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Huey Newton

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1989
I read with mixed feelings articles in The Times Aug. 23 on Huey Newton; a saga on an exciting and dangerous life. If Ollie North can be a hero in the minds of so many people, why can't Huey Newton? K.B. SANDERS, Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Black Against Empire The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party Joshua Bloom and Waldo E. Martin Jr.University of California Press: 560 pp., $34.95 The defenders of the 2nd Amendment once had a powerful ally in America: the Black Panthers. The self-styled revolutionaries believed there's something powerful and liberating about holding a firearm in your hands. In "Black Against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party," we learn that Huey Newton and Bobby Seale felt lots of gun love as they drove up and down the streets of Oakland in 1966.
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NEWS
June 20, 1987 | Associated Press
Former Black Panther Party leader Huey Newton, serving a two-year prison term for illegal weapons possession, on Friday was ordered tried on embezzlement charges relating to a now-defunct school operated by the party. Newton and another school official, Mark Alexander, appeared in Oakland Municipal Court for a preliminary hearing, then were ordered held for trial on charges of embezzlement and misappropriation of funds at Oakland Community School.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2008 | Zachary Lazar
There's a Riot Going On Revolutionaries, Rock Stars, and the Rise and Fall of the '60s Peter Doggett Canongate: 598 pp., $27.50 WHAT DO we do in 2008 with Eldridge Cleaver, Huey Newton, Stokely Carmichael, Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin? As cultural icons, they remain fascinatingly vivid, 40 years after their heyday. And yet as models of political action, they offer less than nothing -- less, because their weaknesses for hyperbole and self-aggrandizement still dog what cannot even be called the "Left" anymore, so far has our culture moved to the right.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2002 | MARK SACHS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was nearly 13 years ago on an Oakland street that activist Huey Newton's turbulent life met with a violent end that shocked few, shot down by a 24-year-old drug dealer. Newton, who in 1966 co-founded the Black Panther Party with Bobby Seale, was only 47, but in truth had been in decline for several years, beaten down by ongoing legal skirmishes and an equally daunting array of vices. Tonight at 9 on KCET, however, the radical icon is resurrected with a vengeance in "A Huey P.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | Associated Press
A 27-year-old Oakland man described as a small-time drug dealer was convicted Wednesday of killing Black Panther co-founder Huey Newton to gain standing with a prison gang. Tyrone Robinson was found guilty of first-degree murder in the death of Newton, who was shot in the head three times near a West Oakland crack house on Aug. 22, 1989. Sentencing was set for Nov. 25.
NEWS
April 17, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Former Black Panther leader Huey Newton has been arrested and charged with stealing public funds in connection with an Oakland child care and nutrition program he once ran, Atty. Gen. John Van de Kamp said Tuesday. Newton, 43, was arrested at his home in Oakland Monday after a three-year investigation of discrepancies in financial records of his now-defunct Educational Opportunities Corp., the attorney general said in a statement.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN and VALARIE BASHEDA, Times Staff Writers
Huey P. Newton, a co-founder of the radical Black Panther Party who was revered as a hero and reviled as a criminal, was shot three times in the head and killed Tuesday in a violent, drug-plagued area of West Oakland. Police declined to speculate on a motive for the predawn shooting, although Newton, 47, had been sentenced earlier this year to 90 days in San Quentin Prison for possessing drug paraphernalia, which was a violation of his parole in an earlier case.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1995 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Old radicals don't die, they just get recycled as pop imagery. In the 1970s, the bearded and bereted Che Guevara graced a poster that was de rigueur for campus lefties' dorm rooms. More recently, the mark of Malcolm X turned up as the logo on a baseball cap. Now, with the Melvin and Mario Van Peebles film "Panther," at least two stage works and a number of books and articles on the Black Panthers due out this year, Huey P.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Black Against Empire The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party Joshua Bloom and Waldo E. Martin Jr.University of California Press: 560 pp., $34.95 The defenders of the 2nd Amendment once had a powerful ally in America: the Black Panthers. The self-styled revolutionaries believed there's something powerful and liberating about holding a firearm in your hands. In "Black Against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party," we learn that Huey Newton and Bobby Seale felt lots of gun love as they drove up and down the streets of Oakland in 1966.
