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Houston Mctear

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SPORTS
June 22, 1985
As an ardent track and field enthusiast, I found your article on Houston McTear to be a gross waste of valuable news space. McTear's days for headlines are over. I was deeply saddened by his refusal to accept that he no longer possesses the gift of speed as he once did years ago. Now, I, being black, am not trying to dissuade him from his dream to regain his world-class status, but I feel he is living a false dream. A fantasy. He is a perfect example of today's black athletic youth, gifted at one point in life, only to see it ruined by immature decisions, faulty guidance, lack of education and, worst of all, drugs.
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SPORTS
May 6, 1989
Well, it has happened again. There was another story of how an athlete has overcome his drug and alcohol addiction to once again perform up to his "potential." It wasn't too long ago that The Times featured Houston McTear and how well he was doing. But when he was arrested and charged with drug possession, there were only a couple of lines. Now there is this story about Orlando Woolridge. I hope that all of these people really do make it on their roads to recovery, but doesn't the newspaper do them a big disservice and put pressure on them by saying that they have recovered?
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SPORTS
June 12, 1985 | CHRIS BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Glory days, well, they'll pass you by. Glory days, in the wink of a young girl's eye. --BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN (ASCAP), 1984 Sprinter Houston McTear was riding the bus to practice at UCLA from his apartment in West Los Angeles the other day when a man sat down next to him. "Say, didn't you used to be the world's fastest human?" the man asked. The man had a good memory. Many people have long since forgotten about Houston McTear, the one-time schoolboy sprint flash from Florida.
SPORTS
April 19, 1989
Houston McTear, the former world record holder in the 100-yard dash, was arrested Saturday in Santa Monica for sale of an undisclosed amount of marijuana and is being held on $1,000 bail, the Santa Monica police said.
SPORTS
December 8, 1988
Sprinter Houston McTear will begin his comeback in the Sunkist Invitational track meet Jan. 20 at the Sports Arena.
SPORTS
January 17, 1989
Sprinter Houston McTear, who pleaded guilty to one count of selling cocaine, will be sentenced in Santa Monica Superior Court on Jan. 31. McTear was arrested by Santa Monica police for allegedly selling cocaine in a park last fall. Although McTear maintains his innocence, he said he entered a guilty plea to avoid a jail sentence. "They're trying to make an example out of me," McTear said. "I had no other choice. Either I plead guilty and get probation, or go to jail for 3 years."
SPORTS
May 6, 1989
Well, it has happened again. There was another story of how an athlete has overcome his drug and alcohol addiction to once again perform up to his "potential." It wasn't too long ago that The Times featured Houston McTear and how well he was doing. But when he was arrested and charged with drug possession, there were only a couple of lines. Now there is this story about Orlando Woolridge. I hope that all of these people really do make it on their roads to recovery, but doesn't the newspaper do them a big disservice and put pressure on them by saying that they have recovered?
SPORTS
November 26, 1988 | CHRIS BAKER
Russ Francis is in his 13th season in the National Football League. An All-American tight end at Oregon, Francis--6 feet 6 inches and 242 pounds--was selected by the New England Patriots in the first round of the 1975 draft. He made the all-pro team three times in six seasons with the Patriots, but Francis, a free-spirit who marches to the beat of his own Walkman, left pro football at 28 to become a pro wrestler.
SPORTS
November 26, 1988 | CHRIS BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Houston McTear, once the world's fastest human, was down and out in Santa Monica, where he lived in a park overlooking the Pacific Ocean. McTear had hit rock bottom because of his addiction to cocaine. Penniless, McTear slept on the tennis courts at the Pritikin Longevity Center at the beach. He had it better, however, than most of his buddies, who lived in cactus condos at the park--stands of cactus plants littered with empty wine bottles. "I was one of the homeless for 3 years," McTear said.
SPORTS
April 22, 1989
Sprinter Houston McTear failed to appear in Santa Monica Superior Court for sentencing in a cocaine-sales case, prompting Judge James Albracht to issue an arrest warrant. McTear previously had pleaded guilty to the charge and had been free on bail pending sentencing. He had been arrested for allegedly selling cocaine in a Santa Monica park.
SPORTS
January 17, 1989
Sprinter Houston McTear, who pleaded guilty to one count of selling cocaine, will be sentenced in Santa Monica Superior Court on Jan. 31. McTear was arrested by Santa Monica police for allegedly selling cocaine in a park last fall. Although McTear maintains his innocence, he said he entered a guilty plea to avoid a jail sentence. "They're trying to make an example out of me," McTear said. "I had no other choice. Either I plead guilty and get probation, or go to jail for 3 years."
SPORTS
November 26, 1988 | CHRIS BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Houston McTear, once the world's fastest human, was down and out in Santa Monica, where he lived in a park overlooking the Pacific Ocean. McTear had hit rock bottom because of his addiction to cocaine. Penniless, McTear slept on the tennis courts at the Pritikin Longevity Center at the beach. He had it better, however, than most of his buddies, who lived in cactus condos at the park--stands of cactus plants littered with empty wine bottles. "I was one of the homeless for 3 years," McTear said.
SPORTS
November 26, 1988 | CHRIS BAKER
Russ Francis is in his 13th season in the National Football League. An All-American tight end at Oregon, Francis--6 feet 6 inches and 242 pounds--was selected by the New England Patriots in the first round of the 1975 draft. He made the all-pro team three times in six seasons with the Patriots, but Francis, a free-spirit who marches to the beat of his own Walkman, left pro football at 28 to become a pro wrestler.
SPORTS
June 22, 1985
As an ardent track and field enthusiast, I found your article on Houston McTear to be a gross waste of valuable news space. McTear's days for headlines are over. I was deeply saddened by his refusal to accept that he no longer possesses the gift of speed as he once did years ago. Now, I, being black, am not trying to dissuade him from his dream to regain his world-class status, but I feel he is living a false dream. A fantasy. He is a perfect example of today's black athletic youth, gifted at one point in life, only to see it ruined by immature decisions, faulty guidance, lack of education and, worst of all, drugs.
SPORTS
June 12, 1985 | CHRIS BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Glory days, well, they'll pass you by. Glory days, in the wink of a young girl's eye. --BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN (ASCAP), 1984 Sprinter Houston McTear was riding the bus to practice at UCLA from his apartment in West Los Angeles the other day when a man sat down next to him. "Say, didn't you used to be the world's fastest human?" the man asked. The man had a good memory. Many people have long since forgotten about Houston McTear, the one-time schoolboy sprint flash from Florida.
SPORTS
August 14, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Athletes from the United States and Kenya dominated the Stockholm Games, winning four events each. Houston McTear, a former world indoor record-holder at 60 meters now living in Sweden, led the United States to a 1-2-3 finish in the 100 meters in 10.56 seconds. Other U.S. winners were Kory Tarpenning in the pole vault at 18-2; Marcha Guildo in the women's 100 hurdles at 13.31, and Diana Wills in the women's triple jump at 43-5 3/4.
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