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Howard Dean

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NATIONAL
December 30, 2003 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean announced a raft of initiatives Monday to boost the quality of life in cities, seeking to burnish his credentials on housing, public safety and other urban issues. During a 30-minute speech to several hundred people at a downtown hotel here, Dean pledged to give tax credits to new companies that invest in low-income communities, and to create a national housing trust fund to increase the stock of affordable housing. He also said he would seek to raise the federal minimum wage to $7 an hour from $5.15.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By David Ng
Phillip Hayes Dean, the theater actor, director and playwright whose stage biography of Paul Robeson is currently being performed in Los Angeles, has died at age 83. Dean died Monday in L.A. of an aortic aneurysm, according to a spokeswoman for the play. Dean wrote "Paul Robeson," and the drama opened in 1978 on Broadway in a production starring James Earl Jones. The playwright recently directed the drama in a production starring Keith David that is running at the Nate Holden Performing Arts Center in L.A. through April 27. The play, which features just one actor and a musician, follows the life of the pioneering black stage and screen actor.
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NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By Seema Mehta, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Former Democratic Party leader Howard Dean and the progressive group he founded endorsed Rep. Michael M. Honda's reelection bid Tuesday, their first foray into a 2014 congressional contest. Honda is a seven-term incumbent who represents the Silicon Valley but is facing a well-funded challenge from fellow Democrat Ro Khanna, a former member of President Obama's administration. In an email to supporters, Dean wrote that he and his organization, Democracy for America, were endorsing Honda because of Honda's track record on issues such as gay rights, abortion and Social Security.
NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By Seema Mehta, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Former Democratic Party leader Howard Dean and the progressive group he founded endorsed Rep. Michael M. Honda's reelection bid Tuesday, their first foray into a 2014 congressional contest. Honda is a seven-term incumbent who represents the Silicon Valley but is facing a well-funded challenge from fellow Democrat Ro Khanna, a former member of President Obama's administration. In an email to supporters, Dean wrote that he and his organization, Democracy for America, were endorsing Honda because of Honda's track record on issues such as gay rights, abortion and Social Security.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
SAN JOSE -- Former Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean said Wednesday that President Obama needs to justify his administration's surveillance policies to the American people. “I think the American people are willing to give up some privacy in exchange for safety, but I think the president has to essentially ask our permission,” he said in an interview at a gathering here of liberal bloggers and activists. “The reason this country works is because we are governed with the consent of the governed.
OPINION
August 8, 2003
Re "Democrats in All-Union Dress," Aug. 6: The AFL-CIO's family forum focused on domestic issues and the nine Democratic hopefuls, highlighting the subtle differences between the candidates. Why, then, did the article bring up that certain Democrats think that the party is being moved too far left by liberals such as Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich (D-Ohio) and former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean? Dean is not a liberal by most accounts. He does value equal civil rights but he is also a supporter of states' rights and is a fiscal conservative desiring balanced budgets and decreased spending.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2003 | From Associated Press
Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean said Friday that his 17-year-old son and four other teenagers were cited for attempting to steal liquor from a Vermont country club. Dean, who canceled several campaign appearances, said his son, Paul, and teammates on a high school hockey team apparently were discovered Friday morning at Burlington Country Club by a police officer on routine patrol. Dean said it was his understanding that his son would be charged as an accessory to burglary.
OPINION
December 22, 2003
Re "Dean's Conflicting Iraq Comments Draw Scrutiny," Dec. 18: Conflicting comments? By whose standards, Sen. John Kerry's? Give me a break. After reading the list of Howard Dean's statements on the Iraq war it is plain to me that they are not at all conflicting. Too many times the headlines in your newspaper betray what is actually being reported. To call Dean's comments "conflicting" is irresponsible editorializing and only furthers the misrepresentation of a candidate who actually says what he thinks, not what he thinks will get him elected.
OPINION
July 4, 2003
Re "Dean's Momentum Stirs Opponents' Fears," July 1: The reason for the rise of former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean in the Democratic field of presidential contenders is simple. The performance of the Democratic leadership since President Bush took office is pathetic. Bush has rammed through a foolish domestic agenda and dangerous foreign policies with no opposition. Dean may not be perfect but he is not afraid to fight back. The once-proud party of FDR, Harry Truman and Bill Clinton is currently run by cowards.
OPINION
May 5, 2003 | Joe Edelheit Ross, Joe Edelheit Ross was a campaign aide to former Sen. Paul Tsongas during the 1992 presidential primaries.
