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NEWS
September 13, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
A reinvigorated Michele Bachmann continued her assault on Rick Perry on Tuesday morning, accusing the Texas governor and rival GOP presidential candidate of “crony capitalism” in connection with his state's program requiring the vaccination of young girls against human papillomavirus. She had some help from Sarah Palin, who told Fox News that she supported Bachmann's efforts Bachmann's criticism of Perry on Monday night at the CNN/Tea Party Express GOP presidential debate provided one of the debate's true fiery moments.
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OPINION
December 18, 2013 | Julia Belluz and Steven J. Hoffman, Julia Belluz is a health journalist and a Knight Science Journalism Fellow at MIT. Twitter: @juliaoftoronto. Steven J. Hoffman is an assistant professor of clinical epidemiology and biostatistics at McMaster University, a visiting assistant professor at the Harvard School of Public Health and a Trudeau scholar. Twitter: @shoffmania
An email with the subject line "OMG" recently came from one of our mothers, and it contained chilling information about the HPV vaccine. "200 people have died from it," Mom claimed, "and it does not even last long enough to prevent cervical cancer. " Her source was not her doctor, a new study or the Food and Drug Administration. Her information came from a recent episode of Katie Couric's ABC talk show about "all sides" of the "HPV controversy. " Since then, most of the alarmist vaccine claims made in the episode have been debunked.
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NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
This year's Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, released online Monday, brought Americans good news and bad.  Extending a trend since the early 1990s, authors reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that cancer deaths have continued to fall in the United States, with rates declining 1.5% per year for all cancers, in both sexes combined, from 2000 to 2009.  Deaths from the most common cancers - including lung,...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Katie Couric may want to brush up on her reporting skills before she takes on her new role as "global anchor" at Yahoo! , according to a number of critics displeased with a report about the HPV vaccine on her syndicated talk show, "Katie. " In a segment that aired Wednesday, Couric and a panel of guests discussed the supposed controversy surrounding the vaccine, known as Gardasil, which prevents transmission of a sexually transmitted disease that affects an estimated 79 million Americans and has been linked to numerous forms of cancer, particularly cervical.
NEWS
November 18, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A Food and Drug Administration advisory committee Wednesday recommended that the agency extend approval of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Gardasil for protection against anal cancer in males and females ages 9 through 26. The agency is not required to follow the recommendations of its advisory committees, but it generally does so. Anal cancer is relatively uncommon, striking about 5,000 Americans each year. About 90% of cases are thought to be caused by HPV. Gardasil protects against four of the most common strains of HPV. It is already licensed for protection against cervical cancer in women and against genital warts in both sexes ages 9 to 26. The new indication was based primarily on a clinical trial conducted among 4,065 men, 602 of them gay. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either three doses of the vaccine or a placebo.
HEALTH
June 14, 1999 | BARBARA J. CHUCK
You've just gotten the diagnosis: You have genital warts. But what does this mean? Human papillomavirus, or HPV, is the virus that causes genital warts. Genital HPV is usually spread from person to person during sexual activity. But there are other facts you should know about HPV: Certain strains of HPV can increase a woman's risk of contracting cancer of the cervix. The virus does cause genital warts, but, even if you have no warts, you can still have the virus. And you can still give HPV to your partner during sex. It's hard to know when you became infected because you can have the virus for years without any signs or symptoms.
NEWS
April 7, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
People who have lung cancer are more likely to have antibodies to a high-risk form of human papilloma virus, according to research presented Monday. Certain strains of human papilloma virus -- or HPV -- can cause cervical cancer. Researchers from France ran tests on 1,633 lung cancer patients and 2,729 healthy people and found a low rate of antibodies to high-risk HPV strains in the people without lung cancer -- less than 5% of participants. But the incidence was significantly higher in people with lung cancer, and those rates did not differ based on whether they were current smokers, former smokers or had never smoked.
MAGAZINE
April 29, 1990
A monogamous 45-year old woman, I had been warned for several months about steam rooms by my friend, who had been battling HPV since she--a monogamous 44-year old--got it from the steam room at her gym. Now, a year later, having had nearly a dozen treatments (still not finished) to rid myself and my husband of the virus, let me cry loud and clear: Beware wet heat! HPV thrives in it! NAME WITHHELD Venice
BUSINESS
December 4, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
The anti-vaccination movement has long been a public menace. It's responsible for the resurgence of numerous serious diseases that were on the decline, including measles, mumps and whooping cough. Now the movement has been given a big booster shot by Katie Couric, who devoted a large portion of her daily talk show Wednesday to some highly emotional and scientifically dubious claims by critics of Gardasil, a leading vaccine for human papillomavirus, or HPV. The segment focused on a mother convinced that her 20-year-old daughter died after a cycle of Gardasil immunization, and a second family whose 14-year-old daughter fell ill after the shots.
