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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2011
Howard Tate, 72, a soul singer who got a second chance at a career three decades after being derailed by disputes with industry executives, personal tragedy and drug addiction, died Dec. 2 in Burlington, N.J., said a spokesman for the Burlington County medical examiner. Born in Macon, Ga., and reared in Philadelphia, Tate had three top 20 rhythm-and-blues hits in the late 1960s and early '70s, including "Get It While You Can," written by his longtime producer Jerry Ragovoy (who died in July)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2011
Howard Tate, 72, a soul singer who got a second chance at a career three decades after being derailed by disputes with industry executives, personal tragedy and drug addiction, died Dec. 2 in Burlington, N.J., said a spokesman for the Burlington County medical examiner. Born in Macon, Ga., and reared in Philadelphia, Tate had three top 20 rhythm-and-blues hits in the late 1960s and early '70s, including "Get It While You Can," written by his longtime producer Jerry Ragovoy (who died in July)
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2004 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
If this story were set to music, even Howard Tate might go back and tone it down a notch. Maybe he'd swap out a few details, make it feel less melodramatic, shore it up with a little hope. But the R&B singer, who vanished from the music scene for nearly 30 years after the quick flush of success, knows he can't go back and tweak the more painful memories of his own journey. He certainly wonders how he survived it: Punishing work schedules. Bad or nonexistent contracts. Tossing away his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2004 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
If this story were set to music, even Howard Tate might go back and tone it down a notch. Maybe he'd swap out a few details, make it feel less melodramatic, shore it up with a little hope. But the R&B singer, who vanished from the music scene for nearly 30 years after the quick flush of success, knows he can't go back and tweak the more painful memories of his own journey. He certainly wonders how he survived it: Punishing work schedules. Bad or nonexistent contracts. Tossing away his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2007 | Ann Powers, Times Staff Writer
Most musical legends have a horde of imitators nipping at their legacies, but there will never be a new Leonard Cohen. Sure, a young pretender could copy Cohen's ground-glass growl, or whip out a Bible and some volumes of European poetry and nail his reference points, but the fullness of meaning that Cohen's songs achieve is nearly impossible to emulate.
BOOKS
October 25, 1987 | Gary Dretzka
HEADLINES by Graham Masterton (St. Martin's Press: $18.95; 468 pp.). Romeo and Juliet, Chicago style: "The Polish dance music wafted in through the window. The night was warm. Some things are beyond the grasp of ordinary men, and that evening Harry knew that Morgana Croft Tate was one of them." It's 1949. Morgana Croft Tate is the daughter of newspaper tycoon Howard Croft Tate, liberal counterpart to the Chicago Tribune's Col.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2004 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
It might be lonely at the top, as Randy Newman wrote in one of his funniest pieces of cliche-skewering, but it was certainly crowded on the stage of UCLA's Royce Hall on Saturday, where the esteemed singer-songwriter's body of work was treated to a fascinating exploration by a formidable gathering of admirers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2007 | David Bauder, Associated Press
Many of singer Nick Lowe's peers dye their hair or squeeze into clothes better suited for their children. Lowe has a shock of white hair and titles his latest CD "At My Age." He's 58 and not afraid to admit it. The simple act of not fighting the passage of time led Lowe to a surprising second stage for a career that flowered during the first punk rock generation. Lowe frequently sings from the perspective of a man who's lived a life and learned its lessons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Soul songwriter Jerry Ragovoy wrote one of his more famous tunes - "Time Is On My Side," which turned into a massive hit for the Rolling Stones - under the pseudonym of Norman Meade. He was saving his own name for the works he planned to write one day for Broadway. Instead, Ragovoy found his metier in the 1960s as a pop music producer and writer or co-writer of now-classic records that also included "Cry Baby" and "Piece of My Heart. " Both were covered by Janis Joplin, who heavily relied on him to forge her style.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1998 | JOHN DART
A national survey of 2,000 women who attend conservative evangelical churches reports that despite church condemnation of sex outside marriage, 17% of the never-married and 31% of the divorced say they are sexually active. "Christians are not unresponsive, sexually inhibited and unhappy, as many believe them to be," wrote the Southern California authors of a new book built around the survey, "Secrets of Eve, Understanding the Mystery of Female Sexuality" (Word Publishing).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2006
PROGRAMS Comedy series "Arrested Development," Fox; "Curb Your Enthusiasm," HBO; "The Office," NBC; "Scrubs," NBC; "Two and a Half Men," CBS. Drama series "Grey's Anatomy," ABC; "House," Fox; "The Sopranos," HBO; "24," Fox; "The West Wing," NBC. Miniseries "Masterpiece Theatre: Bleak House," PBS; "Elizabeth I," HBO; "Into the West," TNT; "Sleeper Cell," Showtime. Movie "Flight 93," A&E; "The Flight That Fought Back," Discovery Channel; "The Girl in the Cafe," HBO; "Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2003
GENERAL FIELD Record of the Year: "Crazy in Love," Beyonce featuring Jay-Z (Rich Harrison and Beyonce Knowles, producers; Jim Caruana and Tony Maserati, engineers/mixers); "Where Is the Love," Black Eyed Peas and Justin Timberlake (Ron Fair and will.i.am, producers; Dylan Dresdow and Tony Maserati, engineers/mixers); "Clocks," Coldplay (Coldplay and Ken Nelson, producers; Coldplay, Ken Nelson and Mark Phythian, engineers/mixers); "Lose Yourself," Eminem (Steve King and Michael Strange Jr.
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