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OPINION
February 10, 1991 | Jacob Weisberg, Jacob Weisberg is a senior editor at the New Republic. He interviewed Franklyn G. Jenifer in the university president's office
Franklyn G. Jenifer has written articles on diseases of the turnip and the effect of test results on minority college admissions. A plant-virologist-turned-academic-administrator, Jenifer began to attract national attention last spring, when he was named president of Howard, the nation's premier black university. He is no stranger to the place. Born and raised in Northeast Washington, Jenifer, 51, first applied to Howard in 1957, but was rejected because of his poor grades and test scores.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2014 | Steve Chawkins
Never shy about his revolutionary views, Amiri Baraka gave New Jersey's governor fair warning of possible fireworks when he was named the state's poet laureate. "You're gonna catch hell for this," said Baraka, who began his lengthy literary career as LeRoi Jones. "I can take it," then-Gov. James McGreevey told Baraka at a ceremony in August 2002. A month later, McGreevey was among the many officials angrily calling for Baraka's resignation after the African American poet outraged much of New Jersey with a piece called "Somebody Blew Up America.
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SPORTS
November 26, 1987
Howard University has sued the National Collegiate Athletic Assn. and asked a federal judge to stop this weekend's Division I-AA football playoffs because its team, with a 9-1 record, was excluded. The $9-million suit, which also names the Division I-AA selection committee, charges that the predominantly black school was denied a playoff bid "for unlawful and racially motivated reasons," even though it had a better record than any other team in the playoffs.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2013 | By Becca Clemons
WASHINGTON -- Seven people, including two District of Columbia police officers, were injured after a large crowd rammed a gate at a concert Friday afternoon on Howard University's campus, police and university officials said. At 3:17 p.m., police "received a call for a large crowd ramming the gate" at 6th Street and Howard Place Northwest, a D.C. police spokesman, Officer Paul Metcalf, said. One of the civilians suffered a broken leg, Metcalf said, and all other injuries were minor.
SPORTS
November 28, 1987
The Division I-AA college football playoffs will go on without Howard University today, although a federal judge said the school's $9-million lawsuit against the National Collegiate Athletic Assn. for racial discrimination has merit. U.S.
OPINION
May 29, 1994 | OTESA MIDDLETON and LARRY W. BROWN, Otesa Middleton was editor in chief of Howard University Hilltop newspaper this year. Larry W. Brown was managing editor of the paper
A legacy that took 126 years to build is crumbling before the nation's eyes. The reputation of Howard University as a historic and prestigious African American institution has been damaged by charges of run away anti-Semitism on campus. The origin of the controversy is not hate-ridden teaching in the classroom, but a guest campus speaker, Khallid Abdul Muhammad. What the Nation of Islam leader said last February has sparked a nationwide debate on freedom of speech and black-Jewish relations.
NEWS
August 25, 1992 | LEWIS BEALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He's not a mad scientist. But as Dr. Michael Blakey opens scores of skeleton-filled drawers in his Howard University offices, you can be forgiven if thoughts of grade B horror films fill the air. Blakey acknowledges the evocation, and he smiles. He is not insulted by the connection because he knows his work is not only totally serious but historically and culturally important.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The former president of Howard University, one of the nation's foremost black colleges, warned his fellow higher education administrators Monday to prepare for a contentious debate over affirmative action that could split America "right down the middle." Speaking at the annual American Council on Education conference here, Franklyn G. Jenifer recalled the furor that erupted after Khallid Abdul Muhammad, a former aide to Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, delivered an anti-Semitic speech at Howard University last spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antoine M. Garibaldi, one of four candidates seeking the presidency at Cal State Northridge, offered few specific plans for the campus in a public forum Monday, focusing instead on his experience as an administrator at two of the nation's best-known black universities. Speaking before an audience of about 100, Garibaldi, provost and chief academic officer at Howard University in Washington, D.C., carefully sidestepped hot-button issues during a one-hour question-and-answer session.
