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June 21, 1988 | JAMES F. PELTZ, Times Staff Writer
It was 1947. The GIs were home from World War II, and housing was in short supply. Many veterans and their young families were forced to live with relatives, often in cramped city apartments. The suburbs? They were mostly for the rich and upper-middle class. But that year, a construction firm named Levitt & Sons, led by William J. Levitt, changed suburbia forever.
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NEWS
September 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Niagara Falls, N.Y., judge ruled that the sale of homes in the Love Canal chemical dump area may proceed, rejecting a bid by environmental and community groups to block the sales. State Justice Joseph Mintz lifted an injunction he imposed four years ago that forbade selling the homes until the state Health Department had studied whether the area was habitable. That study, finished last year, said contamination in a part of the area was no worse than in other parts of Niagara Falls.
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NEWS
August 14, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph E. Ceretto has found his dream house. He speaks rapturously of its beautiful woodwork, ample basement and fireplace. He notes its proximity to parks, baseball diamonds, churches and a major shopping mall. As if all that were not enough, the three-bedroom, ranch-style house is selling for about 20% below the prices he would expect to pay elsewhere in Niagara Falls. "It's really an excellent home," says the 28-year-old substitute teacher, who is single and living with his parents.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
Home-seekers flocked to the neighborhood surrounding the Love Canal toxic-waste dump Wednesday as a state agency put nine houses up for sale but refused to guarantee their safety in writing. "The area's been real quiet. It'll be nice to get neighbors back," said William Stevenson, one of about 70 people who stayed in the neighborhood rather than accept a government buyout during the late 1970s.
NEWS
August 18, 1988
The city of Yonkers, N.Y., got another temporary reprieve from financial disaster, as an appeals court extended a stay of the fines that had been ordered by a federal judge to punish the city for resisting his desegregation order. After a two-hour hearing, the three-judge panel said that the fines would be suspended pending its ruling, which appears to mean that Yonkers will pay no more penalties unless the appeals court upholds the judge.
NEWS
September 8, 1988
The city of Yonkers, N.Y., which faces $1 million-a-day fines starting Friday, will begin laying off hundreds of employees as part of a "doomsday plan" to delay bankruptcy, state officials said. The fines stem from the City Council's refusal to approve a housing desegregation plan ordered by a federal judge.
NEWS
November 20, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
David Burns, a Department of Housing and Urban Development official, was pressured into approving a housing project for the elderly to be built by a contributor to the campaign of Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (R-N.Y.) after D'Amato wrote the official's boss urging funding for the project, New York Newsday reported. D'Amato wrote New York HUD regional administrator Geraldine McGann July 22, 1988, urging funds for the $2.1-million project, HUD records show, the report said.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Niagara Falls, N.Y., judge ruled that the sale of homes in the Love Canal chemical dump area may proceed, rejecting a bid by environmental and community groups to block the sales. State Justice Joseph Mintz lifted an injunction he imposed four years ago that forbade selling the homes until the state Health Department had studied whether the area was habitable. That study, finished last year, said contamination in a part of the area was no worse than in other parts of Niagara Falls.
NEWS
August 16, 1988
The Yonkers City Council, risking fines that could bankrupt New York's fourth largest city within weeks, meeting late into the night voted for the second time to defy a federal desegregation order requiring construction of 1,000 units of public housing in predominantly white neighborhoods.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph E. Ceretto has found his dream house. He speaks rapturously of its beautiful woodwork, ample basement and fireplace. He notes its proximity to parks, baseball diamonds, churches and a major shopping mall. As if all that were not enough, the three-bedroom, ranch-style house is selling for about 20% below the prices he would expect to pay elsewhere in Niagara Falls. "It's really an excellent home," says the 28-year-old substitute teacher, who is single and living with his parents.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All during his successful race for mayor of Yonkers last fall, Councilman Henry Spallone predicted that the Supreme Court would overturn the stiff fines imposed by a federal judge on him and three other council members for their defiance of a court-ordered public housing desegregation plan. On Wednesday, by a 5-4 vote, the high tribunal made him a prophet. And, for Spallone and two of his City Council allies, it was a time for jubilation and toasts with pink champagne.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court imposed new limits Wednesday on the power of judges to enforce civil rights decrees, ruling in a bitterly contested Yonkers, N. Y., case that elected officials may not be fined personally, except as a last resort, to force their compliance. The 5-4 decision threw out the $500-a-day contempt fines levied by a federal judge against four Yonkers city councilmen who had defiantly refused to approve a housing desegregation plan in July, 1988.
NEWS
November 20, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
David Burns, a Department of Housing and Urban Development official, was pressured into approving a housing project for the elderly to be built by a contributor to the campaign of Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (R-N.Y.) after D'Amato wrote the official's boss urging funding for the project, New York Newsday reported. D'Amato wrote New York HUD regional administrator Geraldine McGann July 22, 1988, urging funds for the $2.1-million project, HUD records show, the report said.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
Housing and Urban Development Secretary Jack Kemp has made a "multimillion-dollar commitment" to help resolve a longstanding housing desegregation case in Yonkers, N.Y. He would not specify the amount of U.S. funds involved. Kemp's actions include approval of construction, on five sites, of 142 new units of public housing in Yonkers.
NEWS
June 9, 1989
The Department of Housing and Urban Development will reopen a probe into an alleged scheme to rig the awarding of federally subsidized housing in Island Park, N.Y., HUD Secretary Jack Kemp announced. At the center of the controversy is HUD Region II administrator Geraldine McGann, whose son, Daniel McGann, was among those chosen to purchase a $44,500 house in the program. A cousin of Republican Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato, a longtime resident of Island Park, also benefited from the program by buying a home for $40,000, according to a HUD audit.
NEWS
March 7, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court agreed Monday to belatedly enter last summer's bitter Yonkers, N.Y., desegregation dispute, in which city officials claim that a federal judge used fines to punish them for representing the voters who elected them. The Yonkers case began in 1985, when Judge Leonard Sand found the city guilty of segregating its public housing. City officials initially agreed to remedy that problem by building public housing in some of its nearly all-white neighborhoods.
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