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NEWS
October 4, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rising out of the Kazakhstan steppe just southeast of this Central Asian coal mining city is a slice of the American dream: a private housing development. Although the land remains state-owned and supervised, the roughly 1,000 houses under construction here are the property of private Soviet citizens, who, much like millions of homeowners in the West, have taken out 25-year mortgages from the local bank to fulfill one of the most bourgeois of hopes.
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NEWS
February 22, 1988 | Associated Press
Soviet citizens will be allowed to take out large bank loans to build private homes under a government decree published Sunday that marks a major change in tackling the tenacious housing problem. The decree published in the Communist Party daily Pravda said the government hopes to "activate the human factor" and get Soviets to build their own homes with the help of government loans. It also calls on large industrial enterprises to take up a bigger share of the burden in providing housing.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one lives in the pleasant wooden house at 68 Lenin St. The spacious, lace-curtained dwelling that was the boyhood home of V. I. Lenin has been preserved in reverent tribute to his memory. A block away, at 6 Lev Tolstoy St., stands another monument to the Soviet founder. Here, in a nearly identical house, 27 families live packed together like prisoners, a mockery of the workers' paradise that Lenin promised would be the reward of his socialist state.
NEWS
September 5, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
When heavily laden trucks rumble by in the street outside, the children in Karush Pogosyan's family run for shelter. Usually, two dive under the bed, a third hides in a wooden wardrobe and the fourth, a cousin, runs about frantically, uncertain where she will be safe. "The earthquake--they remember the earthquake," Pogosyan said simply, recalling the Dec. 7, 1988, temblor that devastated Leninakan and a wide area of northern Soviet Armenia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1988 | ANDREA FORD, Times Staff Writer,
On the roof of the Casa Real apartments in West Hollywood on Monday, a delegation of Soviet housing officials were engaged in an exercise in irony. Huddled over a notebook, they scribbled diagrams as an American seismic engineer answered their questions through an interpreter. Delegation members were gathering data that they hope will help them earthquake-proof an apartment building in Kirovakan in the Soviet Republic of Armenia.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a legal watchdog committee declared Stalin-era residence restrictions unconstitutional last week, it appeared to move the Soviet Union a giant step closer to observing two basic human rights. With the hated propiska, or residence permit, virtually abolished, Soviet citizens would finally have full rights to live where they want and to choose their place of work. But it is not so simple. Demolishing the old Soviet system can be messy, even dangerous.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rising out of the Kazakhstan steppe just southeast of this Central Asian coal mining city is a slice of the American dream: a private housing development. Although the land remains state-owned and supervised, the roughly 1,000 houses under construction here are the property of private Soviet citizens, who, much like millions of homeowners in the West, have taken out 25-year mortgages from the local bank to fulfill one of the most bourgeois of hopes.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this faded little spa town a few miles west of the Polish border, a small part of a European drama is unfolding: A superpower is in retreat. The 20-foot-high likeness of a Soviet soldier that had guarded the town's main square since the late 1940s has been discreetly moved to a military cemetery on the community's western outskirts. Those staffing a Soviet military hospital near the town center left suddenly three weeks ago.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In bloody proof of how critical the Soviet housing shortage can be, two rival ethnic groups in a Central Asian city battled violently for two days over a plot of land to build homes on, leaving at least 11 people dead and more than 200 injured. The flare-up in the city of Osh, in Kirghizia, about 2,400 miles southeast of Moscow, occurred after thousands of Kirghiz and Uzbeks, both Turkic peoples and predominantly Muslim, faced off over a contested farm field.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One and a half million rubles. That astronomical sum--about $840,000 at the inflated commercial exchange rate--is what two out-of-towners agreed to pay for a Moscow residence permit Saturday at an unprecedented auction, the results of which proved eye-popping even for these topsy-turvy times. The million and a half rubles--5,000 times the average Soviet monthly salary--did not buy an apartment, mind you, but merely the right to live in this overpopulated, under-supplied capital of 9 million.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this faded little spa town a few miles west of the Polish border, a small part of a European drama is unfolding: A superpower is in retreat. The 20-foot-high likeness of a Soviet soldier that had guarded the town's main square since the late 1940s has been discreetly moved to a military cemetery on the community's western outskirts. Those staffing a Soviet military hospital near the town center left suddenly three weeks ago.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a legal watchdog committee declared Stalin-era residence restrictions unconstitutional last week, it appeared to move the Soviet Union a giant step closer to observing two basic human rights. With the hated propiska, or residence permit, virtually abolished, Soviet citizens would finally have full rights to live where they want and to choose their place of work. But it is not so simple. Demolishing the old Soviet system can be messy, even dangerous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Soviet Union's rush toward Western-style free markets, this will not go down as a historic deal. But for Santa Monica businessman Conny Klimenko, his recent wheeling and dealing in his native Ukraine discharged a 44-year personal debt of huge proportions. Out of it, Klimenko's father gets a new, hard to come by apartment. The Ukrainian city of Lutsk gets two French swimming pools.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The West German government will pay Moscow more than $7 billion toward the expenses of withdrawing Soviet troops from East Germany, a Foreign Ministry spokesman said Monday. The agreement, announced two days before an international accord on German reunification is to be signed in Moscow, ensures that all four World War II Allies support ending four decades of division.
NEWS
August 27, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They grumble in public as never before and challenge Communist authority in unsoldierly fashion, but to a man, Soviet officers say civilian fears of a military takeover are wildly exaggerated. "It's not even worth talking about such questions because they don't correspond to reality," said Col. Gen. Boris Gromov, the ruddy-faced commander who led Soviet troops out of Afghanistan in February, 1989, his words punctuated by the thunder of firing from a nearby artillery range.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one lives in the pleasant wooden house at 68 Lenin St. The spacious, lace-curtained dwelling that was the boyhood home of V. I. Lenin has been preserved in reverent tribute to his memory. A block away, at 6 Lev Tolstoy St., stands another monument to the Soviet founder. Here, in a nearly identical house, 27 families live packed together like prisoners, a mockery of the workers' paradise that Lenin promised would be the reward of his socialist state.
NEWS
August 27, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They grumble in public as never before and challenge Communist authority in unsoldierly fashion, but to a man, Soviet officers say civilian fears of a military takeover are wildly exaggerated. "It's not even worth talking about such questions because they don't correspond to reality," said Col. Gen. Boris Gromov, the ruddy-faced commander who led Soviet troops out of Afghanistan in February, 1989, his words punctuated by the thunder of firing from a nearby artillery range.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the average Ivan Ivanov from Omsk or Yaroslavl, it is easier to move to Paris these days than to Moscow. In one of the stranger ironies of this topsy-turvy era of reforms, Soviet emigration rules have been eased almost to Western standards, but Stalin era residence restrictions on the country's cities remain in force, creating nightmarish hassles for would-be migrants.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the parquet floors in the spacious rooms intended for the country's elite, the unkempt Timchenko children played with their puppy on a well-worn mattress. Baby carriages and cots with broken metal springs lined the hallway. Toddlers' clothes and towels were hung out to dry on a balcony of what should have been an unoccupied building.
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