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BUSINESS
December 3, 1989
Thanks to Barbara Marcus for her Nov. 26 letter on crying babies in movie theaters. When my daughter was young, I missed many movies and concerts because I could not afford a baby-sitter. I realized that this was just part of being a parent. It is incomprehensible to me that this is lost on today's parents. It is grossly unfair that one crying baby spoils an event for hundreds of people.
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NEWS
January 3, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
In the decades after World War II, labor unions built their power on their ability to get things for their members--higher wages, stronger work rules, better health insurance, a federal job-safety agency. These days, by contrast, a labor leader is considered a success if he can simply make sure his members don't lose what they have. Which is why Domenic Bozzotto, the gruff president of Boston's 5,000-member hotel workers' union, has become a hero.
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NEWS
July 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
A House panel investigating the Department of Housing and Urban Development said Tuesday that it has agreed to postpone a second appearance by former HUD Secretary Samuel R. Pierce Jr. until mid-September. Pierce, who was scheduled to testify next week, requested the postponement, saying he needed more time to prepare for the hearing, said Rep. Tom Lantos (D-San Mateo), chairman of the House Government Operations subcommittee on employment and housing.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In recent days, a two-year-old plan to desegregate South Boston's all-white housing projects has evoked the emotions and angry rhetoric that ignited bloody riots during this racially tense city's school desegregation crisis of the mid-1970s. "The problem is, our kids who got screwed in the busing are getting screwed in housing," Leo Keaney, chairman of the Old Colony housing project tenants group, complained Friday. "When the hell does it stop? They keep coming at this community.
NEWS
July 12, 1988
Boston took a step toward integrating its public housing as two black families moved into a project in South Boston, a mostly white neighborhood that was torn by rioting during school desegregation in the mid-1970s. The two single mothers and their children settled into the Mary Ellen McCormack development without incident, becoming the only blacks in South Boston public housing and the first to move into the 1,016-unit facility in a decade, officials said.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In recent days, a two-year-old plan to desegregate South Boston's all-white housing projects has evoked the emotions and angry rhetoric that ignited bloody riots during this racially tense city's school desegregation crisis of the mid-1970s. "The problem is, our kids who got screwed in the busing are getting screwed in housing," Leo Keaney, chairman of the Old Colony housing project tenants group, complained Friday. "When the hell does it stop? They keep coming at this community.
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
In the decades after World War II, labor unions built their power on their ability to get things for their members--higher wages, stronger work rules, better health insurance, a federal job-safety agency. These days, by contrast, a labor leader is considered a success if he can simply make sure his members don't lose what they have. Which is why Domenic Bozzotto, the gruff president of Boston's 5,000-member hotel workers' union, has become a hero.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
The NAACP will drop its lawsuit against the Boston Housing Authority under a settlement signed Wednesday that could cost the city $3 million for alleged housing discrimination. The largest group of public housing discrimination victims eligible for up to $2,500 each in damages includes 1,058 families who applied for apartments in predominantly white developments over the last decade, but were not given minority preference.
NEWS
November 29, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Francis Peter (Frank) Torino, an airline pilot who became a developer when he couldn't find a suitable South Bay apartment and went on to construct about 50,000 residential units in four states, has died. He was 72. Torino, who lived in Rolling Hills Estates, died Thursday after a 10-year battle with cancer. In the late 1950s, Torino's apartment search resulted in the purchase of a lot and construction of his first apartment building. He soon formed Torrance-based Torino Industries Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1994 | From Associated Press
A high court in Massachusetts has become an arbiter in a culture clash pitting religion against the sexual revolution. In a case that bears resemblance to others around the country, two Catholic brothers are facing charges of discrimination because they refused to rent an apartment to an unmarried couple. The brothers say they were following their religious beliefs, but the state says their rental business doesn't qualify as a religious activity.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1989
Thanks to Barbara Marcus for her Nov. 26 letter on crying babies in movie theaters. When my daughter was young, I missed many movies and concerts because I could not afford a baby-sitter. I realized that this was just part of being a parent. It is incomprehensible to me that this is lost on today's parents. It is grossly unfair that one crying baby spoils an event for hundreds of people.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
The NAACP will drop its lawsuit against the Boston Housing Authority under a settlement signed Wednesday that could cost the city $3 million for alleged housing discrimination. The largest group of public housing discrimination victims eligible for up to $2,500 each in damages includes 1,058 families who applied for apartments in predominantly white developments over the last decade, but were not given minority preference.
NEWS
July 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
A House panel investigating the Department of Housing and Urban Development said Tuesday that it has agreed to postpone a second appearance by former HUD Secretary Samuel R. Pierce Jr. until mid-September. Pierce, who was scheduled to testify next week, requested the postponement, saying he needed more time to prepare for the hearing, said Rep. Tom Lantos (D-San Mateo), chairman of the House Government Operations subcommittee on employment and housing.
NEWS
July 12, 1988
Boston took a step toward integrating its public housing as two black families moved into a project in South Boston, a mostly white neighborhood that was torn by rioting during school desegregation in the mid-1970s. The two single mothers and their children settled into the Mary Ellen McCormack development without incident, becoming the only blacks in South Boston public housing and the first to move into the 1,016-unit facility in a decade, officials said.
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