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BUSINESS
November 7, 1990
Hughes Aircraft Co., Los Angeles, received a $295,596 Air Force contract to provide services and supply indirect materials necessary for repair.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
Allen E. Puckett, one of the engineers who after World War II built Los Angeles-based Hughes Aircraft Co. into the nation's leading defense electronics firm - dominant in the markets for air defense, radar systems, tactical missiles and satellites - has died. He was 94. One of the nation's top technologists and defense executives during the Cold War, Puckett died March 31 at his home in Pacific Palisades after suffering a stroke. His wife, Marilyn, confirmed his death. "Allen Puckett was one of the guiding spirits of Hughes Aircraft," said Malcolm Currie, a former deputy defense secretary who later followed in Puckett's footsteps as another president of the company.
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BUSINESS
October 15, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
It's best known as the place where Howard Hughes built the massive Spruce Goose. But the old Hughes Aircraft Co. plant in Playa Vista played a far greater role as a foundry for some of the nation's more important weapon systems. The 1,300-acre site was dubbed a national resource by the federal government because it developed technologically advanced weapons projects that the Pentagon believed no other defense contractors were capable of tackling. During the Cold War, the former Soviet Union even considered it one of the first targets of its nuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missiles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2012
Ron Taylor Filmed shark for 'Jaws' Ron Taylor, 78, an Australian marine conservationist who helped film some of the dramatic underwater footage used in the classic shark thriller "Jaws," died Sunday at a Sydney hospital after battling leukemia. Taylor and his wife, Valerie, spent years filming great white sharks and trying to persuade a wary public that the much-feared creatures were beautiful animals worthy of respect. Their stunning up-close images of sharks drew the attention of "Jaws" director Steven Spielberg, who asked the couple to capture footage of a great white for his 1975 blockbuster.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1985 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Here are financial details of General Motors' winning bid for Hughes Aircraft: GM will pay $2.7 billion in cash and about $2.5 billion in a new issue of stock, to be called class H. That stock is similar to that issued by GM last year when it acquired Electronic Data Systems. Terms call for GM to issue 70 million class H shares, of which the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the aircraft company's sole owner, will receive 50 million.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1994
I just finished reading a letter to you from a retired Hughes Aircraft Co. employee about the "Discrimination Award and Hughes' Culture" (Nov. 13). Let me quote a portion of it: "Hughes Aircraft Company was founded by that great engineer but alleged racist Howard Hughes. As a result, its culture has long been typified by a 'closed elite family' personality. Family membership is reserved for white males who are mostly overly impressed with their intellect and arrogant in their deference to equal opportunity.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1994
Donald A. Nelson has been appointed president of Hughes Identification Devices Inc. in Tustin, part of Hughes Aircraft Co. Nelson joins the company from IBM Corp., where he held sales, marketing management, and hardware and software business management positions. For the past eight years, Nelson has managed the IBM Engineering Systems CADCAM software and strategic third-party alliances.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1988
Richard F. Alden, Hughes Aircraft vice chairman and general counsel, has retired. A Hughes internal announcement indicated that Alden "elected to retire under the provisions of the Hughes retirement plan." The announcement quoted Hughes Chairman Albert Wheelon as saying that "a successor will be named soon." Michael Smith, chief financial officer, will take over Alden's duties until a successor is named, the internal management announcement said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1989
Air quality regulators have accused Hughes Aircraft of releasing excessive amounts of solvents and thinners into the atmosphere from a manufacturing plant in El Segundo. In a lawsuit filed in Torrance Superior Court, the South Coast Air Quality Management District asks for penalties of up to $25,000 a day for violations of district rules over an eight-month period from July 6, 1987, to March 4, 1988.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1996 | BARBARA MURPHY
Franklin Telecom of Westlake Village has received a substantial order from Hughes Aircraft for its ICP186 Multi Processor Computer System, company officials said. Franklin has been selling this product to Hughes and other customers requiring co-processor systems for eight years. There have been no recent orders from Hughes, however, because for a time the aircraft manufacturer had more of the computers than it needed, a Franklin official said.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Roger Vincent
After decades of silence and neglect, the renovated former office of aviation mogul Howard Hughes in Playa Vista will finally have a new occupant - design and advertising agency 72andSunny. The company has agreed to rent 58,000 square feet in two buildings that were once part of Hughes Aircraft Co. headquarters. The space includes the "Mahogany Row" offices that were home to top executives, including the brilliant but mercurial inventor and airman. Who will get the corner suite that Hughes himself once occupied?
