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Housing West Germany

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November 14, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months after the East Germans first discovered a hole in the Iron Curtain and began pouring into the West via Hungary and Czechoslovakia, the mayor of this North Sea port declared his city so filled with refugees, it could take no more. That was last week. When East Germany threw open its borders last Friday, Bremen's mayor, Henning Scherf, announced plans to house future refugees in a massive shelter under the city center known locally as "The Bunker" and built for a nuclear catastrophe.
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NEWS
November 14, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months after the East Germans first discovered a hole in the Iron Curtain and began pouring into the West via Hungary and Czechoslovakia, the mayor of this North Sea port declared his city so filled with refugees, it could take no more. That was last week. When East Germany threw open its borders last Friday, Bremen's mayor, Henning Scherf, announced plans to house future refugees in a massive shelter under the city center known locally as "The Bunker" and built for a nuclear catastrophe.
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NEWS
November 10, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The East German government threw open its borders Thursday and announced that its citizens now may travel freely to West Germany. Thousands of jubilant East Germans quickly tested the new policy by flocking to the crossing points in divided Berlin. At Checkpoint Charlie, a major crossing point, a huge crowd gathered. As East Berliners in small groups made their way through the last barrier to West Berlin, the crowds on that side welcomed them with cheers and songs.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The East German government threw open its borders Thursday and announced that its citizens now may travel freely to West Germany. Thousands of jubilant East Germans quickly tested the new policy by flocking to the crossing points in divided Berlin. At Checkpoint Charlie, a major crossing point, a huge crowd gathered. As East Berliners in small groups made their way through the last barrier to West Berlin, the crowds on that side welcomed them with cheers and songs.
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