment project for the Crenshaw area, has suffered another setback after a partner ended its agreement to build a new shopping center on the property, city officials have acknowledged.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2000 | Deniene Husted, (714) 520-2508
Future housing needs for the city will be discussed Wednesday by the Planning Commission as part of a continued review of the city's 2000-05 Housing Element Update. The study also covers infrastructure and other aspects. Planning commissioners had discussed the housing element last month, but continued the matter for further input before passing it along to the City Council to consider. The public will be invited to comment on the plan at the meeting, which begins at 6:30 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2002 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Matilda Mitchell never wanted to leave Pasadena. The city had been her home nearly all her life. It was where she worked, went to school and was raising her son. The former store clerk was one semester away from a degree at Pasadena City College. Leaving was never part of her plan. But Mitchell searched all over Pasadena and could not find an affordable apartment to replace the one she lost when new owners raised rents and refused to accept her.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2000 | Marissa Espino, (714) 966-5879
The city is offering a public workshop about the community's housing needs at 7 p.m. Monday in Conference Room C at 300 E. Chapman Ave. The city is preparing the 2000-2005 Housing Element, which identifies programs and policies to help Orange maintain safe and decent housing for families of all income levels. Information: (714) 744-7220.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2000 | Deniene Husted, (714) 520-2508
The Planning Commission will meet Wednesday to consider the city's 2000-05 Housing Element--a five-year study of local housing needs and projections required by the state. Commission members will consider the report, which projects a need for about 1,040 new affordable housing units to be built by 2005.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1985 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
The state Court of Appeal has reinstated a major portion of a lawsuit that challenges the Newport Beach general housing plan as inadequate in addressing and providing for the needs of people with low and moderate income. In a unanimous decision released Tuesday, the three-judge panel in Santa Ana ruled that the Superior Court could not dismiss as moot a challenge to the plan--formally known as a housing element-simply because the city amended the element.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2000 | Raul Gallegos, (714) 520-2512
City officials have awarded a contract to RBF Consultants to revise the General Plan, which serves as a basic document governing development within the city. The revision will encompass eight different elements: land use, noise, open space/conservation, traffic circulation, seismic/safety, recreation and parks, growth management, and housing. State law requires the housing element be updated by Dec. 31.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1991
Unable to create low-income housing within its own boundaries, Rolling Hills will have to rely on neighboring cities to comply with state fair-housing guidelines, City Council members have decided. Officials of the private, gated, exclusively residential community Monday approved a new housing element for the city's General Plan that points to city codes that allow only one house per acre and do not permit rentals. The city uses no public funds to maintain roads or parks. City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2001 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of effort and several failures, the city of Los Angeles on Tuesday adopted a blueprint for meeting housing needs through 2005. The City Council approved the state-required "housing element" detailing city policies, programs and projects designed to increase the current housing stock. Although such plans have been required by state law for years, pressure to complete them is increasing because of the severe shortage of affordable housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2001 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of effort and several failures, the city of Los Angeles on Tuesday adopted a blueprint for meeting housing needs through 2005. The City Council approved the state-required "housing element" detailing city policies, programs and projects designed to increase the current housing stock. Although such plans have been required by state law for years, pressure to complete them is increasing because of the severe shortage of affordable housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2001 | EVAN HALPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Orange County supervisors pondered the housing crunch for "very low income" residents Tuesday, St. Joseph Hospital spokeswoman Mary Ann Gaido took the podium to remind them just who the bulk of those people are. Not welfare recipients or disabled elderly surviving on a Social Security check, she said. They are people like the nurses and groundskeepers at her hospital, who make a minimum of $10 an hour. They can't afford to live in Orange County, Gaido said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2000 | Deniene Husted, (714) 520-2508
The Planning Commission will meet Wednesday to consider the city's 2000-05 Housing Element--a five-year study of local housing needs and projections required by the state. Commission members will consider the report, which projects a need for about 1,040 new affordable housing units to be built by 2005.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2000 | Raul Gallegos, (714) 520-2512
City officials have awarded a contract to RBF Consultants to revise the General Plan, which serves as a basic document governing development within the city. The revision will encompass eight different elements: land use, noise, open space/conservation, traffic circulation, seismic/safety, recreation and parks, growth management, and housing. State law requires the housing element be updated by Dec. 31.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2000 | Deniene Husted, (714) 520-2508
Future housing needs for the city will be discussed Wednesday by the Planning Commission as part of a continued review of the city's 2000-05 Housing Element Update. The study also covers infrastructure and other aspects. Planning commissioners had discussed the housing element last month, but continued the matter for further input before passing it along to the City Council to consider. The public will be invited to comment on the plan at the meeting, which begins at 6:30 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2000 | CHRIS CEBALLOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While the Southern California Assn. of Governments appeals the state to lower its expectation for new housing, currently 504,000 new units by 2005, Villa Park officials report that their tiny city is ahead of the game. The City Council recently approved a preliminary draft of the housing element report required by the state Department of Housing and Community Development. The report is intended to outline a city's housing needs and plans to meet that need over a five-year period.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1990 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In adopting a five-year housing policy Tuesday, the Oxnard City Council approved the final section of a General Plan that will guide development in the city for the next 30 years. The housing element, which was adopted by a 3 to 2 vote, requires that 45% of the housing units built in the next five years be set aside for moderate-, low- and very low-income residents.
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