Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHousing Security
IN THE NEWS

Housing Security

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
There's new teeth in the city's law governing false alarms. Failing to pay fees for repeated false alarms from home security systems will soon become a criminal offense. Police charge residents $50 after their third false alarm; about $39,600 was billed in 1997. But about 24% of that amount, or $9,420, remains due. There is $570 and $340 outstanding from 1996 and 1995, respectively. "City staff has diligently tried to collect these overdue assessments," a municipal report states.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
October 14, 2012 | By Los Angeles Times
ATMA, Syria - The rows of olive groves that line the hillsides like silent sentinels are bursting with life, both on the laden branches and the fruit-scattered ground below, where families camp out on mattresses and in tents. The trees appear healthy. The people are desperate. "We don't have enough food, we don't have proper shelter," a mother said as she spoon-fed donated lentil soup to her infant son the other day. "What will we do with winter coming?" The hundreds living amid the olive groves on the edges of this rebel-held town hugging the Turkish-Syrian border are among the 1.5 million Syrians left homeless in the conflict but still living in Syria.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They have known the violence and pain of long lives. Clarence Davis, 75, survived World War II, then lost a leg to diabetes. Dorris Blue, 72, mothered 11 children; four died, two in Vietnam. Chlora Jones, who celebrated her 107th birthday recently, has outlived every member of her family. Agnes Senegal, 80, and Minnie Lee Adams, 63, were living in Watts in 1965.
NATIONAL
September 20, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department's inspector general testified on Capitol Hill on Thursday that a top national security official refused to cooperate with his investigation into the failed Fast and Furious gun-tracking operation and whether there were any links to the White House. Michael E. Horowitz, whose 471-page report released Wednesday outlined a series of systemic problems at the Justice Department and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, told a House oversight committee that then-White House national security assistant Kevin O'Reilly had refused to voluntarily submit to an interview.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1990
The biggest rental complex in Los Angeles, the Westside's Park La Brea, will be off limits to outsiders beginning later this month, when it will be converted into a fenced and guarded community. Only Park La Brea's 10,000 residents, their guests, workers and emergency vehicles will be permitted to drive freely through the gates once the new policy is in place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1989 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles officials Thursday unveiled a new trespassing ordinance designed to help rid the city's 21 housing projects of drug dealers and gang members, the majority of whom, officials say, live outside the projects but use them as havens. Also Thursday, Gary W. Squier, executive director of the Housing Authority, disclosed that the city already has begun building an eight-foot wrought iron security fence around the Jordan Downs housing project in Watts to help keep out non-residents.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
The Rolling Hills subdivision in Laguna Niguel, a comfortable enclave of $500,000 tract homes, is a place where young professionals can raise families in quiet seclusion from the frenetic pace of south Orange County. But the residents, not satisfied with the privacy that comes from their many limited-access cul-de-sac streets, are taking steps to surround the 315-home subdivision with fences and electronic gates.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's there every night on the local news: gruesome footage of police officers inspecting crime scenes while paramedics wheel bodies out of otherwise tranquil neighborhoods. For years, the fear created by such images has been motivating those with the means to invest in high-tech home security systems. Now the frightened are going beyond the magnetic devices and infrared sensors that detect unauthorized entrances and movement within a home. They're going to people like Kim Bowers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1995
Re "A White House Moat: The Clear Symbolism," editorial, May 22: I predict a more optimistic future than you, and that the White House "moat" is only a five- to eight-year fixture. Yes, we have too many guns, too many seriously disturbed people, too much hate talk, too many people appealing to the baser motives of people and succeeding. The fanatic lurch to the right in religion and politics is no accident. It happens every thousand years. By the turn of the century, the right-wing wackos will realize that Jesus didn't arrive, the end of the world they predicted was upon us didn't happen and they will return to the dark holes of fear and superstition from whence they came.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1987
Congressman Howard Berman (D-Panorama City) toured two of Pacoima's largest federally funded housing projects Tuesday, promising tenants that he and local housing officials will seek funding to improve security and provide more recreational facilities for youngsters at the complexes.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2011 | By David Sarno and Salvador Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
As hackers continue their rampage against the world's largest banks, defense contractors and technology companies, executives and government officials are confronting a sobering truth: The bad guys are winning. The seemingly unending string of high-profile attacks, most recently against Citigroup Inc. and Sony Corp., have shown that nearly every organization is vulnerable to a growing contingent of well-trained and agile attackers who are finding security holes faster than they can be plugged.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Peter King and his fellow Republicans in the House declared their much-criticized hearing into Muslim "radicalization" in America a success, even as detractors slammed it as an "outrage" and "reality TV. " "Our hearings today were informative and educational and hopefully will have consequences in the Muslim American community," King, chairman of the Homeland Security Committee, told reporters after the more than four-hour hearing...