OPINION
February 24, 2005
Re " 'Gonzo' Journalist Thompson Kills Self," Feb. 21: Now that Hunter S. Thompson has committed suicide, one can truly say that the '60s have ended forever. Funny how most of the main radical players of those heady days have now been laid to rest, for one reason or another. Eldridge Cleaver, Huey Newton, Jerry Rubin, Abby Hoffman, etc., have all passed on. Thompson was, if nothing else, an entertaining fellow who could hardly be taken seriously even in his prime. The same could be said now for most of the "Movement" of the '60s, with this many years gone by. The vitality and hipness of that age seems to have dulled and is revisited more for the sake of curiosity than for any significant meaning.
OPINION
June 26, 2003
Just days after I delivered a paper on the mass media's distortion of the Black Panther Party, I read Kate Coleman's effort to discredit a conference on the "Black Panther Party in Historical Perspective" at Wheelock College in Boston ("Just a Pack of Predators," Opinion, June 22). Coleman's piece is a transparent effort to sustain a media distortion that has been around for decades. Namely, that the Panthers were a "bunch of thugs." Coleman reduces the nationwide Black Panther Party to the actions of Huey Newton and members of his Oakland coterie who engaged in criminal and violent conduct well after the national Panthers went into decline.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2002 | MARK SACHS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was nearly 13 years ago on an Oakland street that activist Huey Newton's turbulent life met with a violent end that shocked few, shot down by a 24-year-old drug dealer. Newton, who in 1966 co-founded the Black Panther Party with Bobby Seale, was only 47, but in truth had been in decline for several years, beaten down by ongoing legal skirmishes and an equally daunting array of vices. Tonight at 9 on KCET, however, the radical icon is resurrected with a vengeance in "A Huey P.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1995 | EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON, Earl Ofari Hutchinson is author of "The Assassination of the Black Male Image" (Middle Passage Press). He also publishes a bimonthly newsletter on African American issues
Perhaps it was inevitable that Black Panther founder Huey Newton would be put on stage ("Taking Huey Newton Off Posters and Onto the Stage," Calendar, Jan. 19). Society's social rebels often become the stuff of books, paintings, plays or films. The problem is that they are either demonized or idolized. This could easily happen with the Panthers. Their story is loaded with tragedy, heroism, idealism and stupidity.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1995 | PHILIP BRANDES
As the title suggests, "A Huey P. Newton Story" at the Actors' Gang makes no claim to being the definitive portrait of the late Black Panthers co-founder. How could it? Newton's life was a turbulent swirl of contradictions--street fighter, poet, political tactician, cocaine addict, accused murderer and self-taught scholar. He was equally at home quoting Shakespeare or busting heads.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1995 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Old radicals don't die, they just get recycled as pop imagery. In the 1970s, the bearded and bereted Che Guevara graced a poster that was de rigueur for campus lefties' dorm rooms. More recently, the mark of Malcolm X turned up as the logo on a baseball cap. Now, with the Melvin and Mario Van Peebles film "Panther," at least two stage works and a number of books and articles on the Black Panthers due out this year, Huey P.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge ordered Tyrone Robinson to serve the maximum sentence of 32 years to life for the murder of Huey Newton, saying that Robinson's extensive criminal record "indicates a pattern of violent behavior." Robinson, 27, was convicted of first-degree murder in October. Newton, 47, who founded the Black Panther Party in 1966 with Bobby Seale, was gunned down Aug. 22, 1989, in a pre-dawn slaying in West Oakland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1994 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying a battle with city officials was threatening to cripple their organization, members of a nonprofit public arts group Wednesday turned down city funding for a controversial mural of the Black Panthers. "With great pain, I say, 'We give up,' " said Judy Baca, founder of the Social and Public Arts Resource Center, which annually produces a slate of city-sponsored public art projects.
BOOKS
July 3, 1994 | Leon Forrest, Leon Forrest is chair of African-American Studies at Northwestern University. His latest works are "Divine Days," a novel, and a collection of essays entitled "Relocations of the Spirit."
An African American man draped out in Black Panther regalia, seated upon a wicker chair, with a spear in one hand, and an animal pelt upon the floor: this is the classic, flamboyant, self-assured image by which most of us remember Black Panther leader Huey Newton. But in Hugh Pearson's keenly observed, often brilliant, Panther-busting book, "The Shadow of the Panther," the party founder gets stripped bare of his accouterments.
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