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NEWS
February 9, 1989
The Federal National Mortgage Assn. and an organization of local housing officials announced a pilot program selling foreclosed homes to local agencies for use by low- and moderate-income families. The first sales will be in four Texas cities and in Denver. Officials said they hope to expand the program throughout the country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
AUSTIN, Texas  - When it comes to turning Texas red to blue - or, at the least, a less-hostile shade of purple - Democrats face a quandary of the chicken-or-egg variety. Many are certain the political evolution from its current Republican dominance is inevitable, given the state's rapidly shifting demographics, led by the explosive growth of Latino and Asian populations. Not so, say Republicans, who believe hard work and greater minority outreach can preserve the GOP's power and keep Texas in its presidential column a good long time.
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NEWS
January 19, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, turning away appeals from civil rights lawyers, let stand a ruling Monday in a closely watched Dallas case that blocks the building of public housing units in mostly white neighborhoods. Over the last decade, the justices have restricted sharply the use of race-based affirmative action. In the Dallas case, those restrictions were used for the first time to halt the integration of public housing.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2005 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
Sometime this summer, the archives of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Norman Mailer will be trucked to central Texas from the warehouse in Pennsylvania where the 20,000 pounds of letters, manuscripts and memorabilia collected over seven often-turbulent decades have been stored. Purchased for $2.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | LIANNE HART and RAY DELGADO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal officials Thursday moved four black families into an all-white public housing complex in Vidor, Tex., that had been seized by the government when an earlier integration attempt failed. Police stood guard as three moving vans and at least three carloads of black motorists drove up to the 74-unit complex. Housing and Urban Development officials said four families--two single women with children, one single woman and one single man--moved into the complex before dawn.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
AUSTIN, Texas  - When it comes to turning Texas red to blue - or, at the least, a less-hostile shade of purple - Democrats face a quandary of the chicken-or-egg variety. Many are certain the political evolution from its current Republican dominance is inevitable, given the state's rapidly shifting demographics, led by the explosive growth of Latino and Asian populations. Not so, say Republicans, who believe hard work and greater minority outreach can preserve the GOP's power and keep Texas in its presidential column a good long time.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2000 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The plastic chairs, the signs in equal measure harsh and silly, meal trays dolloped with bleak-looking lumps--all faithfully depicted maximum-security decor. But Saturday at artist Richard Kamler's installation titled "The Waiting Room," in Sam Houston Memorial Museum, it was the meeting in the room next-door that best evoked the desperation surrounding America's death rows.
OPINION
January 21, 2001 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Davenport Institute for Public Policy at Pepperdine University and a research fellow in urban studies at the Reason Public Policy Institute. He is the author of "The New Geography: How the Digital Revolution Is Reshaping the American Landscape."
The inauguration of George W. Bush as president raises profound questions about the balance of regional power in post-industrial America. For nearly a generation, California has been the cutting-edge nation-state, the dominant shaper of the nation's political, economic and social culture. But now, with Texans firmly in command of the White House, a shift toward the Lone Star State may be in the offing. This is more than merely a contest between battling political elites.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2005 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
Sometime this summer, the archives of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Norman Mailer will be trucked to central Texas from the warehouse in Pennsylvania where the 20,000 pounds of letters, manuscripts and memorabilia collected over seven often-turbulent decades have been stored. Purchased for $2.
REAL ESTATE
November 6, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
California cities are nowhere to be found on Coldwell Banker's list of the 10 most affordable college towns, but they lead the field of the least affordable. Those schools ranked as having the most affordable housing include Texas Tech in Lubbock, Texas, where the median home price was $164,133; Mississippi State, Starkville, Miss., $169,433; Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La., $173,317; and Notre Dame, South Bend, Ind., $173,600.
OPINION
January 21, 2001 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Davenport Institute for Public Policy at Pepperdine University and a research fellow in urban studies at the Reason Public Policy Institute. He is the author of "The New Geography: How the Digital Revolution Is Reshaping the American Landscape."
The inauguration of George W. Bush as president raises profound questions about the balance of regional power in post-industrial America. For nearly a generation, California has been the cutting-edge nation-state, the dominant shaper of the nation's political, economic and social culture. But now, with Texans firmly in command of the White House, a shift toward the Lone Star State may be in the offing. This is more than merely a contest between battling political elites.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2000 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The plastic chairs, the signs in equal measure harsh and silly, meal trays dolloped with bleak-looking lumps--all faithfully depicted maximum-security decor. But Saturday at artist Richard Kamler's installation titled "The Waiting Room," in Sam Houston Memorial Museum, it was the meeting in the room next-door that best evoked the desperation surrounding America's death rows.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, turning away appeals from civil rights lawyers, let stand a ruling Monday in a closely watched Dallas case that blocks the building of public housing units in mostly white neighborhoods. Over the last decade, the justices have restricted sharply the use of race-based affirmative action. In the Dallas case, those restrictions were used for the first time to halt the integration of public housing.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | LIANNE HART and RAY DELGADO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal officials Thursday moved four black families into an all-white public housing complex in Vidor, Tex., that had been seized by the government when an earlier integration attempt failed. Police stood guard as three moving vans and at least three carloads of black motorists drove up to the 74-unit complex. Housing and Urban Development officials said four families--two single women with children, one single woman and one single man--moved into the complex before dawn.
NEWS
February 9, 1989
The Federal National Mortgage Assn. and an organization of local housing officials announced a pilot program selling foreclosed homes to local agencies for use by low- and moderate-income families. The first sales will be in four Texas cities and in Denver. Officials said they hope to expand the program throughout the country.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1996 | Jesus Sanchez
Kaufman & Broad Home Corp. is best known as a builder of sprawling suburban developments brimming with red-tile-roofed homes. But the Los Angeles-based home builder appears to be achieving success in another lesser-known but fast-growing venture: low-income housing. Since entering the market two years ago, the Los Angeles-based company has built more than 3,000 apartments for low- and moderate-income residents in California, Colorado and Utah.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2013 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- California's jobless rate was unchanged at 9.8% in January, and that lack of improvement put the Golden State in a tie with Rhode Island for the worst unemployment in the land. On the other end of the spectrum, North Dakota had the lowest jobless rate, 3.3%, the government said Monday in releasing updated and revised employment data for all 50 states. These statistics, based on more complete payroll information, show that California and other states in the western half of the country did much better in job growth over the last 12 months, powered by the energy sector, technology, trade with Asia and a rebounding housing market.
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