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NEWS
May 7, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Ohio State University's School of Architecture calls it one of the most complete accumulations of early 1800s homes still intact in America. "German Village is the charm that Columbus used to be. It keeps the present in the past," said Mary Louise Hendricks, 76, who has lived her entire life in the historic enclave in Ohio's capital city. In the 1950s, the restored village of 1,600 houses, built in the 1830s, '40s and '50s, was a decaying neighborhood less than a 10-minute walk from downtown Columbus.
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BUSINESS
May 6, 2003 | Jesus Sanchez, Times Staff Writer
Ryland Group Inc. said Monday that it had stopped selling homes in an Ohio subdivision after about 20 homeowners sued the Calabasas-based home builder over hazardous levels of lead found in the soil. Home sales were halted late last week at Lexington Manor, a 46-lot development near Cincinnati that was built on the site of a former shooting range. The home buyers contend that tests conducted on the site have detected lead in concentrations far in excess of federal and state safety standards.
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NEWS
May 15, 1988 | MITCH WEISS, Associated Press
At dusk, the narrow roads and footpaths leading to the settlement of Galatea are disturbed only by barking dogs and shadows of tree limbs dancing in the steady wind. It's a far cry from the traffic of a century ago, when the small settlement just north of this Wood County village was a thriving oil town. From the late 1880s until the early 1900s, hundreds of people worked at an oil refinery.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Ohio State University's School of Architecture calls it one of the most complete accumulations of early 1800s homes still intact in America. "German Village is the charm that Columbus used to be. It keeps the present in the past," said Mary Louise Hendricks, 76, who has lived her entire life in the historic enclave in Ohio's capital city. In the 1950s, the restored village of 1,600 houses, built in the 1830s, '40s and '50s, was a decaying neighborhood less than a 10-minute walk from downtown Columbus.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2003 | Jesus Sanchez, Times Staff Writer
Ryland Group Inc. said Monday that it had stopped selling homes in an Ohio subdivision after about 20 homeowners sued the Calabasas-based home builder over hazardous levels of lead found in the soil. Home sales were halted late last week at Lexington Manor, a 46-lot development near Cincinnati that was built on the site of a former shooting range. The home buyers contend that tests conducted on the site have detected lead in concentrations far in excess of federal and state safety standards.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2008 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Whoever wins the crucial Ohio Democratic presidential primary Tuesday, thanks will probably be owed to the likes of Jim Aldrich, a 61-year-old union worker at the Glatfelter paper mill on the southern edge of this small industrial city. But even Aldrich doesn't know from whom to collect the "thank you," because he still hasn't decided what he is going to do in the voting booth.
REAL ESTATE
October 30, 1994 | LAURA HENNING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Henning is a Long Beach free - lance writer. and
In his quiet moments, Bob Goldstone is haunted by an admittedly irrational but visceral fear. The Palos Verdes Peninsula realtor imagines that after he dies his mentally impaired adult son will be left to wander the streets alone. And because no one gives him his medications, he succumbs to epileptic seizures. "When I'm gone, it's permanent," Goldstone said. "I can't come back for another day and take care of this person. I have to do what I can for him now."
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | MITCH WEISS, Associated Press
At dusk, the narrow roads and footpaths leading to the settlement of Galatea are disturbed only by barking dogs and shadows of tree limbs dancing in the steady wind. It's a far cry from the traffic of a century ago, when the small settlement just north of this Wood County village was a thriving oil town. From the late 1880s until the early 1900s, hundreds of people worked at an oil refinery.
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