NEWS
September 16, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore capped a weeklong focus on his education agenda Friday as he explained why he thinks the federal government should spend more for public education. Addressing more than 1,500 boisterous college Democrats at the predominantly black Howard University, Gore renewed his pledge to make education his "No. 1 priority" as president if elected Nov. 7.
OPINION
May 19, 2013 | By Kevin Hassett
We have once again entered the college commencement season, which means we'll soon be reading about uplifting graduation speeches delivered by prominent Americans. Or at least by prominent liberal Americans. It's becoming increasingly apparent that conservative speakers aren't welcome on college and university campuses. Last month, in the span of a few days, student protests disrupted a presentation by Karl Rove at the University of Massachusetts and one by Rand Paul at Howard University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2010
David Blackwell, a preeminent mathematician and the first black scholar in the National Academy of Sciences, died July 8 at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Berkeley. He was 91 and had had a series of strokes. Blackwell was known as a problem-solver who contributed to many areas, including probability and game theory. "He liked elegance and simplicity," UC Berkeley statistics professor Peter Bickel said. "That is the ultimate best thing in mathematics — if you have an insight that something seemingly complicated is really simple.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2007 | From the Washington Post
If you've ever taken birth control pills or used cortisone to alleviate arthritis pains, you're already familiar with his achievements. But the solutions Percy Julian discovered in the chemistry lab pale in comparison with those he had to devise for survival as a black man living in a segregated society. In a two-hour biography airing at 8 p.m. Tuesday, PBS' "Nova" explores the life of a "Forgotten Genius" who became a renowned research chemist and a lesser-known civil rights pioneer.
BOOKS
December 24, 2006 | Charles McNulty, Charles McNulty is The Times' theater critic.
INVITATIONS rained down on George Gershwin (1898-1937) throughout his short, extraordinary life. The festivities, taking off in the roaring '20s, didn't slow down after the Depression pulled the plug on the Jazz Age. The entertainment industry trundled on, and there were always parties in New York and L.A. for people like him.
BOOKS
June 3, 2001 | DAVID RIEFF, David Rieff is a contributing writer to Book Review
Every generation is vulnerable to imagining itself either uniquely blessed or uniquely cursed. And for an understandable reason. After all, it is simply human nature to attach more importance to the time in which one has been fated to live and die than to either the past or the remoter reaches of the future.
NEWS
September 16, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore capped a weeklong focus on his education agenda Friday as he explained why he thinks the federal government should spend more for public education. Addressing more than 1,500 boisterous college Democrats at the predominantly black Howard University, Gore renewed his pledge to make education his "No. 1 priority" as president if elected Nov. 7.
SPORTS
May 14, 1991
Leo Miles, an NFL official for 22 years and former athletic director at Howard University, was named an NFL supervisor of officials.
SPORTS
December 11, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The NCAA has put Howard University's football program on probation for two years and barred it from postseason competition next year. But the NCAA said the sanctions could have been worse if the school had not triggered the investigation that prompted the penalties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antoine M. Garibaldi, one of four candidates seeking the presidency at Cal State Northridge, offered few specific plans for the campus in a public forum Monday, focusing instead on his experience as an administrator at two of the nation's best-known black universities. Speaking before an audience of about 100, Garibaldi, provost and chief academic officer at Howard University in Washington, D.C., carefully sidestepped hot-button issues during a one-hour question-and-answer session.
BOOKS
June 20, 1999 | THOMAS MCGONIGLE, Thomas McGonigle is the author of "Going to Patchogue" and "The Corpse Dream of N. Petkov."
E.M. Cioran is the essential philosopher for the end, and the beginning, of the millennium. He was born in Romania in 1911, the son of a Romanian Orthodox priest, and his writing today remains a searing antidote to the delusional empirical optimism of the ordinary life. "My vision of the future is so exact," he wrote in 1973, "that if I had children, I should strangle them here and now."
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