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NEWS
April 12, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 10 years, Steven Kung's home has been a bed in a tiny room with 16 other bunkmates, his possessions carefully packed in plastic bags and tied to the metal bed frame. On a lone wire hanger in his quarters is a monogrammed, tailored shirt that Kung once wore as a civil servant--in Hong Kong's Housing Department. But even that life's labor didn't keep him from ending up just one step away from homeless himself.
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NEWS
April 12, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 10 years, Steven Kung's home has been a bed in a tiny room with 16 other bunkmates, his possessions carefully packed in plastic bags and tied to the metal bed frame. On a lone wire hanger in his quarters is a monogrammed, tailored shirt that Kung once wore as a civil servant--in Hong Kong's Housing Department. But even that life's labor didn't keep him from ending up just one step away from homeless himself.
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BUSINESS
July 25, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Housing Prices Fall in Second Quarter: The government's policies to cool the booming real estate market helped bring down housing prices by as much as 12% in the quarter, said real estate consultant Jones Lang Wootton. Residential housing prices fell between 8% and 12%, while luxury housing prices dropped 3.2%, the firm said.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Housing Prices Fall in Second Quarter: The government's policies to cool the booming real estate market helped bring down housing prices by as much as 12% in the quarter, said real estate consultant Jones Lang Wootton. Residential housing prices fell between 8% and 12%, while luxury housing prices dropped 3.2%, the firm said.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I live here. I work here. It is my home. But now I must go and leave my world behind," said Cheung Muk-ching, a 66-year-old shop owner residing deep within the labyrinthine Walled City just north of Hong Kong's international airport. Cheung's neighborhood is a monument to man's ability to survive in adverse surroundings.
NEWS
October 9, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa continued a British tradition of unveiling the new government's policies in the wood-paneled chambers of the Legislative Council building on Wednesday, exactly 100 days after Hong Kong's return to China. But while the setting was nearly the same as when Tung's predecessor, British Gov. Chris Patten, announced controversial democratic reforms five years ago, Tung's message for Hong Kong was completely different.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1994 | JOHN ROTHCHILD, John Rothchild is the financial columnist for Time magazine.
The Brits are losing Hong Kong in 1,000 days, but Westerners are not fleeing the prospect of imminent Chinese rule, they are pouring in. The U.S. contingent has doubled in size since 1984, to 30,000, and includes a large squadron of investment bankers whose presence puts upward pressure on the already high apartment prices.
NEWS
September 10, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The gates of hell have opened, and the ghosts are hungry and restless. In a ceremony to placate unsettled spirits, a ribbon of red-robed Taoist priests unfurls through a hillside neighborhood where narrow streets slice into the slope like terraced rice fields. Sweating under their robes, the priests circuit the area's temples, horns whining, cymbals clashing, then pause for breath on the way up the steep streets.
NEWS
April 30, 1994 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rev. Dennis Balcombe, a Hong Kong-based faith healer known for his confrontational evangelism, has a history of provoking Chinese authorities. Police in Guangzhou (Canton) once detained him for conducting a weekly "English class" with only one textbook--the Bible. Another time, the 49-year-old American preacher says, he evaded arrest during an illegal outdoor prayer meeting by hiding under blankets in a Chinese burial cart.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I live here. I work here. It is my home. But now I must go and leave my world behind," said Cheung Muk-ching, a 66-year-old shop owner residing deep within the labyrinthine Walled City just north of Hong Kong's international airport. Cheung's neighborhood is a monument to man's ability to survive in adverse surroundings.
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