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Housing Tract

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REAL ESTATE
March 19, 1989 | DAVID M. KINCHEN and From staff reports
Declining enrollment in the schools of Laguna Beach and the need to finance improvements on the city's remaining four schools forced the school board in the city of nearly 25,000 to sell a 20-acre site to a developer. M.J. Brock & Sons Inc., Laguna Hills, plans to flatten a 7-acre knoll on the site to build 36 tract houses. The site, above the city's Top of the World neighborhood, is the highest point in Laguna Beach, at 1,031 feet above sea level.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The city of Carson has declared a local emergency over contamination in a sprawling housing tract, ratcheting up the pressure on Shell Oil to cleanse the neighborhood of the toxic chemicals found in the soil around homes. City officials hope the declaration will allow them greater authority to order the oil company to complete the cleanup of the site or give them access to federal and state assistance. For years, residents in the Carousel housing tract have complained about the contamination.
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NEWS
September 15, 1988
The City Council has tentatively rejected a proposal to build 250 homes in the city's foothills. Council members said they were concerned about the appearance of the homes and the loss of vegetation. Lewis Homes of California appealed to the council to overturn a city Planning Commission recommendation that the company be denied permission to build the 217.5-acre project. The council ordered that public hearings on the project be held at its Tuesday meetings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc
Carson city officials are seeking to declare a local emergency in an effort to pressure the state and an oil company to speed the cleanup of a contaminated housing tract where residents have been advised not to eat vegetables or fruit from their yards and to limit contact with the soil. Testing in 2008 revealed that the soil and groundwater beneath many of the 285 homes in the Carousel tract, which sits atop a former Shell Oil tank farm, contain benzene and petroleum. The oil company, which owned the land before it was developed into homes and which state officials said was responsible for its cleanup, has said that the chemicals do not pose an immediate health risk.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | MICHELE FUETSCH
The City Council unanimously overturned a Planning Commission recommendation this week and approved what will be the second-largest single-family housing development built in the city in at least 15 years. The 142 detached homes will be built on the 14.2-acre site of the old Compton Drive-in Theater on Rosecrans Avenue between Pannes and Thorson avenues. Located in the city's northeast corner, the new homes will sell at prices ranging from $140,000 to $180,000 each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1993 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
The Thousand Oaks Planning Commission has deadlocked 2-2 on whether to allow a group of residents to install gates at the entrances to their housing tract. The proposal would have placed mechanically operated barriers on Bowfield Street at Westview Court and Cherry Creek Circle, limiting access into the Braemar Gardens development. Residents of the development requested the gates as a safety measure and to prevent vandalism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1991 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mel Gibson and Danny Glover need houses to burn for their upcoming action movie "Lethal Weapon III." Lancaster has a half-built, abandoned housing tract that city officials would like to see leveled. Could it be a match made in Hollywood? The hottest scene since sets standing in for Atlanta were torched for "Gone With the Wind"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1991 | JOHN CHANDLER
Part of an abandoned, half-built housing tract in Lancaster will be burned to film the climax of the forthcoming movie, "Lethal Weapon III," under an agreement announced Wednesday. Officials with the federal Resolution Trust Corp., which acquired the rotting remains of the Legends tract from a failed savings and loan, said that Warner Bros. has agreed to pay a $25,000 fee and to later demolish any houses used in the filming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1994 | JEANNETTE REGALADO
They sure don't build them like they used to, declared Howard Grover, an original resident of an Encino housing tract that was one of the first in the San Fernando Valley. And considering how well the neighborhood held up in the Jan. 17 quake, for once it wasn't a cliche. "This old frame house rode it out beautifully," said Grover, who bought the first home on Burma Street in 1949.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1992 | PAUL A. CIOTTI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People came by the hundreds, as if to the site of a plane crash or cruise missile attack, standing there in parkas and boots in the dark frozen streets and fields next to a half-built and abandoned housing tract on the outskirts of Lancaster. They stared patiently at the "Lethal Weapon 3" film set, surrealistically bright under the distant massed light banks, waiting, waiting, waiting to see a movie company create a firestorm in a subdivision, a holocaust in their hometown.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2009 | By Roger Vincent
From his backyard, Joseph Leggett used to look out over the green, manicured fairways of the Palm Desert Country Club golf course. Lately, what he saw looked more like weedy vacant lots. Swaths of the championship course, deemed one of the best designed in the desert, turned brown as its owners searched for hundreds of thousands of dollars to reseed, reopen and rebound from Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. "The course is an eyesore," Leggett said recently. He estimated that his home of 30 years had lost half its value because of the ruined view.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2009 | David Zahniser
A real estate developer has won its legal battle to build 24 homes on a vacant hillside in the Los Angeles neighborhood of El Sereno -- and is now looking to recoup its financial losses from City Hall. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge James C. Chalfant ruled Monday that the City Council had no authority to order Monterey Hills Investors LLC to perform a new environmental impact report on its proposed subdivision of single-family homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2005 | Sara Lin, Times Staff Writer
Long before Orange County became known for pricey real estate, amusement parks and fancy malls, farms and farm animals were the norm. Horses were common, and renting one for a trail ride along the Santa Ana River or the undeveloped coastline was as easy as renting bicycles in Huntington Beach today. But as farmland gave way to planned communities and office parks, horse rentals went the way of orange groves and cattle ranches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2003 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
An Orange County home builder was charged Wednesday with diverting $340,000 in construction funds for his own use and unlawfully selling homes at a development in Altadena that was left unfinished. Timothy N. Roberts, freed on $175,000 bail after surrendering to authorities, will be arraigned Oct. 2 and could face up to 13 years in prison if convicted on all 16 felony counts, said Sandi Gibbons, spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County district attorney's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2003 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
These should be the best of times for San Juan Capistrano -- the swallows are on final approach, the mission's 15-year remodel is nearly complete and construction on what will be the town's first public high school in 40 years is but a few months away. But it's hard to find anyone in a partying mood. A yearlong debate over the merits of building an upscale housing tract and a public high school in the foothills east of the city's picturesque downtown has put folks on edge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2002 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ballot in San Juan Capistrano may soon become more crowded. Already deciding whether to sell city land to Home Depot and picking four council members, voters may also be asked this fall whether to block a large housing development. "This is probably the most full ballot in the history of the city," City Clerk Meg Monahan said. Three weeks ago, council members agreed to ask voters to cast an advisory vote Nov. 5 on whether the city should sell 13 acres to Home Depot for $9 million.
REAL ESTATE
March 6, 1988
A-M Homes has begun building Hillsboro, a 97-unit single-family housing tract at Southshore and Three Springs Drive in Westlake Village.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2001 | JOHN BALZAR
Almost half a century back, a sour newspaper columnist named Westbrook Pegler gazed at the future. He saw the future. He came upon a housing subdivision. He groaned, "How could they make the same mistake so many times?" Pegler could have been speaking of my housing tract, bulldozed out of a bean field 47 years ago in Long Beach, Calif. I just moved in. This is my fifth return to Southern California after assignments away. It's the only time I've settled in a tract house.
NEWS
June 26, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tom Day sees a lot to love about his family's brand new house. Perched in a high-end subdivision on this city's booming northeast fringe, the dun-hued Mediterranean boasts a castle-turret entry, a lofty master suite, a mesa-top view. But aesthetics aren't all that attracted Day. His new home will also help pay the power bill.
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