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NEWS
July 31, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One hand resting on a polished mahogany table, the other gesturing grandly toward an appliance-filled kitchen, Leonid Volodarsky proudly repeated his favorite movie sound bite. "As Dorothy said when the tornado blew her to Oz, 'Toto, I don't think we're in Kansas anymore,' " he recited, beaming and rocking his feet on the plush gray wall-to-wall carpet.
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WORLD
February 28, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama said Friday that he is “deeply concerned” by reports of Russian military activity within Ukraine and warned “there will be costs” for any intervention, urging Moscow to use restraint as the former Soviet state struggles to forge a new government. “Any violation of Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity would be deeply destabilizing, which is not in the interests of Ukraine, Russia or Europe,” Obama said in an unscheduled statement from the White House briefing room.
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NEWS
January 18, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bemoaning the dissolution of the Soviet Union, more than 5,000 military officers demanded Friday that the former Soviet armed forces remain unified and battle-ready under a single command. Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin tried his best to woo the officers, one of the country's most conservative and well-organized forces. He committed himself in strong terms to try to prevent the military's breakup and promised to improve officers' housing.
WORLD
September 21, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush urged Russia's top officials both in telephone calls and in person Friday to support a stringent U.N. resolution against Iraq but apparently found little success in softening their resistance. Russian Foreign Minister Igor S. Ivanov did emphasize that Moscow agrees Baghdad must comply with U.N. Security Council demands that international inspectors be permitted a free rein to search for biological, chemical and nuclear weapons.
NEWS
June 11, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin, adding a touch of populism Friday to his free-market reforms, announced steps to provide millions of Russians with new homes and to protect them from ruin by financiers promising fabulous returns on their savings. "It is an impermissible situation whereby the majority of the population cannot afford to buy an apartment," he told a Kremlin news conference. "Every individual has to be given a chance."
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mikhail Kapustin first moved his wife and four daughters into a new apartment at 81 Leninsky Prospekt, they were greeted by withering glances and whispered warnings. "Don't let us catch you lighting up in the elevator!" neighbors cautioned the nonsmokers. Kapustin's wife, Lyudmilla, was haughtily informed that residents refrain from hanging laundry on the balconies and take care to neatly dispose of their trash.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Army Lt. Alexander Maly, a 22-year-old platoon commander, is about to benefit from the Clinton Administration's multibillion-dollar effort to reform Russia. As far as Maly's concerned, it's about time. After two years in a cramped dormitory, the lieutenant is No. 36 on a waiting list for the 128 free apartments in a twin-tower high-rise, one of six housing projects being built with U.S. aid for officers slated to be discharged from Russia's shrinking army.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | Carol J. Williams
* The Communist-era promise--Under guidelines lingering from the Communist era, every Russian family is promised a separate house or apartment with a minimum of 130 square feet per person. Yet across the Russian Federation, 7 million families--14% of the population--never received that minimum space. In St. Petersburg, families on lists awaiting adequate housing now get by with an average of 60 square feet per person.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swindled home buyers are legion in the fledgling Russian real estate market, so it was something of a surprise when the latest victims of failed development schemes discovered that reputable realty agents were huddling over how to come to their rescue. Five established realty firms that built custom apartment projects have collapsed in as many months in this czarist-era capital, leaving nearly 2,000 would-be buyers somewhere short of a new threshold.
NEWS
April 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
The self-proclaimed new managers of NTV, Russia's only nationwide independent television network, today changed the security guards, fired journalists who rejected their authority and took the station off the air in the midst of the morning news broadcast. The first real sign of the impact of the seizure of NTV's airwaves came at 8:06 a.m., when anchor Andrei Norkin was cut off in midsentence as he attempted to explain what had happened when the new managers arrived.
NEWS
April 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
The self-proclaimed new managers of NTV, Russia's only nationwide independent television network, today changed the security guards, fired journalists who rejected their authority and took the station off the air in the midst of the morning news broadcast. The first real sign of the impact of the seizure of NTV's airwaves came at 8:06 a.m., when anchor Andrei Norkin was cut off in midsentence as he attempted to explain what had happened when the new managers arrived.
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia seized the moral high ground on nuclear nonproliferation Friday when the lower house of parliament ratified the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty--which the U.S. Senate rejected last year. The Duma's approval of the pact, just one week after lawmakers ended seven years of foot-dragging by endorsing the START II arms-control treaty, was yet another sign of the strength of Russian President-elect Vladimir V. Putin, who has put nuclear arms reduction at the center of his foreign policy.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swindled home buyers are legion in the fledgling Russian real estate market, so it was something of a surprise when the latest victims of failed development schemes discovered that reputable realty agents were huddling over how to come to their rescue. Five established realty firms that built custom apartment projects have collapsed in as many months in this czarist-era capital, leaving nearly 2,000 would-be buyers somewhere short of a new threshold.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mikhail Kapustin first moved his wife and four daughters into a new apartment at 81 Leninsky Prospekt, they were greeted by withering glances and whispered warnings. "Don't let us catch you lighting up in the elevator!" neighbors cautioned the nonsmokers. Kapustin's wife, Lyudmilla, was haughtily informed that residents refrain from hanging laundry on the balconies and take care to neatly dispose of their trash.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | Carol J. Williams
* The Communist-era promise--Under guidelines lingering from the Communist era, every Russian family is promised a separate house or apartment with a minimum of 130 square feet per person. Yet across the Russian Federation, 7 million families--14% of the population--never received that minimum space. In St. Petersburg, families on lists awaiting adequate housing now get by with an average of 60 square feet per person.
NEWS
June 11, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin, adding a touch of populism Friday to his free-market reforms, announced steps to provide millions of Russians with new homes and to protect them from ruin by financiers promising fabulous returns on their savings. "It is an impermissible situation whereby the majority of the population cannot afford to buy an apartment," he told a Kremlin news conference. "Every individual has to be given a chance."
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | Associated Press
Hurricane-force winds blew off house roofs and killed one person and injured several others in a Volga River city, the Tass news agency reported Friday.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawmakers elected a close ally of President Boris N. Yeltsin as Speaker of Russia's equivalent of the U.S. Senate on Thursday in a sign that the legislative body will be more conciliatory than the old Parliament, which Yeltsin dissolved in September. First Deputy Prime Minister Vladimir F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1994
President Boris N. Yeltsin has formed a new Cabinet that swings his government unmistakably to the right, raising worrisome questions about the very survival of Russia's economic reforms. This ominous shift was prompted in good part by the strong showing in last month's parliamentary elections by ultranationalists and communists, who appealed to a public left anxious and frustrated by policies to redirect Russia toward a market economy.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawmakers elected a close ally of President Boris N. Yeltsin as Speaker of Russia's equivalent of the U.S. Senate on Thursday in a sign that the legislative body will be more conciliatory than the old Parliament, which Yeltsin dissolved in September. First Deputy Prime Minister Vladimir F.
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