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NEWS
February 23, 1987 | Associated Press
Kansas City Royals Manager Dick Howser resigned today, ending his battle to continue at the helm of the American League team despite a malignant brain tumor. "I've been pushing and pushing since the first operation in Kansas City (last July) and the second operation in Los Angeles (in December)," Howser, 50, told a news conference. "I couldn't do it." On Sunday, a fatigued Howser missed a substantial part of the team's workout.
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BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Huell Howser's desert retreat in Twentynine Palms has sold, along with an adjacent 71-acre parcel, for $650,000 in an all-cash deal. The proceeds from the sale of the late travelogue host's house benefit an endowed scholarship and Howser archives as Chapman University in Orange. There were multiple offers on the Midcentury Modern home, which has 2,221 square feet of living space and sits on 12 acres. Howser renovated the house after he bought the property more than 15 years ago for $160,000.
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SPORTS
July 24, 1986 | United Press International
About 500 letters and cards were delivered to Kansas City Royals Manager Dick Howser Wednesday only hours after doctors explained to him that his brain tumor was malignant, a spokesman for the team said. A portion of the two-inch tumor was removed in a three-hour operation Tuesday, but doctors who removed the growth would not give a prognosis until complete pathology results become available later this week. "He's in outstanding spirits," Jeff Coy, a spokesman for the Royals, said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Huell Howser's house in Twentynine Palms has come on the market at $395,000. Proceeds from the sale of the late travelogue host's desert retreat will go to Chapman University. The Midcentury Modern home, built in 1953, has 2,221 square feet of living space that Howser renovated after he bought the property more than 15 years ago for $160,000. He infused the interiors with industrial-style minimalist details including concrete kitchen counters and floors, stainless-steel baseboards and a master bath sink made by inverting a vintage streetlight fixture.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2009
The paean to Huell Howser ["The Awe of Huell Howser," July 26] seems heartfelt but is laughable when confronted with what he actually presents. I confess I've never been able to watch much of his shows, since I find his manner insufferably homespun and his subjects generally boring as dirt. There's a place for celebrating the wonders of the simple and the local, finding a kind of Zen epiphany in the everyday. I have no doubt there are many fascinating stories out there, and the right personality or style in an inquiring mind could present them effectively.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1999
The co-founder of a San Francisco-based Internet investment and consulting firm won the bidding for the "drugs.com" Internet domain name. Tony Hsieh prevailed in the two-week auction with a bid of $823,456, said Jason Tinsley, chief operating officer of GreatDomains.com, the Chatsworth domain-name broker that supervised the auction. Before starting Venture Frogs in San Francisco, Hsieh co-founded LinkExchange, which helps companies place their banner ads on Web sites. Microsoft purchased LinkExchange last year in a deal reportedly worth $250 million.
SPORTS
October 1, 1985 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Strike three to Reggie Jackson had been history for more than a half-hour, a final out that enabled Kansas City's Bret Saberhagen to make history on this chilly Monday night in Missouri. By beating the Angels, 3-1, Saberhagen forged a first-place tie atop the American League West standings while becoming the major leagues' fifth youngest pitcher to win 20 games in one season. The man he supplanted: One George Herman (Babe) Ruth, who won 20 games as a 21-year-old with the Boston Red Sox.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Night after night, no industry gets as much free TV publicity as sports. That's because TV and sports feed on each other. Hence, the level of local sports reporting is pretty low, with sportscasters usually relegated to being shills and cheerleaders for home teams. You get taped highlights, maybe a live (why does it have to be live?) stand-up interview with a Dodger or Angel and that's all. Oh, occasionally someone tries to get tough--usually on the wrong issue for the wrong reason.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | United Press International
Dick Howser, stricken with brain cancer less than a year after managing the Kansas City Royals to the World Series title in 1985, died today at age 51. Howser died at 2:45 p.m. at St. Luke's Hospital, a hospital spokeswoman said.
SPORTS
July 26, 1986 | Associated Press
The Kansas City Royals said Friday that Manager Dick Howser will undergo about five weeks of radiation treatments for the cancerous tumor found in his brain earlier this week. But the team declined to provide detailed results of pathological tests. The club released a statement saying that Dr. Charles Clough, the neurosurgeon who operated on Howser Tuesday at St.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Nearly a year after he died, beloved television host Huell Howser is being commemorated with a special tribute on KCET. The channel -- the nation's largest independent public television station -- issued a call to fans to vote on their all-time favorite episodes of Howser's shows "California's Gold" and "Visiting with Huell Howser. " Each episode of the former, which was Howser's most popular show, features Howser introducing viewers to very special places and people in California.
