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Hughes Helicopters

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BUSINESS
March 8, 1985
A corporate headquarters move and expansion of assembly facilities will boost the firm's employment in Arizona to 7,000 from 2,000 in five years, Hughes President Jack G. Real said. He made the comments at ground-breaking ceremonies for a 1.3-million-square-foot addition of office, lab and assembly facilities in Mesa, Ariz. Hughes Helicopters, which dedicated the existing facility in 1982, now builds AH-4A Apache attack helicopters in Mesa.
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BUSINESS
May 5, 2002
"A Weapon That Will Turn Heads" [April 6] claimed that much of the development of this system was done by Rockwell Collins and an Israeli firm. Shortly after 1970, Lockheed developed a system that was put on the Cheyenne helicopter. A Gatling-type gun was mounted under the pilot and would turn in whatever direction the pilot's head turned. The gun was controlled by the helmet the pilot wore. He could aim and fire at whatever he looked at without moving the helicopter. All of the design effort and tooling developed by Lockheed went into the Apache, manufactured by Hughes Helicopters, after the Army canceled the Cheyenne contract.
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BUSINESS
August 28, 1985 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
A major reminder of Howard Hughes' legacy has faded away: Hughes Helicopters Inc., which the late billionaire founded in 1934, has been renamed McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Co. The name change was announced Tuesday, nearly 20 months after McDonnell Douglas acquired Culver City-based Hughes. It was motivated in part by confusion over the name, McDonnell Douglas spokesman Jack Cooke said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1997
The idea that lower defense budgets require the merging of large defense companies is at odds with the global change underway in management. This change has shown that a team of separate (smaller) companies can produce a better product at less cost in shorter time. Commercial companies are dedicated to this process for leadership in world markets. It is well known that engineers are most inventive when pressed into a corner, and so are engi- neering-based defense companies. Size reduction of companies, like government, is healthy--an opportunity for reinvention to serve the customer better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1997
The idea that lower defense budgets require the merging of large defense companies is at odds with the global change underway in management. This change has shown that a team of separate (smaller) companies can produce a better product at less cost in shorter time. Commercial companies are dedicated to this process for leadership in world markets. It is well known that engineers are most inventive when pressed into a corner, and so are engi- neering-based defense companies. Size reduction of companies, like government, is healthy--an opportunity for reinvention to serve the customer better.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2002
"A Weapon That Will Turn Heads" [April 6] claimed that much of the development of this system was done by Rockwell Collins and an Israeli firm. Shortly after 1970, Lockheed developed a system that was put on the Cheyenne helicopter. A Gatling-type gun was mounted under the pilot and would turn in whatever direction the pilot's head turned. The gun was controlled by the helmet the pilot wore. He could aim and fire at whatever he looked at without moving the helicopter. All of the design effort and tooling developed by Lockheed went into the Apache, manufactured by Hughes Helicopters, after the Army canceled the Cheyenne contract.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1987 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department said Wednesday that it will join forces with a whistle-blower who has sued McDonnell Douglas in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, alleging that the aerospace firm's helicopter unit overcharged the Army by at least $1.1 million on defense contracts. The suit was filed in March but was sealed until Wednesday under provisions of the federal False Claims Act, which permits individuals to sue a defense contractor on behalf of the government. U.S. Atty.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
A new attack helicopter, intended to usher the Army into high-technology aviation, has broken down so often that one commander has told his superiors he would rather fly a 1960s-vintage chopper "if we went to war tomorrow." In a recent Army gunnery exercise, all 12 of the new high-technology helicopters, the AH-64 Apache, became incapacitated at least once within five days, according to a scathing internal Army memorandum written last month and released today.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Pentagon contracts officer has withdrawn a $360-million whistle-blower lawsuit accusing Hughes Aircraft Co. of inflating labor costs by $70 million on certain defense contracts, Hughes said Friday. Patrick M. Kelley, a former chief of the contracts division for the Defense Contract Administration Service at Hughes Ground Systems Group in Fullerton, filed a motion in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles to drop his lawsuit on April 27.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1987 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
It was the kind of buy that Mark White was looking for--a big second-hand desk at a bargain price. Because its drawers were locked shut, the man at the Monrovia office supply store was offering it for just $39.95. White, an advertising executive, trucked the desk to his San Dimas office and pried open the top drawer with a screwdriver. "One little click and the whole thing popped open," he said, showing a drawer full of pencils and paper clips. "I said, 'Hey, I scored!'
