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February 3, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
A Japanese firm told state legislators Friday that it is willing to pay for a $30-million-per-mile, magnetically levitated commuter rail line connecting downtown Los Angeles, Orange County and the San Fernando Valley in exchange for rights of way along freeway medians and an exclusive operating agreement. Eiji Ikeda, general manager of HSST Corp.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1991 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To show that high-speed commuter trains propelled by exotic magnetic-levitation technology can work in Los Angeles, a Japanese firm is considering construction of a demonstration line in the San Fernando Valley costing up to $120 million. The four-mile line between Chatsworth and the Warner Center commercial complex in Woodland Hills would be the first in the nation to be used by mag-lev trains, which float above tracks on electromagnetic "cushions." HSST Corp.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
A Japanese firm told state legislators Friday that it is willing to pay for a $30-million-per-mile, magnetically levitated commuter rail line linking downtown Los Angeles, Orange County and the San Fernando Valley in exchange for rights of way along the freeways and an exclusive operating agreement. General Manager Eiji Ikeda of the Japanese HSST Corp.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
A Japanese firm told state legislators Friday that it is willing to pay for a $30-million-per-mile, magnetically levitated commuter rail line connecting downtown Los Angeles, Orange County and the San Fernando Valley in exchange for rights of way along freeway medians and an exclusive operating agreement. Eiji Ikeda, general manager of HSST Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1991 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To show that high-speed commuter trains propelled by exotic magnetic-levitation technology can work in Los Angeles, a Japanese firm is considering construction of a demonstration line in the San Fernando Valley costing up to $120 million. The four-mile line between Chatsworth and the Warner Center commercial complex in Woodland Hills would be the first in the nation to be used by mag-lev trains, which float above tracks on electromagnetic "cushions." HSST Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN
Orange County's tollway agencies formed a task force Thursday to explore the possibility of installing rail transit systems along the routes of three planned toll facilities. "In my opinion, it is incumbent upon the boards of directors of these agencies to examine all aspects of transit," said San Juan Capistrano Mayor Gary L. Hausdorfer. Hausdorfer and Costa Mesa Mayor Peter F.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials of a business consortium that proposes to build an 80-m.p.h. magnetic levitation rail line from Los Angeles International Airport to Palmdale said Friday that the first phase of the line, from the airport to Santa Clarita, would cost "a little in excess of $1 billion." The estimate, from John E. Chiaverini, senior vice president of the Perini Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN
Officials from five Orange County cities have agreed to seek bids in July for the private construction and operation of an 18-mile, central county monorail system. A contract would be awarded to the finalist in February, 1991. "We're definitely on our way," Santa Ana Mayor Daniel H. Young said Tuesday. "We will emphasize first that we are interested in a privately owned and operated system, although we will identify incentives, such as (monorail) station development rights."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1991 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles city lawmakers cast a cloud over plans to buy a three-mile-long rail line between Warner Center and Chatsworth when they balked Wednesday at the $23-million price tag for the railroad right of way. The Los Angeles City Council's Transportation Committee voted to have the city spend only $5.75 million as its share for the property, an action that, in effect, rejected a previous Los Angeles County Transportation Commission plan for the city and commission to split the $23-million cost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1990 | JAMES QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spurned by the state in a recent competition to select privately built transportation projects, Los Angeles city and county officials Wednesday announced their own program under which firms will be invited to build toll highways and rail projects on public land. The program, which might require approval by the Legislature, is patterned after one launched last month by Caltrans under which four toll roads were chosen for state approval from eight projects submitted by private bidders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
A Japanese firm told state legislators Friday that it is willing to pay for a $30-million-per-mile, magnetically levitated commuter rail line linking downtown Los Angeles, Orange County and the San Fernando Valley in exchange for rights of way along the freeways and an exclusive operating agreement. General Manager Eiji Ikeda of the Japanese HSST Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1990 | JAMES QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spurned by the state in a recent competition to select privately built transportation projects, Los Angeles city and county officials Wednesday announced their own program under which firms will be invited to build toll highways and rail projects on public land. The program, which might require approval by the Legislature, is patterned after one launched last month by Caltrans under which four toll roads were chosen for state approval from eight projects submitted by private bidders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1991
Back in May, when I first proposed that our local transit tax money be put to use right here in Los Angeles to produce electric cars, electric buses, trains, an advanced technology rail system, the idea was received with mixed reaction. On one side, the public saw the possibilities and expressed its enthusiasm and strong support for the proposal with letters to the editor and calls to my office. The public saw this as an opportunity to accomplish two objectives: preserve local jobs and keep Metro Rail dollars here at home.
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