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Housing Shortages

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NEWS
June 13, 1991 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Los Angeles is running out of space to build new homes, according to figures released Wednesday by the Los Angeles Department of City Planning. The figures show that under present zoning laws, the city has space for just over 1.4 million housing units and already has built about 1.3 million. To keep up with population growth, the city should be able to house about 25,000 new families a year, said Gary Squire, the city's housing chief.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien and Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - It's becoming a familiar scene in everybody's favorite city - luxury shuttles with Wi-Fi and plush seats barreling past sluggish, dilapidated city buses crammed with local residents standing elbow to elbow. The nerd convoy, ferrying workers to technology companies in Silicon Valley, has raised the ire of civic activists who see it as a symbol of a divide between the haves and have nots as the region's tech boom has sent housing costs and evictions soaring. But as heated as that backlash has become at times, it has obscured a much broader story that these buses have to tell about changes sweeping across not just San Francisco but also the entire Bay Area.
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NEWS
September 10, 1987 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
Southern California home buyers, already bedeviled by an acute shortage of existing houses for sale, have received more bad news in recent days as interest rates on fixed-payment home mortgage loans have soared well above 11% in their second major surge this year. "This is bad timing" for anyone buying a home, said Robert K. Heady, publisher of Bank Rate Monitor in North Palm Beach, Fla.
OPINION
July 12, 2013 | By Christopher Thornberg
If you haven't heard, another major housing development in Los Angeles has been substantially scaled back as a result of local interest groups and the support they receive from populist politicians. Casden West L.A. was planning to build more than 600 housing units with 160,000 square feet of retail space in West Los Angeles on the new Metro Expo Line. Yet after years of wrangling with various groups, the current plan calls for the retail space to be shrunk by 90% and the number of residences reduced by 7%. Of the residences, more than 10% will have an "affordable" status, meaning other units will be priced commensurately higher to subsidize them.
NEWS
July 3, 1988 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
When the imposing Bay Towers apartments were built on a grassy field overlooking Boston harbor in 1974, they seemed to be an ingenious solution to an old urban problem: decent housing for low-income people at a price that developers could afford. The harbor-side high-rise, constructed with private funds backed by federal mortgage subsidies, offered rents of $200 to $300 for working-class tenants, largely of Irish descent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1998
It annoys me every time someone refers to the current real estate situation in California as a housing shortage (Aug. 30). There is no housing shortage in California! What we have here is an overabundance of people! Why must a house be provided for everyone who wants to come here? What's wrong with posting "Sorry, No Vacancy" signs at the border? How many more millions of people are we going to allow the land developers to cram into California before we say enough? Our goal should be zero population growth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1990
Eighteen months ago the Los Angeles City Council, confronted with a rising problem of abandoned homes serving as crack houses, passed an ordinance allowing the city to demolish uninhabitable properties without delay. That prompted Mayor Bradley to launch Operation Knockdown, which took dead aim at derelict buildings that served as havens for drug users and street gangs.
REAL ESTATE
November 17, 1991 | PATRICK H. HARE, Hare is a Washington, D.C., consultant who specializes in accessory units.
There is a form of affordable housing that requires no tax subsidy, is integrated into single-family neighborhoods and is accepted in prestigious communities. It not only helps tenants, but also elderly homeowners, single-parent homeowners, young home buyers and others. This type of housing, known as accessory units, or in California, as second units, consists of both apartments and cottages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1988
The number of people 65 years old and older in Los Angeles County is expected to reach more than 1 million by the year 2000 and many will not be able to find housing, according to a report by the county's Senior Citizen's Housing Task Force. The task force findings, which were released Tuesday, predict that the senior population, which accounted for less than 10% of the county's 7.5 million residents in 1980, will make up 11.8% of the county population at the turn of the century.
SPORTS
August 8, 1987 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Pre-competition controversy at international sports events is about as predictable as records in swimming. The tempest in the teapot at the Pan American Games is a shortage of housing for the athletes. Pan Am and U.S. Olympic officials apparently decided that fewer athletes would show than had signed up. Surprise, Indianapolis. All the RSVPs for this party were true to their word.
WORLD
August 11, 2011 | By Batsheva Sobelman, Los Angeles Times
Israel's Interior Ministry approved plans Thursday for 1,600 new housing units in a development built on annexed land in East Jerusalem, a construction project that angered Obama administration officials when it was announced last year. The move also strains relations with Palestinians as they prepared to seek recognition of statehood at the United Nations next month. Interior Minister Eli Yishai suggested that expanding the Ramat Shlomo project was aimed at alleviating a housing shortage that helped spark a wave of protest in the last month by Israelis seeking social and economic reforms.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2004 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
California's housing shortage is primarily confined to Los Angeles, Orange County, San Diego and the San Francisco Bay Area and may not be as intense as previously thought, according to a study to be released today. There is little evidence of a housing crunch outside these popular -- and densely populated -- urban and suburban markets, said the Public Policy Institute of California, a nonpartisan San Francisco think tank that researches economic, social and political issues.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2002 | Jesus Sanchez, Times Staff Writer
An unexpected burst of sales boosted Southern California home prices by 21% in November, the biggest year-over-year increase since the peak of the last housing boom in 1989, according to new figures released Wednesday. The jump in the overall median price of new and existing houses and condominiums sold, to a record $288,000, showed that Southern California's housing market is still on a roll despite the gloomy economy and the possibility of a war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2001 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County cities could begin running out of room for new housing years before voter-approved anti-sprawl measures are set to expire, a new study says. The study by the Los Angeles-based Reason Public Policy Institute and Ventura-based Solimar Research Group predicts that Camarillo and Simi Valley could reach build-out in 2004, Moorpark and Thousand Oaks by 2008 and Ventura by 2010 if current land use and development patterns continue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2001 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staff shortages, poor planning and a lack of adequate equipment have made it impossible for the Los Angeles Housing Department to inspect all apartment buildings once every three years, as required by city law, according to an audit released Tuesday by the city controller's office. "Before the city initiates a service or program, we should very carefully determine what resources are needed to operate successfully," City Controller Laura Chick wrote in the audit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY and DANIEL YI and HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California cities are among the most crowded in the nation, as high housing prices and a chronic apartment shortage have forced families to double up and homeowners to rent bedrooms and garages. Crowding detailed in the latest U.S. census can be seen especially in largely Latino cities that have become major ports of entry for poor immigrants seeking a better life.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1990 | John O'Dell, Times staff writer
They don't claim to know when the housing slump will end, but builders attending the biennial Barratt Business Round Table earlier this week in Irvine agree that when it does, it will go out with a bang. The end of the current economic slump and an increase in the demand for homes in Southern California's coastal counties will be accompanied by a tremendous housing shortage and yet another burst of price inflation, said Mark Frazier, president of Barratt America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2000 | TERESA WATANABE
Calling the nation's affordable-housing shortage a "moral and social disaster," more than 375 religious leaders have urged President Clinton and other political leaders to use the Federal Housing Administration's $5-billion surplus to help end the crisis. In a letter issued this week, the leaders said they were "deeply troubled" that the problem was being ignored despite unprecedented economic prosperity.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what would be the largest investment of its kind in California history, the Democrats who rule the Assembly unveiled a $1-billion plan Thursday to help relieve the state's chronic housing shortage. The proposal would help people buy homes and fund a sweeping array of housing initiatives touching Californians in every corner of the state--from farm workers in the Central Valley to teachers in Los Angeles to dot-com employees in Silicon Valley.
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