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Hugh Cherry

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1993
I want to thank Robert Hilburn for the excellent review he gave the new retrospective collection of Lefty Frizell's performances ("Hail to the Real King," May 9). I was pleased that Charles K. Wolfe asked for my recollections for his superb album biography of Lefty. I met Lefty when his manager, Jim Beck, brought him to Nashville with his first release in 1950. Lefty's appearance on my radio program was his first interview, and I remember it vividly. Lefty was a very shy man, and without his social lubricant, alcohol, he simply froze.
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NEWS
November 30, 1990 | RICHARD BEENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The picture is moving in its simplicity: a snapshot of a father and son that in another time, in happier circumstances, might have been lost in the stacks of photos that chronicle one family's life. But to Hugh Cherry, it is a cherished reminder of the past, and of a son who laughed and cried and left an indelible mark of happiness and hope on all who knew him.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1988 | MIKE BOEHM
Hugh Cherry got to see Hank Williams' lighter side as well as his demons. Once, after a visit to California, Williams showed up newly garbed by Nudie, the Western clothier. "He had on a pair of boots that were the ugliest I ever saw," Cherry says. "All I could say about them boots was, 'They're fantastic, Hank.' " Not long afterward, Williams sent Cherry a gift: a pair of the same multicolored calfskin boots. Cherry tossed them in a drawer at his radio station. "I never did wear 'em.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1986 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Uncle Art Satherley, a pioneering record industry executive who helped launch the careers of major country music performers such as Gene Autry, Tex Ritter, Roy Rogers, Bob Wills and others, died Mondayat his Fountain Valley home of natural causes. He was 96. Satherley had been in poor health in recent years but he was "still in good spirits and joking with his wife, Harriet, on Sunday," longtime friend Forrest White said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1988 | MIKE BOEHM
While Hank Williams acted out his American tragedy, Hugh Cherry stood by like a member of an ancient Greek chorus, joining the action in some scenes but mainly watching and bearing witness to one of the most significant, endlessly resonant rises and falls in popular music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
The City Council has rejected a plan to build an oil-change shop and carwash next to the historic redwood water tower, placing the future of the often-discussed vacant lot in question. Council members said the project would only worsen the area's serious traffic problems. They also expressed hope that a "more appropriate" use for the land that would satisfy both residents and the developer could be found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1986 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Uncle Art Satherley, a pioneering record industry executive who helped launch the careers of such major country music performers as Gene Autry, Tex Ritter, Roy Rogers, Bob Wills and others, died Monday at his Fountain Valley home. He was 96. Satherley had been in poor health in recent years, but he was "still in good spirits and joking with his wife Harriet on Sunday," longtime friend Forrest White said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1986 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Who would have thought that Los Angeles rock clubs would be the launching pad for a country music revolution? But that's just what many observers feel is happening in the wake of the dramatic mainstream country acceptance of L.A.-based maverick Dwight Yoakam. Rejected by the Nashville kingmakers, the 29-year-old Kentucky native found a home in the L.A. rock clubs last year and used that unlikely base to establish his country credibility. Now Yoakam is a bona fide country star.
SPORTS
August 20, 1997 | EARL GUSTKEY
Val Ackerman, the seemingly unflappable president of the WNBA, may soon have her first major headache--keeping her league's best player in the league. It's a money-rooted problem, not surprisingly. Cynthia Cooper of the Houston Comets, who is about to be named the league's most valuable player, makes the $50,000 WNBA "maximum" salary. With incentives, she could earn $100,000 this season.
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