OPINION
February 23, 2009
Re "1 in 4 teens got cervical cancer vaccine in '07," Feb. 18 Gardasil, the cervical cancer vaccine, has been widely accepted in California, but it is not 100% effective. Most cervical cancers are caused by a very common sexually transmitted infection -- the human papillomavirus (HPV). There are more than a dozen high-risk strains of HPV capable of causing cervical cancer, but the vaccine only protects against four strains of HPV, two of which are known to cause 70% of cervical cancer cases.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
The anti-vaccination movement has long been a public menace. It's responsible for the resurgence of numerous serious diseases that were on the decline, including measles, mumps and whooping cough. Now the movement has been given a big booster shot by Katie Couric, who devoted a large portion of her daily talk show Wednesday to some highly emotional and scientifically dubious claims by critics of Gardasil, a leading vaccine for human papillomavirus, or HPV. The segment focused on a mother convinced that her 20-year-old daughter died after a cycle of Gardasil immunization, and a second family whose 14-year-old daughter fell ill after the shots.
SCIENCE
July 25, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Although HPV vaccinations can reduce the risk of cancer-causing infections in adolescent girls by half, immunization rates across the United States have stalled over the last year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At a Thursday press briefing, health officials said they were alarmed to find that despite the vaccine's proven effectiveness and safety, both parents and doctors were failing to ensure that teens received the three-dose human papillomavirus vaccine along with other recommended shots.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
The HPV vaccine may be controversial, but it works, new research shows. The rate of HPV infection among teenage girls dropped from 11.5% in the “pre-vaccine era” to 5.1% in the “vaccine era,” researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Wednesday in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. That's a drop of 56%, the study notes. The infection rates cover the four types of HPV that are targeted by the vaccines Gardasil and Cervarix. Human papillomaviruses are the most common cause of sexually transmitted infections, and more than half of people who are sexually active become infected with one of the more than 40 types of HPV that are known to spread during vaginal, oral or anal sex, according to the National Cancer Institute . HPVs are responsible for nearly all cases of cervical cancer, along with most cases of anal cancer, the NCI says.
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Parents forgo vaccines for their teenage kids for a number of reasons, researchers said Monday in a paper reporting findings from the annual National Immunization Survey of Teens, which was published in the journal Pediatrics.  That might mean that public health agencies need to try new things to get immunizations on target to prevent spread of the human papilloma virus, the cause of cervical and other cancers. Overall, immunization rates among teenagers are on the way up, the Pediatrics study noted.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control said Tuesday that vaccination coverage levels in U.S. adults were “unacceptably low,” and that public health workers need to do more to make sure adults got immunizations to protect them from diseases including whooping cough, shingles and pneumonia. The team, writing in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report , updated statistics on vaccine coverage for  those diseases as well as cervical cancer, hepatitis A and B and other preventable illnesses.  There were “modest gains” in coverage for the Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis)
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
This year's Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, released online Monday, brought Americans good news and bad.  Extending a trend since the early 1990s, authors reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that cancer deaths have continued to fall in the United States, with rates declining 1.5% per year for all cancers, in both sexes combined, from 2000 to 2009.  Deaths from the most common cancers - including lung,...
NEWS
September 13, 2011 | By Melanie Mason
Rep. Michele Bachmann's new line of attack against GOP frontrunner Gov. Rick Perry -- launched Monday night at the CNN/Tea Party Express debate and continued on Tuesday's morning talk shows -- pins the Texas governor's ties to a pharmaceutical giant as the reason for his controversial decision to require the HPV vaccine for Texas schoolgirls. “The drug company gave thousands of dollars in political donations to the governor, and this is just flat-out wrong,” Bachmann asserted in Monday night's debate.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Patt Morrison
Wow. Can you believe it? Tetanus vaccinations do not make children likelier to walk barefoot on rusty nails. Masturbation does not cause blindness or hairy palms. And girls who get the HPV vaccination to protect against the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus, the cause of 70% of cervical cancer, do not turn slutty because of it. For this we actually had a study -- a sober, clinical response to the notional premise afoot in segments of American politics and culture that the vaccine, which can give young girls a lifetime's protection from cervical cancer, loosens their morals.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
A shot that would make girls more inclined to have sex. When the HPV vaccine came on the scene, there were some who had that fear: This shot will reduce worries about a harmful sexually transmitted infection -- and reduce girls' inhibitions as well. And girls could mistakenly believe it's a magic bullet against pregnancy and other sexually transmitted diseases too. A new study kicks those fears to the curb. Researchers looked at girls who'd had an HPV vaccine and tracked the appointments they made and the advice they sought regarding sexual health over the next three years.
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