BUSINESS
May 5, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Pentagon contracts officer has withdrawn a $360-million whistle-blower lawsuit accusing Hughes Aircraft Co. of inflating labor costs by $70 million on certain defense contracts, Hughes said Friday. Patrick M. Kelley, a former chief of the contracts division for the Defense Contract Administration Service at Hughes Ground Systems Group in Fullerton, filed a motion in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles to drop his lawsuit on April 27.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
A new attack helicopter, intended to usher the Army into high-technology aviation, has broken down so often that one commander has told his superiors he would rather fly a 1960s-vintage chopper "if we went to war tomorrow." In a recent Army gunnery exercise, all 12 of the new high-technology helicopters, the AH-64 Apache, became incapacitated at least once within five days, according to a scathing internal Army memorandum written last month and released today.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1988 | United Press International
The Justice Department said Friday that it was withdrawing from involvement in a false claims suit in which a former employee of Hughes Helicopter Co. charged that the firm engaged in fraudulent pricing on parts for the Army's Apache helicopter. Department lawyers notified a federal judge in Los Angeles Thursday that, while a government audit of thousands of documents confirmed certain facts in the complaint, the inquiry did not produce enough evidence to demonstrate damage to the government.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1987 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department said Wednesday that it will join forces with a whistle-blower who has sued McDonnell Douglas in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, alleging that the aerospace firm's helicopter unit overcharged the Army by at least $1.1 million on defense contracts. The suit was filed in March but was sealed until Wednesday under provisions of the federal False Claims Act, which permits individuals to sue a defense contractor on behalf of the government. U.S. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1987 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
It was the kind of buy that Mark White was looking for--a big second-hand desk at a bargain price. Because its drawers were locked shut, the man at the Monrovia office supply store was offering it for just $39.95. White, an advertising executive, trucked the desk to his San Dimas office and pried open the top drawer with a screwdriver. "One little click and the whole thing popped open," he said, showing a drawer full of pencils and paper clips. "I said, 'Hey, I scored!'
BUSINESS
August 28, 1985 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
A major reminder of Howard Hughes' legacy has faded away: Hughes Helicopters Inc., which the late billionaire founded in 1934, has been renamed McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Co. The name change was announced Tuesday, nearly 20 months after McDonnell Douglas acquired Culver City-based Hughes. It was motivated in part by confusion over the name, McDonnell Douglas spokesman Jack Cooke said.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1988 | United Press International
The Justice Department said Friday that it was withdrawing from involvement in a false claims suit in which a former employee of Hughes Helicopter Co. charged that the firm engaged in fraudulent pricing on parts for the Army's Apache helicopter. Department lawyers notified a federal judge in Los Angeles Thursday that, while a government audit of thousands of documents confirmed certain facts in the complaint, the inquiry did not produce enough evidence to demonstrate damage to the government.
NEWS
May 26, 1985 | From Associated Press
Hughes Helicopter Inc., a part of the empire built by the late Howard R. Hughes that was sold to the nation's largest defense contractor in 1984, has become the subject of an investigation involving "serious charges of accounting irregularities," Army Secretary John O. Marsh Jr. disclosed Friday. The company, which is currently holding roughly $4 billion in Army contracts, had its monthly payments for overhead expenses cut off completely earlier this month, Marsh said.
NEWS
May 26, 1985 | From Associated Press
Hughes Helicopter Inc., a part of the empire built by the late Howard R. Hughes that was sold to the nation's largest defense contractor in 1984, has become the subject of an investigation involving "serious charges of accounting irregularities," Army Secretary John O. Marsh Jr. disclosed Friday. The company, which is currently holding roughly $4 billion in Army contracts, had its monthly payments for overhead expenses cut off completely earlier this month, Marsh said.
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