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Howard Koch

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NEWS
August 18, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Screenwriter Howard Koch, who penned the landmark 1938 radio program "War of the Worlds" and shared an Academy Award in 1942 for co-writing the Humphrey Bogart classic "Casablanca" only to have his career interrupted in the 1950s when he was blacklisted, died Thursday. He was 92. Koch died at a Kingston, N.Y., hospital after a bout with pneumonia, family members said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Hawk Koch remembers sitting with his family at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in 1989 and watching as his father, Hollywood producer Howard W. Koch, received the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences' Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award at the Oscars. The elder Koch had served as academy president in the 1970s and had worked on films as diverse as"The Manchurian Candidate"and "Airplane. " He addressed his son - who by then had produced "Gorky Park" and had served as first assistant director on"Chinatown" - from the dais.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2000 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's cut to the chase. His name is Hawk. For most of his life, he was known in Hollywood as Howard W. Koch Jr., working his way up the career ladder on such notable films as "The Way We Were," "Rosemary's Baby," "Chinatown," "Barefoot in the Park" and "Heaven Can Wait," then co-producing films like "Gorky Park," "The Pope of Greenwich Village" and "The Keep." But as the son and namesake of veteran filmmaker and onetime Paramount Pictures studio chief Howard W.
SPORTS
July 20, 2005 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
Thirty years ago, when Bill Koch was 5, he trailed his grandfather to tracks all over California to see a 2-year-old gelding called Telly's Pop run. Young Koch was here in 1975 when Telly's Pop, owned by actor Telly Savalas and movie producer Howard W. Koch, won the Del Mar Futurity. "Has it been that long?" Bill Koch said. "Well, I'm 35, so I guess it has been."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1995
"The report of my death has been greatly exaggerated"--Mark Twain. I recently had an experience that was devastating to my family and myself due to the fact that the Associated Press and various television channels printed my picture in reporting the death of Howard Koch, who was one of the three writers of the famous film "Casablanca." Now I know how Twain felt in 1897 when he wrote the above quote to the Associated Press. My name is Howard W. Koch, and no relation to Howard Koch, the writer who died last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Auction notes: The original "War of the Worlds" radio script, written and sold by Howard Koch, fetched $143,000 at auction at Sotheby's auction house in New York on Wednesday. The 46-page script had sat in writer Howard Koch's file cabinet for years after the 1938 Orson Welles production panicked listeners who believed the Earth was being invaded by Martians. "I had a private offer of $60,000 (but) I was advised to take the gamble. I guess it was the right gamble," Koch said. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1991
In "You Must Remember This" (May 14), Murray Burnett, co-author with Joan Alison of the play "Everybody Comes to Rick's," complains that he did not receive sufficient credit for its contribution to the film "Casablanca," and he may be right. When Warners assigned me to the story, I had not read the play. We were facing a deadline, the camera was on our heels, so the material I was working on was limited to what I inherited from Julius and Philip Epstein, which I assumed contained what was useful from the original play.