After Paul Tsongas won the 1992 New Hampshire primary, we on his staff thought for a surreal moment lasting several days that maybe, just maybe, he might win the nomination. After all, back in 1976 an obscure former governor bounced overnight from 5% in the polls to national prominence when he won the first-in-the-nation primary, which, along with a surprise caucus victory in Iowa, helped turn "Jimmy Who?" into the eventual Democratic nominee.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Republicans have said hyperbolic things about the 2010 healthcare law's Independent Payment Advisory Board so many times -- e.g., former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin's declaration that it's a " death panel " -- that I've gotten inured to it. Nevertheless, it was a little startling to see some of the same facts-be-damned assertions coming from a liberal Democrat on the op-ed page of the Wall Street Journal. Former Democratic Party Chairman Howard Dean took to the Journal on Monday to attack the IPAB with the same blatant mischaracterizations that have been the hallmarks of the GOP attacks.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2013 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
SAN JOSE - The thousands of liberal activists and bloggers who gathered here in recent days were President Obama's base - they helped propel him to victory in 2008 and ensure that he was reelected in 2012. But for many, the luster has worn off the president, with the phone and email surveillance scandal - and Obama's defense of it - the latest in a lengthy list of disappointments. "When he proposes cutting Social Security benefits, does nothing on jobs, does nothing on holding Wall Street accountable and now is spying on every American, that's not something he can ask people who wanted hope and change to rally around," said Adam Green, co-founder of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
SAN JOSE -- Former Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean said Wednesday that President Obama needs to justify his administration's surveillance policies to the American people. “I think the American people are willing to give up some privacy in exchange for safety, but I think the president has to essentially ask our permission,” he said in an interview at a gathering here of liberal bloggers and activists. “The reason this country works is because we are governed with the consent of the governed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2013 | By Meredith Blake, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - As an undergraduate art major at Columbia University, Beau Willimon, the Oscar-nominated screenwriter of "The Ides of March" and creator of the much-hyped new Netflix series "House of Cards," never would have guessed he'd build a career writing about politics. "I was one of those guys that had paint all splattered over my jeans," says the 35-year-old between hearty gulps of coffee at the Smile, a fashionably rustic restaurant in NoHo. FOR THE RECORD: "House of Cards": In the Feb. 12 Calendar section, an article about "House of Cards" creator Beau Willimon misspelled the first name of Kevin Spacey's character in the Netflix series, Francis Underwood, as Frances.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2010
SATURDAY Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC McLaughlin Group 6:30 p.m. KCET SUNDAY Today Chelsea Clinton's wedding; Bill Clegg. (N) 6 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America (N) 6 a.m. KABC State of the Union Race in America: Christopher Edley, UC Berkeley Law School; John McWhorter. President Obama and the business community: Mort Zuckerman; Steve Forbes. 6 and 9 a.m. CNN CBS News Sunday Morning Wayne Newton. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Fareed Zakaria GPS Afghanistan and Pakistan: U.S. special representative Richard C. Holbrooke.
NATIONAL
January 2, 2010 | By James Oliphant
If there is one thing in the proposed congressional healthcare overhaul that sets Michael Cannon's libertarian teeth on edge, it's the requirement that all Americans get health insurance. "The federal government does not have the power to force you to purchase a private product," said Cannon, a health policy analyst at the Cato Institute, a free-market think tank in Washington. But with Congress poised to do just that, the mandate for near-universal coverage is generating opposition not only from libertarians like Cannon, who object to the guiding hand of government regulation in almost any form, but from some liberals -- and even from some members of the insurance industry, which stands to gain millions of customers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2003
Needing a lift from an influential Democrat, Gov. Gray Davis got one Saturday from the party's front-running presidential candidate, Howard Dean, who in a joint appearance urged defeat of the recall effort and accused President Bush and his top political aide of "having their hand" in the movement. Dean, the former Vermont governor, said the recall campaign fits a national pattern of Republican attempts to overturn elections they could not win on their own.
OPINION
December 23, 2003
In his Dec. 21 editorial cartoon ("The Straight Shooter," Commentary), Michael Ramirez accuses Howard Dean of misrepresentation and lying. Last week Dean stated that the capture of Saddam Hussein did not make America any safer, and all the right-wing pundits attacked him. Now the Bush administration has raised the official terror threat level to orange, the highest danger level since 9/11. So, assuming the administration is telling the truth (a large assumption, considering the administration's habit of lying and trying to rule through fear)
NATIONAL
December 18, 2009 | By James Oliphant
The White House and several advocacy groups banded together Thursday in an attempt to pacify liberals who are furious over compromises made to the Senate healthcare legislation. The bill's advocates said that it still would make a difference in the lives of Americans, and warned that the cost of failure was high. Former President Clinton issued a statement that said: "America can't afford to let the perfect be the enemy of the good. And this is a good bill." And abandoning the effort to pass healthcare legislation would be "a tragic outcome," David Axelrod, a senior advisor to President Obama, told MSNBC.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2008 | Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writer
It's Tuesday in the nation's capital and the doctor is in. Seated in his corner office at Democratic Party headquarters, Howard Dean is discussing the ways of Washington, a place he likens to middle school on steroids. "There's an enormous amount of attention paid to who went to what dinner and who sat next to who and who was in the paper and who wasn't," Dean says, arching an eyebrow. "It's not a world I'm accustomed to."
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