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Housing Federal Aid

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1990 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the thousands of people who live in Nickerson Gardens will start going to class this week for lessons in how to take over their housing project, the largest in Los Angeles and one of the most troubled. About 50 Nickerson Gardens residents are expected to show up for the beginning of a yearlong series of training sessions intended to help them form a management corporation that would gradually replace the Los Angeles Housing Authority in running the Watts housing project.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | EVAN HALPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Orange County residents rushed to apply for federal Section 8 housing assistance Friday, as county officials opened the program's waiting list for the first time in two years. Applicants lined up at municipal buildings and libraries long before they opened, in hopes that being early would increase the chance of getting a voucher in a county where affordable housing is scarce. "We had a guy here at 4:30 a.m.
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NEWS
August 5, 1989 | MICHAEL FLAGG, Times Staff Writer
Al Wiggins was a small Santa Ana home builder who started out as a barber. Mac Binger was born to one of the wealthiest families in America: prominent Midwesterners, owners of thoroughbred racehorses and Broadway theaters. This unlikely pair teamed up to build luxury condominiums around a golf course and country club in the resort town of Palm Desert using a federal Department of Housing and Urban Development program for the poor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2000
The cities of Pico Rivera, Lancaster, Palmdale and Santa Clarita will receive a total of $2.1 million in federal housing funds, boosting local efforts to aid poor and elderly residents, officials have announced. The money comes from nearly $42.7 million in U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development funds to be handed out across the state, Gov. Gray Davis said in a statement issued this week. Pico Rivera's $498,750 grant will also fund repair projects by poor homeowners, the statement said.
NEWS
February 5, 1994 | From The Washington Post
Vice President Al Gore and several Cabinet members Friday announced an initiative to fight violent crime in public housing and to curb corruption in administering federally assisted low-income housing projects. Gore said the program, called Operation Safe Home, displayed "absolutely extraordinary, I believe unprecedented" cooperation among agencies whose relations, particularly in law enforcement, frequently are marked by friction and mistrust. Henry G.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the massive, crime-ridden Pruitt-Igoe housing project was torn down here in 1972--"the collapse of liberalism," one columnist called it--its destruction became a graphic symbol of the failure of the nation's public-housing policy. Now it's the conservatives' turn. In 1973, two of the projects in the same North Side neighborhood as Pruitt-Igoe became among the first in the country to experiment with tenant management.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | EVAN HALPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Orange County residents rushed to apply for federal Section 8 housing assistance Friday, as county officials opened the program's waiting list for the first time in two years. Applicants lined up at municipal buildings and libraries long before they opened, in hopes that being early would increase the chance of getting a voucher in a county where affordable housing is scarce. "We had a guy here at 4:30 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2000
The cities of Pico Rivera, Lancaster, Palmdale and Santa Clarita will receive a total of $2.1 million in federal housing funds, boosting local efforts to aid poor and elderly residents, officials have announced. The money comes from nearly $42.7 million in U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development funds to be handed out across the state, Gov. Gray Davis said in a statement issued this week. Pico Rivera's $498,750 grant will also fund repair projects by poor homeowners, the statement said.
NEWS
January 8, 1994 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is planning to cut more than $2 billion from several longstanding federal public housing programs in an effort to free more funds for higher-priority initiatives endorsed by the White House, sources here said Friday. Given the tight fiscal constraints it is facing, the White House has been forced to reduce funding for an array of programs in the 1995 budget that it will present to Congress next month.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everyone seems to agree there is a problem: Too many Americans can't find affordable housing. According to a recent study by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Low Income Housing Information Service, two Washington nonprofit research groups that have conducted a series of studies on affordable housing, the number of poor households has increased as the number of low-income rental units has declined. The net result has been "a loss of 1.8 million low-rent units . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1999 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging that the housing needs of smaller cities are often eclipsed by those of mammoth Los Angeles, the mayors of six local municipalities on Thursday announced a partnership with Fannie Mae designed to revitalize housing in their communities. The Neighborhood Investment Alliance is a collaborative effort between Fannie Mae, the largest provider of U.S. home mortgages, and the mayors of Carson, Compton, Inglewood, Lynwood, Pasadena and Pomona.
NEWS
January 22, 1998 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration, touting a broadening decline in the nation's welfare rolls, on Wednesday unveiled a $1.3-billion program to help defray the housing costs of welfare recipients making the transition to work. The president's latest initiative came as the federal government released new figures showing the nation's welfare rolls have dropped by 2.2 million in the last year alone. That is the lowest level in more than 25 years.
NEWS
July 29, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
Crack and guns and teenage pregnancies haven't been conquered, but the news from the cities isn't all bad. Joel Garcia and his family testify to that. Until last spring, Garcia, his wife, Marta, their two teenage daughters and their baby girl all squeezed into a timeworn two-bedroom apartment in East Boston, a neighborhood just north of Logan Airport. Now the Garcias can spread out: They own their home on East Boston's Prince Street.
NEWS
July 28, 1995 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving toward a vision of a smaller, less powerful federal government, the conservative-led Congress has opened debate on legislation to dismantle the edifice of housing, environmental and other social programs that touch the lives of millions of Americans.
NEWS
February 5, 1994 | From The Washington Post
Vice President Al Gore and several Cabinet members Friday announced an initiative to fight violent crime in public housing and to curb corruption in administering federally assisted low-income housing projects. Gore said the program, called Operation Safe Home, displayed "absolutely extraordinary, I believe unprecedented" cooperation among agencies whose relations, particularly in law enforcement, frequently are marked by friction and mistrust. Henry G.
NEWS
January 8, 1994 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is planning to cut more than $2 billion from several longstanding federal public housing programs in an effort to free more funds for higher-priority initiatives endorsed by the White House, sources here said Friday. Given the tight fiscal constraints it is facing, the White House has been forced to reduce funding for an array of programs in the 1995 budget that it will present to Congress next month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
The City Council tonight will decide whether to assist Irvine Temporary Housing in its effort to win $75,000 worth of federal grants. The grants, which Irvine Temporary Housing would receive over three years, would be used by the nonprofit organization to provide transitional housing for those in need. If the council gives its approval, the city would serve as a "co-applicant" for the grants--a move that could improve the organization's chances of getting the money.
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