BUSINESS
February 24, 2012 | By Roger Vincent and Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Move over, Spruce Goose. Here comes YouTube. Internet video site YouTube and marketing agency Earthbound Media Group have agreed to be the first tenants at the Hercules Campus, an office park being created by Los Angeles developer Wayne Ratkovich from buildings in Playa Vista that were once the hub of aerospace giant Hughes Aircraft Co. YouTube will take over a 41,000-square-foot warehouse and office. Earthbound Media will move its headquarters from Orange County to a 15,000-square-foot building where technicians assembled the cockpit for the legendary Hughes H-4 Hercules seaplane, commonly known as the Spruce Goose.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2011 | By Peter Pae, Los Angeles Times
For the generation that grew up during the Cold War, Hughes was synonymous with aerospace, an industry that flourished and dotted Southern California's landscape. At its height in the mid-1980s, Hughes Aircraft Co., like the industry, was ubiquitous, from Newport Beach to Santa Barbara with sprawling facilities in Culver City, El Segundo and Canoga Park. More than 85,000 worked for the company developing the nation's most advanced military electronics. Despite its ever-presence in the region, not much has been written about the aerospace giant other than as a sideshow to its eccentric founder Howard Hughes.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
It's best known as the place where Howard Hughes built the massive Spruce Goose. But the old Hughes Aircraft Co. plant in Playa Vista played a far greater role as a foundry for some of the nation's more important weapon systems. The 1,300-acre site was dubbed a national resource by the federal government because it developed technologically advanced weapons projects that the Pentagon believed no other defense contractors were capable of tackling. During the Cold War, the former Soviet Union even considered it one of the first targets of its nuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missiles.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2010 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
The decaying former headquarters of aviation giant Howard Hughes will be turned into an office campus for creative tenants as part of a $50-million makeover of the famous operation at Playa Vista. The complex includes the enormous hangar where Hughes built his infamous Spruce Goose airplane but is now used mostly as a sound stage for movie and television production. The seven-story structure will be upgraded to contain five sound stages that could be used simultaneously, new owner Wayne Ratkovich said.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Southern California's unmanned aircraft legacy shares deep roots with another of the region's economic mainstays — Hollywood. One of the first pioneers to bridge the two worlds was Reginald Denny, a British actor during the silent era who starred as a swashbuckling leading man in steamy romantic films such as "The Price of Possession" and "Tropical Love. " A former World War I fighter pilot, Denny kept his passion for flight alive by running a model plane shop on Hollywood Boulevard in the 1930s, where he sold radio-controlled aircraft.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1985
A spokesman for the company said that both professional and clerical staff at the company's ground systems group in Fullerton were given notice in recent weeks and that more layoffs may be forthcoming. The ground systems group employs 14,500 people. Officials at Hughes' El Segundo headquarters called the move prudent management and denied that it had anything to do with the impending acquisition by General Motors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2009 | By Martha Groves
The Los Angeles Planning Commission voted Thursday to approve the final phase of the massive Playa Vista development between the Westchester bluffs and Marina del Rey. In casting his "yes" vote, commission President William Roschen praised Playa Vista as a "smart, sustainable project." The 111-acre second phase -- which Roschen called the project's "centerpiece" -- is intended to complete the vision of Playa Vista as a live-work-play community and will be built between the existing mixed-use residential community to the west, home to more than 6,000 residents, and the office campus to the east.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2009 | By Dennis McLellan
Vytautas Cekanauskas, a former Hughes Aircraft electrical engineer who served as honorary consul general of Lithuania in Los Angeles for more than 30 years, has died. He was 80. Cekanauskas died of cancer Nov. 30 at Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, said his daughter, Vida Bruozis. The Lithuanian-born Cekanauskas was appointed by the chief of the Lithuanian Diplomatic Service in 1977 and served in the uncompensated position until his death. In 1990, during his tenure, the Baltic republic's legislature declared its independence from the Soviet Union.
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