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NEWS
September 12, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Sensing vulnerability, Michele Bachmann and Rick Santorum went after Rick Perry - hard - on his order, while governor of Texas, to force young girls to be vaccinated against the human papillomavirus. In doing so, they sparked the sharpest exchange of the debate so far. During the CNN/Tea Party Express debate in Tampa, Bachmann also accused Perry of favoring a large pharamceutical company, Merck, in pushing the program. Perry said he made a mistake is issuing an executive order forcing the vaccinations, but he said he erred on the side of trying to prevent a deadly cancer.
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NEWS
September 8, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The HPV vaccine, approved in 2006, requires three shots over a six-month period -- a regimen that is inconvenient and costly. But a new study shows a two-dose vaccine may work as well. The vaccine prevents infection from certain strains of the human papilloma virus, which can cause cervical cancer. It is considered revolutionary because it's the first vaccine to prevent a type of cancer. (It was even a topic of Wednesday night's Republican presidential candidates' debate because of Texas Gov. Rick Perry's proposal to mandate the vaccine in his state.)
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Popular fears about vaccines -- including the belief that the measles, mumps and rubella shot causes autism -- are unfounded, a study released Thursday by the Institute of Medicine reported. But another report released Thursday, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, noted with some alarm that many parents still shun another recommended vaccine: the three-shot series that protects against human papilloma virus (HPV), a widespread sexually transmitted virus, some types of which can cause cervical cancer.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
In a move hailed by planned-parenting groups and opposed by some religious organizations, health insurance companies will be required to provide women free birth control, in keeping with new Obama administration guidelines. The rules, called "historic" by the Department of Health and Human Services, also say that insurance companies must provide women with other preventive services free of charge. Monday's new quidelines follow the recent advice from an independent panel of doctors and health experts at the Institute of Medicine, which recommended last month that all approved contraception methods -- including the "morning-after pill" -- be provided without requiring co-pays.
NEWS
May 19, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Women 30 and older who've been told they can safely wait three years between cervical cancer screenings can relax. Such advice appears to be true for those who've had normal Pap smears and negative human papillomavirus (HPV) test results. A new study of more than 300,000 women confirms current guidelines that say women don't need to be screened every year for the disease. The study also suggests that the HPV test alone might be better at assessing future risk of cervical cancer than a Pap smear alone -- and almost as accurate as combining the two screenings.
NEWS
April 7, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
People who have lung cancer are more likely to have antibodies to a high-risk form of human papilloma virus, according to research presented Monday. Certain strains of human papilloma virus -- or HPV -- can cause cervical cancer. Researchers from France ran tests on 1,633 lung cancer patients and 2,729 healthy people and found a low rate of antibodies to high-risk HPV strains in the people without lung cancer -- less than 5% of participants. But the incidence was significantly higher in people with lung cancer, and those rates did not differ based on whether they were current smokers, former smokers or had never smoked.
NEWS
February 2, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
To no one's surprise, a new clinical trial demonstrates that the human papilloma virus vaccine Gardasil is as good at protecting men as it is in protecting women, researchers reported Wednesday. A clinical trial in more than 4,000 boys and men demonstrated that the vaccine was more than 90% successful in preventing genital lesions caused by the four strains of HPV that the vaccine is active against, about the same level of protection demonstrated for women. The vaccine is currently approved in the United States for both males and females over the age of 9, but current recommendations call for administration only to females.
NEWS
December 22, 2010 | Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Gardasil , the vaccine that can prevent most cases of cervical cancer in girls, has won the FDA's blessing as a vaccine to prevent anal cancer, a rare but growing diagnosis in the United States. The drug agency's approval for Gardasil as an anal cancer vaccine opens the way for the medication's maker, Merck and Co. Inc., to market the vaccine to boys and young men between the ages of nine and 26. The FDA's decision could theoretically double the number of children and young adults urged to take the vaccine.
NEWS
November 18, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A Food and Drug Administration advisory committee Wednesday recommended that the agency extend approval of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Gardasil for protection against anal cancer in males and females ages 9 through 26. The agency is not required to follow the recommendations of its advisory committees, but it generally does so. Anal cancer is relatively uncommon, striking about 5,000 Americans each year. About 90% of cases are thought to be caused by HPV. Gardasil protects against four of the most common strains of HPV. It is already licensed for protection against cervical cancer in women and against genital warts in both sexes ages 9 to 26. The new indication was based primarily on a clinical trial conducted among 4,065 men, 602 of them gay. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either three doses of the vaccine or a placebo.
NEWS
November 9, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
The HPV vaccine was approved in 2006 as the first vaccine that can prevent a type of cancer. The vaccine protects against several common strains of human papilloma virus, which causes genital warts and can lead to cervical cancer. However, a new study show that a majority of young women who are eligible for the vaccine are either not getting it or are not following the three-shot protocol to be fully immunized. Researchers from the University of Maryland analyzed data from 9,658 teenagers and young women who were eligible for the HPV vaccination at the University of Maryland Medical Center between August 2006 and August 2010.
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