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Howard Rosenberg

ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2002 | Howard Rosenberg
Mr. Egg Nog faced the camera and threw America a smile, sharing the small screen with a woman playing "White Christmas" on a grand piano. It was warm, it was cozy, it was intimate. "What a first show we have," said the host of "After Hours with Cal Thomas" on the Fox News Channel, "with guests Michael Feinstein and Mr. Vice President, Dick Cheney!" Cal who? Host of what? On what? Yes, that's right. Showing their sense of humor, and getting in touch with their inner Hyohhhhhh!
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2002
HOWARD Rosenberg's biting wit is right on target when he insightfully describes the way in which a beautiful, defenseless kudu is killed in cold blood by what can only be described as a delusional "sportsman" operating under the assumption that he is somehow doing something masterful in his testosterone-drenched world ("Gatherers of beautiful, deceased animals," Nov. 22). Unfortunately, this bizarre, destructive behavior is repeated tens of thousands of times each year. The clarity of Rosenberg's eye really lets us see how devoid of sensibility these vacuous people really are. Jackie Raven New York IN less than a week, 18 people have been violently killed on the streets of Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2002 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comedy pilots don't get any funnier than Sunday's "Bram and Alice" on CBS. Nor do sitcom actors come more accomplished than its Tony-nominated male star, Alfred Molina, whose versatility runs from Shakespeare to broad TV comedy. One of those rare Brits working on American TV as a Brit, Molina has had his prime-time clunkers, most notably as a badly miscast Hercule Poirot in a CBS remake of "Murder on the Orient Express."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2002
Judging by his acerbic review of "Last Call" ("Flash Outshines Any Substance," May 25), Howard Rosenberg must have seen a film different from the one that appeared on Showtime May 25. He dismisses the performance of Jeremy Irons as bogus, British and too tall, and Neve Campbell as a wide-eyed Judy Garland singing "You Made Me Love You." He ignores Irons' ability to reach inside a character and find the torment that plagued Fitzgerald when I worked for him. I saw the actor become the author.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2002
Another year of "24" ("Here's the 411 for Confused '24' Fans," by Howard Rosenberg, May 27)? Not me, baby. Not again. I didn't miss an episode this season, but to watch another full year of silly twists and 180-degree turns just wouldn't be, well ... logical. LARRY TRAVIS Glendale
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2002
The cynical and sarcastic ridicule of Howard Rosenberg toward those who proclaim "God Bless America" and display the flag is disgusting and disgraceful ("Broadcast in Red, White and Blue," Feb. 8). Why doesn't he stick to his job of reviewing TV programs instead of forcing on us his distorted personal views? HOWARD LOCKWOOD Lake View Terrace Originally, I was annoyed that NBC was going to tape-delay the Olympics for the West Coast. Now, I'm simply bemused by the disclaimer supered over the intro to the coverage: "Recorded LIVE from a previous broadcast."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2001
On Page 33: KIIS-FM's massive Jingle Ball concert at Staples Center was a survey in contrasting styles and abilities that ended as a showcase for fast-rising Colombian singer Shakira, left. Also, Howard Rosenberg questions a "60 Minutes" spy story.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2001
Howard Rosenberg ridicules the struggle to keep Elian Gonzalez in the U.S.A. ("Old Obsessions Dwarfed by Real News," Oct. 26). He says that it was done to keep Elian "saluting the flag on U.S. soil," thus implying that the child was going to be brainwashed if allowed to stay. He then calls those who "insisted" that Elian would be--as he sarcastically puts it--turned into a "godless android" if returned to Cuba as mere "hysterical Chicken Littles." What Rosenberg doesn't tell his readers is that as a Young Pioneer, Elian must strive to be "like El Che," the iconic terrorist of the 1960s; he must hold allegiance to the motherland; he must learn to assemble a machine gun; and he will be forced to harvest crops for the state--it's called volunteering--from the age of 12 on for one month a year if he is to be allowed to study in Cuba's "free schools."
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