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NEWS
June 23, 1991 | SCOTT McCARTNEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Greg Cornett left Houston when the work dried up in the '80s and found himself chasing boom-town construction projects, first to Ohio, then to Seattle. A few weeks ago, he got a call from a former supervisor. "He offered me a job and said 'It looks like Houston's coming back,' " Cornett said. "I said 'I'm in.' " Indeed, Houston is back. The city that went from the pinnacle of the '80s boom to the bottom of the oil bust is on top again.
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NEWS
June 23, 1991 | SCOTT McCARTNEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Greg Cornett left Houston when the work dried up in the '80s and found himself chasing boom-town construction projects, first to Ohio, then to Seattle. A few weeks ago, he got a call from a former supervisor. "He offered me a job and said 'It looks like Houston's coming back,' " Cornett said. "I said 'I'm in.' " Indeed, Houston is back. The city that went from the pinnacle of the '80s boom to the bottom of the oil bust is on top again.
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NEWS
November 13, 1987 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Poor old Houston, beaten and battered and left for dead, is showing signs of a pulse. Not a strong one, mind you. But in this city, where the oil bust ruined lives, where 250,000 people lost their jobs, any sign of life is cause for crowing. The economic gurus are proclaiming that the worst of Houston's ills are behind it.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1988 | MICHAEL L. GRACZYK, Associated Press
In a city where bank closings have become so common they fail to attract much notice, officials of Fondren National Bank of Houston did something that was extraordinary but made no headlines. They built a $900,000 bank building and opened it in June. "Obviously if we didn't feel things were moving positively, we wouldn't have done it," said Frank Goldberg, the bank's president. "We think things are better. We know they are."
BUSINESS
July 17, 1988 | MICHAEL L. GRACZYK, Associated Press
In a city where bank closings have become so common they fail to attract much notice, officials of Fondren National Bank of Houston did something that was extraordinary but made no headlines. They built a $900,000 bank building and opened it in June. "Obviously if we didn't feel things were moving positively, we wouldn't have done it," said Frank Goldberg, the bank's president. "We think things are better. We know they are."
BUSINESS
April 13, 1990 | United Press International
Mitsubishi Rayon Co., a leading Japanese chemical company, said it plans to open a facility at the Bayport Industrial Park. Dianal America Inc., a fully owned subsidiary of Mitsubishi Rayon, will specialize in production of acrylic specialty polymers, used in production of toners for copy machines, inks, adhesives and paints.
BOOKS
July 19, 1987 | Taffy Cannon
June Arnold's posthumously published novel "Baby Houston" is wise and wry, a touching evocation of the complexities of family relationships. "Baby," both nicknamed for and handicapped by her slot in a wealthy family's birth order, returns widowed and vulnerable to Houston with two young daughters. She's 39, same age as the century, and at the financial mercy of her patronizing older brother, a "plump kitten" in the burgeoning Houston economy.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
William Dean Singleton, the 36-year-old deal maker suddenly emerging as one of the nation's most aggressive newspaper barons, Thursday announced plans to buy the Houston Post from its Canadian owners for $150 million in cash and a possible future payment if revenue grows. The deal would give Singleton, who already owns the Dallas Times Herald, papers in Texas' two biggest cities, though both are trailing in their markets.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Gains in retail sales and employment continued to propel San Diego growth, surging the city past other metropolitan centers that showed signs of economic slowdown, according to a study released Wednesday. San Diego's gains in retail sales and employment were the highest among 24 cities recorded in a study by the accounting firm Grant Thornton. Along with San Diego, the economies of Houston and Miami showed the most improvement, while Los Angeles and Detroit displayed more moderate strength.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Growth in some big U.S. cities appears to have slowed but the economies of several metropolitan areas across the country are maintaining momentum, according to a study released Wednesday. The accounting firm Grant Thornton said its index of seven economic vital signs for two dozen U.S. metropolitan areas registered a negative reading in this year's first quarter. It was only the second time in 17 quarters that the growth yardstick has pointed downward. The index showed the average growth rate of 24 cities declined in the first quarter by 0.30 point from 1988's final quarter to 108.8.
NEWS
November 13, 1987 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Poor old Houston, beaten and battered and left for dead, is showing signs of a pulse. Not a strong one, mind you. But in this city, where the oil bust ruined lives, where 250,000 people lost their jobs, any sign of life is cause for crowing. The economic gurus are proclaiming that the worst of Houston's ills are behind it.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1986 | From United Press International
Calvin Leung, a Southern California real estate developer and banker, is introducing the Southwest to the Far East on the outskirts of Houston. Leung, who immigrated to the United States from Hong Kong in 1977, is building Tang City, a commercial and residential development that he said will be the nation's largest master-planned Chinatown. The first phase of the $300-million project is scheduled for completion this week.
SPORTS
August 24, 1986 | United Press International
The success of this summer's United States Olympic Festival in Houston has lessened the event's image problems and helped in North Carolina's preparation for hosting it in 1987, local organizers said. "Houston provided a very, very positive experience for the festival," said Hill Carrow, executive director of North Carolina Amateur Sports, the host organization for 1987. "The citizens of Houston were outstanding.
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