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Huey P Long

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NEWS
October 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The tomb of the man labeled by history as Huey P. Long's assassin was opened in Baton Rouge as a forensics sleuth hoped to settle questions about the death of the Louisiana political legend. Workers carefully scraped away 19 inches of hard dirt on top of the vault of Dr. Carl Austin Weiss, who died in a hail of bullets along with Long in 1935. If historic accounts are correct, Weiss shot the "Kingfish" as he strolled down a state Capitol corridor, then was killed by Long's bodyguards.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2003 | Cain Burdeau, Associated Press
Huey P. Long: icon or the closest this country came to having a dictator? Louisiana state historians will renew this debate on Long, "The Kingfish," in a new museum. The fiery governor and U.S. senator will be featured alongside Louis Armstrong in a permanent exhibit called "Huey and Louis: Two Louisiana Icons" at the Louisiana State Museum's Baton Rouge museum, to open in early 2005. Armstrong was an easy pick. His influence on the world of music is unquestioned. But mixing Louis with Huey?
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NEWS
June 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
Louisiana state police have concluded that the doctor who was always blamed for the 1935 assassination of Sen. Huey P. Long was indeed the gunman that day, an officer said Friday. State Police Lt. Donald R. Moreau testified Friday that Long, the legendary "Kingfish" of Louisiana politics, was killed by a single shot fired at close range. 'He was shot once, the bullet passing completely through his body and exiting through his back," Moreau testified at a hearing on the case.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | Associated Press
The gun some people believe was used to kill Huey Long was turned over Wednesday to the Louisiana State Police, which lost possession of it more than half a century ago. For the last three years, the Browning 7.65-millimeter automatic has been the subject of a court fight over its ownership. Most historians believe that Dr. Carl A. Weiss pulled the gun and shot Long in the state Capitol on Sept. 8, 1935. Long's bodyguards killed Weiss.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | Associated Press
Authorities on Friday closed their investigation of Sen. Huey P. Long's killing after reaching the same conclusion as almost 57 years ago: that Louisiana's political "Kingfish" was slain by a doctor out to right a family wrong. "He was shot once, the bullet passing completely through his body and exiting through his back," state police Lt. Donald R. Moreau testified at a hearing. "There was one assassin. That assassin was Dr. Carl A. Weiss." Long, a U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2003 | Cain Burdeau, Associated Press
Huey P. Long: icon or the closest this country came to having a dictator? Louisiana state historians will renew this debate on Long, "The Kingfish," in a new museum. The fiery governor and U.S. senator will be featured alongside Louis Armstrong in a permanent exhibit called "Huey and Louis: Two Louisiana Icons" at the Louisiana State Museum's Baton Rouge museum, to open in early 2005. Armstrong was an easy pick. His influence on the world of music is unquestioned. But mixing Louis with Huey?
NEWS
April 5, 1993 | GARRY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the merchants and the poor hill farmers around this economically depressed town of 7,200, the spirit of Huey P. Long, the local boy who rose to become a lightning rod of social protest in the 1930s, has returned, offering salvation. "Almost everyone in town is pulling together on this," said George Wyatt, the executive director of Winnfield's Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
September 23, 1992 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Huey P. Long was the most accomplished, loved, hated, feared and fearsome populist politician of the American century. Who would argue with that? A caravan of commas is required just to begin to take his measure. Ruthless, brilliant, inspiring, reckless and more, his "Share the Wealth" society and his slogan "Every man a King!" electrified the poor and panicked the prosperous. Here in this green, pine-swamp town, Long was born 99 years ago.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | Associated Press
The gun some people believe was used to kill Huey Long was turned over Wednesday to the Louisiana State Police, which lost possession of it more than half a century ago. For the last three years, the Browning 7.65-millimeter automatic has been the subject of a court fight over its ownership. Most historians believe that Dr. Carl A. Weiss pulled the gun and shot Long in the state Capitol on Sept. 8, 1935. Long's bodyguards killed Weiss.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | Associated Press
A crane on a barge struck the Huey P. Long Bridge on Wednesday, dislodging a concrete section and forcing a 12-hour halt to Mississippi River traffic and rail and automobile traffic over the span, authorities said. No injuries were reported.
NEWS
April 5, 1993 | GARRY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the merchants and the poor hill farmers around this economically depressed town of 7,200, the spirit of Huey P. Long, the local boy who rose to become a lightning rod of social protest in the 1930s, has returned, offering salvation. "Almost everyone in town is pulling together on this," said George Wyatt, the executive director of Winnfield's Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
September 23, 1992 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Huey P. Long was the most accomplished, loved, hated, feared and fearsome populist politician of the American century. Who would argue with that? A caravan of commas is required just to begin to take his measure. Ruthless, brilliant, inspiring, reckless and more, his "Share the Wealth" society and his slogan "Every man a King!" electrified the poor and panicked the prosperous. Here in this green, pine-swamp town, Long was born 99 years ago.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
Louisiana state police have concluded that the doctor who was always blamed for the 1935 assassination of Sen. Huey P. Long was indeed the gunman that day, an officer said Friday. State Police Lt. Donald R. Moreau testified Friday that Long, the legendary "Kingfish" of Louisiana politics, was killed by a single shot fired at close range. 'He was shot once, the bullet passing completely through his body and exiting through his back," Moreau testified at a hearing on the case.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | Associated Press
Authorities on Friday closed their investigation of Sen. Huey P. Long's killing after reaching the same conclusion as almost 57 years ago: that Louisiana's political "Kingfish" was slain by a doctor out to right a family wrong. "He was shot once, the bullet passing completely through his body and exiting through his back," state police Lt. Donald R. Moreau testified at a hearing. "There was one assassin. That assassin was Dr. Carl A. Weiss." Long, a U.S.
NEWS
October 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The tomb of the man labeled by history as Huey P. Long's assassin was opened in Baton Rouge as a forensics sleuth hoped to settle questions about the death of the Louisiana political legend. Workers carefully scraped away 19 inches of hard dirt on top of the vault of Dr. Carl Austin Weiss, who died in a hail of bullets along with Long in 1935. If historic accounts are correct, Weiss shot the "Kingfish" as he strolled down a state Capitol corridor, then was killed by Long's bodyguards.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1995 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Picture a Populist Democratic leader who cheats, lies, panders, philanders, plots thuggery, steals from the rich to give to the poor, champions minorities for his own cynical ends, and makes a fortune preaching something close to socialism. OK, now picture one who's not even a figment of Rush Limbaugh's imagination. John Goodman is such a juicy choice to play '20s/'30s politico Huey P.
NEWS
February 26, 1985 | Associated Press
Sen. Russell B. Long (D-La.), the ranking Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee, announced unexpectedly Monday that he will retire at the end of his current term in January, 1987. Long, 66, speaking to reporters at a news conference in his Senate office, said: "At some point, I think the good Lord permits you to live a long life, and, if the people are good to you, a senator ought to consider at what point he ought to retire. "And that's my decision," Long said.
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