SPORTS
July 20, 2005 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
Thirty years ago, when Bill Koch was 5, he trailed his grandfather to tracks all over California to see a 2-year-old gelding called Telly's Pop run. Young Koch was here in 1975 when Telly's Pop, owned by actor Telly Savalas and movie producer Howard W. Koch, won the Del Mar Futurity. "Has it been that long?" Bill Koch said. "Well, I'm 35, so I guess it has been."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
So far as I know, Mark Twain was the first American author to be captured by the motion picture camera. There is brief footage of him, in the familiar white suit on the veranda of his house in Connecticut. In a new day, hardly anyone will escape not just the camera but the sound camera, recording our unscripted inanities on Christmas morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
As time and 50 years go by, that now classic movie "Casablanca" keeps coming back, twice reduced to home video, colorized, dubbed and redubbed, transmogrified by ABC and CBS into two unsuccessful television series and now heading back to big-screen theaters (April 10 at Mann's Chinese and April 17 at the Ken in San Diego), scrubbed and cleaned up again by the cinematic recyclers of Turner Entertainment. Somehow they keep finding ways to play it again . . . and again . . . and again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2001 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veteran producer-director Howard W. Koch, onetime president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences and former head of production at Paramount Pictures, died Friday of complications from Alzheimer's disease. He was 84. As a producer, he counted the classic 1962 film "The Manchurian Candidate" among his credits.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2000 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's cut to the chase. His name is Hawk. For most of his life, he was known in Hollywood as Howard W. Koch Jr., working his way up the career ladder on such notable films as "The Way We Were," "Rosemary's Baby," "Chinatown," "Barefoot in the Park" and "Heaven Can Wait," then co-producing films like "Gorky Park," "The Pope of Greenwich Village" and "The Keep." But as the son and namesake of veteran filmmaker and onetime Paramount Pictures studio chief Howard W.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1995
"The report of my death has been greatly exaggerated"--Mark Twain. I recently had an experience that was devastating to my family and myself due to the fact that the Associated Press and various television channels printed my picture in reporting the death of Howard Koch, who was one of the three writers of the famous film "Casablanca." Now I know how Twain felt in 1897 when he wrote the above quote to the Associated Press. My name is Howard W. Koch, and no relation to Howard Koch, the writer who died last week.
NEWS
August 18, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Screenwriter Howard Koch, who penned the landmark 1938 radio program "War of the Worlds" and shared an Academy Award in 1942 for co-writing the Humphrey Bogart classic "Casablanca" only to have his career interrupted in the 1950s when he was blacklisted, died Thursday. He was 92. Koch died at a Kingston, N.Y., hospital after a bout with pneumonia, family members said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
As time and 50 years go by, that now classic movie "Casablanca" keeps coming back, twice reduced to home video, colorized, dubbed and redubbed, transmogrified by ABC and CBS into two unsuccessful television series and now heading back to big-screen theaters (April 10 at Mann's Chinese and April 17 at the Ken in San Diego), scrubbed and cleaned up again by the cinematic recyclers of Turner Entertainment. Somehow they keep finding ways to play it again . . . and again . . . and again.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1991
In "You Must Remember This" (May 14), Murray Burnett, co-author with Joan Alison of the play "Everybody Comes to Rick's," complains that he did not receive sufficient credit for its contribution to the film "Casablanca," and he may be right. When Warners assigned me to the story, I had not read the play. We were facing a deadline, the camera was on our heels, so the material I was working on was limited to what I inherited from Julius and Philip Epstein, which I assumed contained what was useful from the original play.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2001 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veteran producer-director Howard W. Koch, onetime president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences and former head of production at Paramount Pictures, died Friday of complications from Alzheimer's disease. He was 84. As a producer, he counted the classic 1962 film "The Manchurian Candidate" among his credits.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Hawk Koch remembers sitting with his family at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in 1989 and watching as his father, Hollywood producer Howard W. Koch, received the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences' Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award at the Oscars. The elder Koch had served as academy president in the 1970s and had worked on films as diverse as"The Manchurian Candidate"and "Airplane. " He addressed his son - who by then had produced "Gorky Park" and had served as first assistant director on"Chinatown" - from the dais.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
So far as I know, Mark Twain was the first American author to be captured by the motion picture camera. There is brief footage of him, in the familiar white suit on the veranda of his house in Connecticut. In a new day, hardly anyone will escape not just the camera but the sound camera, recording our unscripted inanities on Christmas morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Auction notes: The original "War of the Worlds" radio script, written and sold by Howard Koch, fetched $143,000 at auction at Sotheby's auction house in New York on Wednesday. The 46-page script had sat in writer Howard Koch's file cabinet for years after the 1938 Orson Welles production panicked listeners who believed the Earth was being invaded by Martians. "I had a private offer of $60,000 (but) I was advised to take the gamble. I guess it was the right gamble," Koch said. . . .
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