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Howard Shore

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2001 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The musical career of Howard Shore keeps taking strange turns. Back in the late '60s, he played saxophone with a Canadian rock band. He went on to become the original musical director for TV's "Saturday Night Live" and followed that by becoming a film composer, doing nearly all of David Cronenberg's films and such thrillers as "The Silence of the Lambs" and "Seven." In terms of scope and impact, however, his latest gig eclipses them all.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
Two years ago, a bass-baritone covered in gook stalked the stage of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. That was the medieval monster in Elliot Goldenthal's "Grendel," commissioned by Los Angeles Opera. Sunday afternoon, a baritone covered in gook again stalked the Chandler stage. This time it was Brundle, the scientist hero transmogrified into a Musca domestica in Howard Shore's "The Fly," inspired by the 1986 David Cronenberg horror film -- the latest opera commissioned by the company.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2006 | Diane Haithman
IT'S not the first time opera has served as the backdrop for the operatic violence in a cinematic tale of organized crime. But it's probably safe to say that Martin Scorsese's "The Departed" is the first mob film to use opera as cellphone ring tone -- for Jack Nicholson's crime leader, Frank Costello. Howard Shore, composer of the movie's original score, says that weaving the well-known Act 2 sextet "Chi mi frena" from Donizetti's "Lucia di Lammermoor" into the film was Scorsese's idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2006 | Diane Haithman
IT'S not the first time opera has served as the backdrop for the operatic violence in a cinematic tale of organized crime. But it's probably safe to say that Martin Scorsese's "The Departed" is the first mob film to use opera as cellphone ring tone -- for Jack Nicholson's crime leader, Frank Costello. Howard Shore, composer of the movie's original score, says that weaving the well-known Act 2 sextet "Chi mi frena" from Donizetti's "Lucia di Lammermoor" into the film was Scorsese's idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2004
'The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King' Howard Shore All this year's contenders had either won or been nominated previously. Howard Shore, the winner for his work on "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King," composed, orchestrated and conducted every note in the three "Lord of the Rings" pictures, writing about 10 hours of music for the project.
NEWS
October 20, 2005
Spike goes Jedi: Spike TV has picked up all six "Star Wars" movies, paying a fee of between $65 million and $70 million for the franchise, Daily Variety reported Wednesday. Other networks have aired the first three movies, but Spike, which out-muscled USA Network, TBS and others in the deal, hopes to score big Nielsen numbers through promotions and marathons.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2004 | Mark Swed
That operatic opening flourish in Howard Shore's score to "The Fly" evokes Puccini's "Turandot." But operatic allusions pretty much end there in David Cronenberg's 1986 horror film, in which Jeff Goldblum turns into an oozing insect as Geena Davis watches in disgust. Now, though, it turns out that this monster might well stalk the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Los Angeles Opera general director Placido Domingo has invited Shore and playwright David Henry Hwang to make an opera based on the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Composer James Newton Howard received the Henry Mancini Award for Lifetime Achievement at the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers' 15th annual awards gala. An 18-time winner of ASCAP film and television awards since 1992, Howard, 48, known for his ability to include a range of diverse styles in his scores, composed the music for such films as "The Fugitive," "The Prince of Tides," "Pretty Woman" and "The Sixth Sense."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
Two years ago, a bass-baritone covered in gook stalked the stage of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. That was the medieval monster in Elliot Goldenthal's "Grendel," commissioned by Los Angeles Opera. Sunday afternoon, a baritone covered in gook again stalked the Chandler stage. This time it was Brundle, the scientist hero transmogrified into a Musca domestica in Howard Shore's "The Fly," inspired by the 1986 David Cronenberg horror film -- the latest opera commissioned by the company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2001
A former San Diego police officer accused of stalking a supervisor and breaking into her home has been found incompetent to stand trial. Karen Mitchell, 41, was sent to Patton State Hospital and will remain there until doctors say she can understand the charges against her. San Diego Superior Court Judge Howard Shore, citing sealed psychiatric evaluations of Mitchell, made the ruling Wednesday.
NEWS
October 20, 2005
Spike goes Jedi: Spike TV has picked up all six "Star Wars" movies, paying a fee of between $65 million and $70 million for the franchise, Daily Variety reported Wednesday. Other networks have aired the first three movies, but Spike, which out-muscled USA Network, TBS and others in the deal, hopes to score big Nielsen numbers through promotions and marathons.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2004 | Mark Swed
That operatic opening flourish in Howard Shore's score to "The Fly" evokes Puccini's "Turandot." But operatic allusions pretty much end there in David Cronenberg's 1986 horror film, in which Jeff Goldblum turns into an oozing insect as Geena Davis watches in disgust. Now, though, it turns out that this monster might well stalk the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Los Angeles Opera general director Placido Domingo has invited Shore and playwright David Henry Hwang to make an opera based on the film.
NEWS
March 1, 2004
'Into the West' Howard Shore, Fran Walsh and Annie Lennox Although all the contenders in this category were first-timers, Shore took the stage still clutching the Oscar he had won moments before for best score for the same movie, "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King." "Cold Mountain" had received nominations for both of its original songs, "You Will Be My Ain True Love" and "Scarlet Tide."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2001 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The musical career of Howard Shore keeps taking strange turns. Back in the late '60s, he played saxophone with a Canadian rock band. He went on to become the original musical director for TV's "Saturday Night Live" and followed that by becoming a film composer, doing nearly all of David Cronenberg's films and such thrillers as "The Silence of the Lambs" and "Seven." In terms of scope and impact, however, his latest gig eclipses them all.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Composer James Newton Howard received the Henry Mancini Award for Lifetime Achievement at the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers' 15th annual awards gala. An 18-time winner of ASCAP film and television awards since 1992, Howard, 48, known for his ability to include a range of diverse styles in his scores, composed the music for such films as "The Fugitive," "The Prince of Tides," "Pretty Woman" and "The Sixth Sense."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1991
A 60-year-old woman charged with murdering her husband, a retired San Diego State University professor, pleaded not guilty Thursday, and her bail was set at $500,000. Lisa Marie Herrmann of San Diego is charged in the fatal shooting of her husband, Hubert Herrmann, 61, who was found in the bathroom of the couple's home in Paradise Hills on Tuesday. Lisa Herrmann appeared before San Diego Municipal Judge Howard Shore. Deputy Dist. tty.
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