Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHoward Armstrong
IN THE NEWS

Howard Armstrong

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
Howard Armstrong may be the music world's leading 79-year-old rapscallion. Armstrong, who makes a rare Los Angeles appearance in his performing guise of Louie Bluie at the Music Machine tonight, was largely unknown even to connoisseurs of pre-World War II black music until five years ago. But the 1985 documentary film "Louie Bluie" and its sound-track album provided a sparkling introduction to the music and indomitable spirit of the mandolin player, fiddler, painter and raconteur.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
Howard Armstrong may be the music world's leading 79-year-old rapscallion. Armstrong, who makes a rare Los Angeles appearance in his performing guise of Louie Bluie at the Music Machine tonight, was largely unknown even to connoisseurs of pre-World War II black music until five years ago. But the 1985 documentary film "Louie Bluie" and its sound-track album provided a sparkling introduction to the music and indomitable spirit of the mandolin player, fiddler, painter and raconteur.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2003 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dana Raymond, 89, a patent lawyer who represented the electrical engineer who invented FM radio, died Aug. 3 in New York City. Raymond represented Edwin Howard Armstrong, the inventor of wideband frequency modulation, or FM radio, in lawsuits against companies that had denied him credit and compensation for his invention. Armstrong, whose claim to inventing the technology was challenged in court by RCA and NBC, committed suicide in 1954.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2000
What's happening the next few weeks: * Ravi Shankar, right, plays Sept. 17 at 7:30 p.m. at Boston's Symphony Hall, 301 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. (617) 266-1200. * The Boston Blues Festival, Sept. 23 and 24 at the Charles River Esplanade, will feature Eddy "The Chief" Clearwater and Weepin' Willie & the All Star Blues Band. The festival includes a concert Sept. 20 at 8 p.m. by Howard Armstrong and Guy Davis at Johnny D's, 17 Holland St., Sommerville, and concludes Sept. 27 at 7:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1987
The Ken Cinema's Monday night jazz film festival continues Dec. 14 with a double feature of George T. Nierenberg's "No Maps on My Taps" and "In a Jazz Way: Portrait of Mura Dehn." "No Maps on My Taps" explores the tap artistry of black dancers such as Bill (Bojangles) Robinson, Sandman Simms, Bunny Briggs, Chuck Green and John Bubbles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1986 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Howard Armstrong is such a marvelous creation that it's hard to believe he's a mere mortal. Full of impish braggadocio--even at 76 he walks with a strut--he's like a colorful character culled from a raunchy Willie Dixon blues song. "Louie Bluie" (at the Nuart through Friday) captures this venerable black string musician in all his ribald splendor. Born in rural Tennessee, Armstrong is a startling cultural treasure chest.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995 | Judy Brennan, Judy Brennan is a regular contributor to Calendar
The lens is about to zoom in on Woody Allen's life. But this documentary undoubtedly will have nothing to do with angst or his sordid love life and everything to do with one of his greatest loves: music. Directed by documentary filmmaker Terry Zwigoff--whose last effort was the critically acclaimed biography of cartoonist Robert Crumb--the movie will follow Woody, his clarinet and his six-member New Orleans Funeral and Ragtime Orchestra as they "do Europe" at the end of February.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN and DR
In this feature, The Times' pop-music writers spotlight out-of-the-way albums of special merit. Album: "Louie Bluie" (Arhoolie). History: Anyone who caught that irrepressible rapscallion Howard Armstrong in the delightful documentary film "Louie Bluie" last year will cherish this sound-track album. There are only snatches of the 75-year-old's earthy repartee, but the record offers an invaluable glimpse into the often overlooked black string-band tradition.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ken Burns, the Emmy-winning filmmaker of "The Civil War," turns his eye on a little-known chapter in American history in "Empire of the Air: The Men Who Made Radio." Based on Tom Lewis' book, "Empire of the Air" examines the dark, tragic backstage drama in the lives of three remarkable men who were radio pioneers--David Sarnoff, Lee de Forest and Edwin Howard Armstrong. De Forest, who called himself the "Father of Radio," invented the radio tube but didn't know how it worked.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Most Americans are probably too young to recall that television began as the tip of radio's iceberg. Or that, once upon a time, our imaginations were not shaped by pictures coming from a small screen but were expanded through the limitless panorama of sound. Writer Norman Corwin says it well tonight in a new PBS documentary from Ken Burns: "Sound itself attracts--ask any eavesdropper. Sound is the first stirring of the infant. He hears sounds, he puts them together, they cohere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2003 | From Associated Press
Howard "Louie Bluie" Armstrong, a string-band fiddler who mastered genres from bluegrass to jazz, has died. He was 94. Armstrong died Wednesday in Boston from complications related to a heart attack in March. A composer, instrumentalist and singer, Armstrong performed across the country. Two PBS documentary films, Terry Zwigoff's "Louie Bluie" in 1985 and Leah Mahan's "Sweet Old Song" in 2002, chronicled parts of his life and work.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|