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NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Electrons work for free, except, of course in major storms -- as several prominent websites discovered. When the former Hurricane Sandy -- now technically a cyclone -- hit the New York area, it cut power to hundreds of thousands of people, including some major Internet providers. Many seeking news, gossip and other information found themselves temporarily bereft and relying on other technologies such as television and radio and newspaper websites. PHOTOS: Sandy's huge impact Lost sites beginning Wednesday night included the Huffington Post, Gawker and the blog Mediaite.
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NATIONAL
September 9, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Talk about tag-sale treasure. About a year and a half ago, a Shenandoah Valley, Va., woman bought a $7 box lot at a flea market. The box included a small oil painting, a Paul Bunyan doll and a plastic cow.  The woman told the Huffington Post she wasn't really interested in the  5.5-by-9-inch  painting with a frame bearing the name RENOIR. No, she wanted the doll and the toy cow. (She has requested anonymity, but gave her name to the Huffington Post as “Renoir Girl.”)
BUSINESS
August 27, 2012 | Bloomberg News
AOL Inc. announced a $600-million accelerated stock buyback agreement and a special cash dividend of $5.15 a share, the final steps in returning about $1.1 billion to shareholders. The Internet company said Monday that it will purchase $600 million worth of common stock under an agreement with Barclays. The one-time dividend will be payable Dec. 14. This month AOL, owner of the Huffington Post and TechCrunch websites, rose to its highest value since it was spun off by Time Warner Inc. in 2009, after an increase in advertising revenue and a one-time gain on a patent sale helped the company return to a profit in the second quarter.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
“Arrested Development” fans, the wait is (almost) over: The cult favorite will make its highly anticipated return next spring with at least 10 episodes - possibly more. The news, first reported by the Huffington Post , was confirmed by a Netflix spokesperson. Rumors of an “Arrested Development” revival have surfaced repeatedly ever since the critically beloved but but ratings-challenged sitcom was canceled by Fox in 2006. Last year, Mitchell Hurwitz and the entire cast reunited for the first time at the New Yorker Festival, and announced plans for a new, limited-run season and a possible movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2012 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
Andrew Breitbart loathed the "institutional left," and what he called "the Democrat media complex. " A son of Brentwood who cut his sharp online incisors working alongside blogging pioneers Matt Drudge and Arianna Huffington, Breitbart went on to forge an eponymous website and persona as one of the fiercest voices of the right. His mission appeared cut short March 1, when he died of heart failure. Breitbart was just 43. But an unlikely crew of friends and associates - his oldest childhood friend, a pair of Harvard-educated lawyers, a financier/filmmaker who served in the Navy and a musician pal who reinforces the fallen leader's voice as the website's "minister of culture" - scarcely paused after the loss.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Were you among the millions of people who gasped in horror -- and maybe a little glee -- at the story of the scorned dentist who yanked out her ex-lover's teeth in revenge? Turns out the story appears to be a hoax. And among those who fell for it? Yours truly, and the Los Angeles Times. On May 1, I wrote how the story of a vengeful dentist in Poland named Anna Mackowiak was richocheting around the Internet and setting social media channels on fire. On Facebook alone, it was shared thousands upon thousands of times.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2012 | By James Rainey and Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK — The Pulitzer Prizes for journalism awarded here Monday demonstrated the resilience of old media and the ascendance of the new, as the venerable Philadelphia Inquirer won the prestigious public service medal and the 7-year-old Huffington Post took the national reporting prize for its exploration of the challenges that confront wounded U.S. service members. Digital-focused media first leaped into the Pulitzer winner's circle last year when ProPublica won the national reporting prize.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
It seemed too delicious. Too exciting. Too good to be true. And that's because it was. Tacocopter, a faux Silicon Valley start-up, threw the Internet for a loop these last few days with a website that promised the delivery of tacos via unmanned drone helicopters that accepted orders from a smartphone app. That combination of the excitement of Terminator films with the flavor of the cherished Mexican meal and the efficiency of the...
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli and Robin Abcarian
Andrew Breitbart, already an increasingly prominent player in the political and media influence game, never had a moment quite like the one on June 6, 2011. One of his websites, BigGovernment.com, had caused a sensation when it posted lewd photos of a man that appeared to be U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner , a firebrand liberal congressman from New York. Breitbart's move came after a suggestive photo of Weiner had been posted on the Democrat's Twitter account, which the congressman repeatedly said was the work of hackers, though he had not offered any evidence.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Should Facebook users get a taste of the company's initial public offering? More than a few say yes. The reasoning here is that because Facebook's more than 800 million users make the site what it is -- and provide all that personal data that allows Facebook to prosper -- they're entitled to participate in what's sure to be a very lucrative IPO. Dream on. We heard pretty much the same when AOL purchased Huffington Post for more...
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