NATIONAL
March 19, 2010 | By Christi Parsons
The Obama administration plans to purchase a state prison in rural Thomson, Ill., regardless of whether Congress allows terrorism suspects to be transferred there, a Justice Department official said Thursday. In a letter to a member of the Illinois congressional delegation, Assistant Atty. Gen. Ronald Weich spelled out the administration's intent to go ahead with plans to buy the nearly empty Thomson prison, even if lawmakers refuse to approve its use as a new home for detainees at the military-run prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2009 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Mark Silva
A contrite Secret Service director today accepted the blame for a breach of security that enabled an uninvited Virginia couple to gain access to a state dinner at the White House, as members of Congress spoke of compelling the White House social secretary to testify as well. Three members of the Secret Service have been placed on paid administrative leave for the breach of security, Secret Service Director Mark Sullivan said, maintaining that the security breakdown was not an institutional problem.
OPINION
June 16, 2008 | Jeremy Scahill, Jeremy Scahill is the author of "Blackwater: The Rise of the World's Most Powerful Mercenary Army."
From California to Iraq, business has never been better for the controversial private security firm Blackwater Worldwide. Company President Gary Jackson recently boasted that Blackwater has "had two successive quarters of unprecedented growth." Owner Erik Prince recently spun his company as the "FedEx" of the U.S. national security apparatus, describing Blackwater as a "robust temp agency."
NATIONAL
November 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Air Force fighter jets scrambled to intercept a private plane that flew too close to the White House, setting off a security scare that led Vice President Dick Cheney and President Bush's chief of staff, Andrew H. Card Jr., to be moved to a secure location. The plane was later determined not to be a threat. The president and the first lady were away at the time. The pilot landed in Siler City, N.C., and allowed authorities to search the plane, a Secret Service spokesman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1985 | JAN KLUNDER, Times Staff Writer
Prosecutors have begun to outline their case against the owner of three suspected cocaine "rock houses" by documenting the tight security at the houses and producing testimony that drugs were sold there. Employees of several security companies testified Wednesday at a preliminary hearing for Jeffrey A. Bryant, 33, of Pacoima that Bryant hired them to install steel doors and window bars on three houses he owns in Pacoima.
NEWS
September 14, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The investigation into the plane crash on the White House grounds has revealed widespread confusion about the obligations of federal aviation officials to notify the Secret Service when an aircraft may be about to violate the security zone around the White House.
NEWS
October 24, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS and FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The nation's anthrax scare escalated Tuesday as traces of the deadly bacterium were detected at an off-site mail facility serving the White House and the number of life-threatening infections continued to climb, spurring health officials to immediately begin antibiotic treatments for thousands of postal workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
There's new teeth in the city's law governing false alarms. Failing to pay fees for repeated false alarms from home security systems will soon become a criminal offense. Police charge residents $50 after their third false alarm; about $39,600 was billed in 1997. But about 24% of that amount, or $9,420, remains due. There is $570 and $340 outstanding from 1996 and 1995, respectively. "City staff has diligently tried to collect these overdue assessments," a municipal report states.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|