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Huddie Leadbelly Ledbetter

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1988 | STEVE HOCHMAN
More than a dozen of pop's most distinguished artists--from Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen and U2 to Los Lobos and Tom Waits--are teaming up on record to honor three giants of American music. No one with a knowledge of pop history will be surprised that two of the songwriters honored on what promises to be one of the year's most celebrated albums are Dust Bowl balladeer Woody Guthrie and folk-blues pioneer Leadbelly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1988 | STEVE HOCHMAN
More than a dozen of pop's most distinguished artists--from Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen and U2 to Los Lobos and Tom Waits--are teaming up on record to honor three giants of American music. No one with a knowledge of pop history will be surprised that two of the songwriters honored on what promises to be one of the year's most celebrated albums are Dust Bowl balladeer Woody Guthrie and folk-blues pioneer Leadbelly.
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NEWS
March 12, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Elie Siegmeister, an American composer whose symphonic studies ranged from the speeches of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. to the folk songs of Woody Guthrie and Huddie (Leadbelly) Ledbetter, died of a brain tumor Sunday. He was 82 and died here in a hospital near his Long Island home in Great Neck.
NEWS
December 25, 1986 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Question: Could you give me some information about Alex Schomburg, the famous comic book artist whose work appears to be demanding top dollars these days?--C.T. Answer: A number of readers have asked about Schomburg's artwork. The December issue of the Collectors Showcase auction catalogue (1708 N. Vine St., Hollywood, Calif. 90028), is offering a full-color cover painting by Schomburg in the $2,000-to-$3,000 range.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1986 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
Eric Andersen was part of the same Greenwich Village folk scene that spawned Bob Dylan and Joan Baez in the early 1960s. In the ensuing years, many of his contemporaries have gone on to bigger and better things. Andersen, on the other hand, seems caught in a time warp.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1988 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
Watch Bill Thompson perform around town with his hot new blues band, the Mighty Penguins, and you'll see a man who after years of searching has finally found his musical niche. His rangy tenor rings with the hollow desperation of Clarence (Gatemouth) Brown and the impassioned hollering of Huddie (Leadbelly) Ledbetter. His blazing electric guitar work is saddled with the piercing sustained-note leads of T-Bone Walker and the frenzied chicken-picking riffs of Albert Lee and Danny Gatton.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
Folklife specialist David Taylor was in the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress sorting through photographs he had taken of Italian-Americans in San Pedro, Calif. "This one shows a statue of the Virgin Mary cradling a fishing boat in Mary Star of the Sea Catholic Church, the parish of many Italian-American families," Taylor told Alan Jabbour, Folklife Center director. "San Pedro residents call Mary Star of the Sea the church fishermen-built," said Taylor.
NEWS
September 17, 2000 | TED ANTHONY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
She'd sing it wherever she went in those days--around the neighborhood, hanging the wash outside her family's wooden shack, and especially when folks would gather to play some harmonica, pick some banjo and push the blues away. Everyone knew the song was old, though they weren't sure where it came from. But in 1937, around Middlesboro's desperately poor Noetown section, it came from the mouth of the miner's daughter who lived by the railroad tracks, the girl named Georgia Turner.
MAGAZINE
January 25, 2004 | Ed Cray, Ed Cray is a journalism professor at the Annenberg School for Communication at USC and the author of biographies of George C. Marshall and Earl Warren. "Ramblin' Man" will be published next month by W.W. Norton & Co.
Woody Guthrie's childhood in small-town Oklahoma was hard. His sister Clara died in a fire; his father Charley, an ambitious businessman, would be destroyed by the economic downturns ravaging the state in the early decades of the 20th century; his mentally ill mother Nora would be institutionalized after setting her sleeping husband on fire. Woody himself would be passed from family to family during the next couple of years.
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