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Howards End Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Doing things in a family way in more ways than one, the jury at the 45th Cannes International Film Festival awarded the Palme d'Or to Sweden's "The Best Intentions," directed by Bille August, and gave the best actress prize to his wife, Pernilla August, who was its star. "This is too much, I really don't understand," said a nonplussed August, who previously won the Palme d'Or in 1988 for "Pelle the Conqueror," which went on to take the best foreign language film Oscar in 1989.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1992 | DAVID J. FOX
"Howards End" dominated the annual D.W. Griffith Awards of the National Board of Review, a group of academics, filmmakers, editors and critics. The board selected "Howards End" as best picture of the year and named its director, James Ivory, as best director and star Emma Thompson as best actress.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1992 | JANE GALBRAITH
If there was a bad review for "Howards End," it was pretty hard to find. Newspaper, radio and television critics across the country positively drooled over this latest Ismail Merchant-James Ivory adaptation of an E.M. Forster novel. Not that many people have seen it.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1992 | JANE GALBRAITH
If there was a bad review for "Howards End," it was pretty hard to find. Newspaper, radio and television critics across the country positively drooled over this latest Ismail Merchant-James Ivory adaptation of an E.M. Forster novel. Not that many people have seen it.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1992 | DAVID J. FOX
"Howards End" dominated the annual D.W. Griffith Awards of the National Board of Review, a group of academics, filmmakers, editors and critics. The board selected "Howards End" as best picture of the year and named its director, James Ivory, as best director and star Emma Thompson as best actress.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1992 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten, who is based in London, is a frequent contributor to Calendar
The scene conjures up an England that has not existed for quite a while: an imposing manor house with a garden gently sloping down to offer views of the English Channel lapping languorously against a narrow strip of beach. The sun is hidden by clouds, and a light drizzle falls as three figures hurry arm in arm down the slope.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Surrender to "Howards End." Give yourself willingly to this most assured motion picture, to its remarkable acting and storytelling and the plush richness of its setting. For everyone who's yearned for the dimly remembered satisfactions of traditional filmmaking, for movies of passion, taste and sensitivity that honestly touch every emotion, this is the one you've been waiting for.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
With the Academy Awards arriving in three weeks, it's time to think not only about the winners but about which nominated films will be made into television series. A theatrical movie doesn't have to be an Oscar nominee to gain extended life in prime time, of course. Big box office is a sufficient pedigree, witness the coming series clone of "A League of Their Own."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Doing things in a family way in more ways than one, the jury at the 45th Cannes International Film Festival awarded the Palme d'Or to Sweden's "The Best Intentions," directed by Bille August, and gave the best actress prize to his wife, Pernilla August, who was its star. "This is too much, I really don't understand," said a nonplussed August, who previously won the Palme d'Or in 1988 for "Pelle the Conqueror," which went on to take the best foreign language film Oscar in 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Surrender to "Howards End." Give yourself willingly to this most assured motion picture, to its remarkable acting and storytelling and the plush richness of its setting. For everyone who's yearned for the dimly remembered satisfactions of traditional filmmaking, for movies of passion, taste and sensitivity that honestly touch every emotion, this is the one you've been waiting for.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1992 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten, who is based in London, is a frequent contributor to Calendar
The scene conjures up an England that has not existed for quite a while: an imposing manor house with a garden gently sloping down to offer views of the English Channel lapping languorously against a narrow strip of beach. The sun is hidden by clouds, and a light drizzle falls as three figures hurry arm in arm down the slope.
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