NEWS
January 30, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes area is a little-traveled patch of California that Huell Howser loved and "Wow-ed!" about. The PBS TV host visited the 18-mile coastal stretch from Pismo Beach to Point Sal several times, filmed it for his " California's Golden Coast" series and helped campaign for a museum on the site. The Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center in Guadalupe became a reality in 1999, and now the center will pay tribute to one of its biggest fans with a memorial hike on Feb. 9. Howser, 67, died of prostate cancer Jan. 7. "He organized fundraisers and gave some speeches," Lindsey Whitaker, education and administrative coordinator for the Dunes Center, said Tuesday.
TRAVEL
January 20, 2013
Golden moment with Huell Howser I will never forget the day at the end of 1998 that my friend Eva and I met Huell Howser ["What Made Him Huell," by Christopher Reynolds, Jan.13]. We had just visited St. Sophia Cathedral, inspired by one of Howser's shows, and afterward went to C&K (Greek) Importing for lunch. To our amazement and delight, in walked Howser, the nicest guy in the world. He graciously allowed us to take a group photo with himself and the owner of the restaurant, Papa Cristo, one of his many friends.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2013 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
Public television star Huell Howser, who died this month of prostate cancer, did not talk openly about his illness because "he never wanted the story to be about him," his assistant said. The host of the TV series "California's Gold," which focused on unique and commonplace locales around the state, died Jan. 7 at his home in Palm Springs. "He was dedicated to doing his job even when he was sick," said Ryan Morris, his assistant of seven years. Howser had ambitious plans last year for the show that he ended up having to cancel, Morris said.
OPINION
January 17, 2013
Re "Fans bid Howser farewell," Jan. 16 When Huell Howser passed away, he apparently made it very clear to his friends and loved ones that he did not want a memorial service. It's a shame that L.A. City Councilman Tom LaBonge felt that he knew best and organized a memorial service for Howser at the Griffith Observatory. Was it well attended? Certainly; people loved Howser and wanted to honor him. Was it respectful? Absolutely not. LaBonge showed little respect to Howser by blatantly disregarding his final wishes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2013 | Nita Lelyveld
Everyone thought they knew what Huell Howser would have said if he'd been standing outside Griffith Observatory just before sunset Tuesday afternoon. If he'd climbed the observatory steps in a short-sleeved button down, khakis and work boots and taken in the hundreds who had come to celebrate him, a crowd stretching in glorious honeyed light beyond the Astronomers Monument and into the overflowing parking lot. If he'd known that his fans had started arriving about 9 a.m. for a public memorial due to start at 3:30 p.m., that among them were teenagers and nonagenarians, some of whom had driven for hours -- from the far-flung California cities and small towns he'd visited, from the mountains and deserts he loved.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | JANICE ARKATOV, Janice Arkatov is a free-lance arts writer
In his almost six years at KCET, Tennessee-born Huell Howser has established himself as Southern California's amiable man-about-town. His "California Gold" series and Emmy-nominated "Videolog" segments have introduced viewers to a memorable collection of "real people." On Sunday night he launches "Visiting ... with Huell Howser," a 26-episode, half-hour interview series, inspired by the success of last year's 10-part "Videolog Listens."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
I am a fan of Huell Howser, the roving reporter. I state this without irony or any attempt to be provocative. I think of him as a kind of natural wonder, practically the last living representative of local television in Los Angeles, and for all I know, in America, that species having largely been crushed under the weight of media conglomeration.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
A self-proclaimed "super fan" of Huell Howser, the beloved host of "California's Gold" who died Jan. 6, is staging a grass-roots effort to put together a tribute book that will honor the folksy public television host. Robert DaGasta, a buyer and seller of pop culture memorabilia, has been traveling around the city visiting numerous locales that Howser featured in his program to solicit "tribute pages" that would feature photos and remembrances of Howser. The pages, he said, give locals a chance to say farewell to Howser in a personal way. "We love Huell, and we really wanted to do something to honor him," DaGasta said.
OPINION
January 9, 2013
Re "Folksy television host," Obituary, Jan. 8 Huell Howser was no hick with a microphone. I knew him for more than 30 years, and believe me, what we saw on TV was only part of him. Yes, the exuberance was sincere. He was extremely bright and complex, however, with an edge to his thinking that never surfaced on the screen. He had strong opinions about many things, including historic preservation - that was his passion. And also media. Privately, he was savagely critical of contemporary media, especially local TV news, which he felt, rightly, observed Los Angeles almost exclusively through a distorted prism of street violence and celebrities.
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