Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHughie
IN THE NEWS

Hughie

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Los Angeles Festival has maintained that because of violence in Tian An Men Square no artists from China would be brought in for the Pacific-themed festival, the Open Festival, which will run simultaneously, is planning to bring in actors from Shanghai to perform a Chinese version of Eugene O'Neill's one-act play "Hughie."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hughie Thomasson, 55, a singer, guitarist and founding member of the popular Southern rock band the Outlaws, died Sunday of an apparent heart attack at his home in Brooksville, Fla., the band announced. Thomasson, an architect of the sound that produced the 1970s rock anthems "There Goes Another Love Song" and "Green Grass and High Tides," was a teenager when he joined the Tampa, Fla.-based band in the late 1960s.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1987
Burglars who used a cutting torch Tuesday to break into a Northridge bank vault fled empty-handed when they were interrupted by the bank's security guard, police said. The intruders broke in through the back door of the Investment Savings Bank in the 8300 block of Reseda Boulevard about 2:55 a.m. after disabling the bank's alarm system, said Lt. Howard Hughie, head of the Los Angeles Police Department's burglary and theft division.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1999
In Amy Wallace's otherwise fine article about Al Pacino ("The Place He Likes to Be," June 27), there was some misinformation. The role of Erie in Eugene O'Neill's "Hughie" was first performed in English not by Jason Robards but by Burgess Meredith in the 1963 Bath Theatre Festival production, reprised that same year in London. The night clerk was played by Jack MacGowran, who spoke his occasional lines as written, unlike the Robards and Ben Gazzara productions, where the clerk remained mute.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During one song in the new Lloyd J. Schwartz-Ben Lanzarone musical, "You & Me," Hughie (Gary Imhoff), a go-getter entrepreneur-turned-mayor, complains about "middle-aged spread." Though it isn't visibly affecting Hughie, middle-aged spread is all over "You & Me." Director-choreographer Randy Brenner's production at the Ventura Court Theatre follows the musical's lead throughout; thus, when things are peppy and spry early on, the energy level suggests that we're in for a lively show about two lifelong friends, Hughie and Russell (Dan Sachoff)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1986 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
As a scam, it had worked pretty well, netting thieves several million dollars' worth of jewelry over the last five years or so. But this time, Los Angeles police used a scam of their own, and that worked pretty well too, netting the officers nine suspects and serving notice that lawmen are out to break up the sophisticated gang of more than 100 Latin American nationals that has been operating in the downtown area for more than a decade. Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1988
Both pride and ego go with the office of governor of California. After World War II, when our state began its rise to the most populous in the nation, four governors--Earl Warren, Goodwin Knight, Edmund (Pat) Brown and Ronald Reagan--privately but seldom publicly gave credit to the person who, more than any other, moved their programs into laws. He was Hugh Burns, longtime state Senate president pro tem and chairman of its Rules Committee. Had he lived in Elizabethan times, Burns could well have served in Parliament.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
What fun can there be in going to plays night after night? Critics hear the question all the time, and have different answers. This corner's answer is simple: Seeing a playwright come up with a better play than his last one. That's one reason why Gary Jacobelly's raucous "Catch" at Al's Bar is fun (it's also serious, but more on that in a moment). Jacobelly is clearly getting his voice together. His last play, also at Al's, was a dreadful bit of word spew called "The Skin Man."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN
Eugene O'Neill's massive "The Iceman Cometh" opens Wednesday at the Doolittle Theatre, staged by Jose Quintero and starring Jason Robards. Robards and Quintero first did the play in 1956 at Off-Broadway's Circle-in-the-Square Theatre, a revival that established Robards as an importantactor and re-established O'Neill as a living presence in the American theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1999
In Amy Wallace's otherwise fine article about Al Pacino ("The Place He Likes to Be," June 27), there was some misinformation. The role of Erie in Eugene O'Neill's "Hughie" was first performed in English not by Jason Robards but by Burgess Meredith in the 1963 Bath Theatre Festival production, reprised that same year in London. The night clerk was played by Jack MacGowran, who spoke his occasional lines as written, unlike the Robards and Ben Gazzara productions, where the clerk remained mute.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The modest but distinct pleasure offered by "Hughie," Eugene O'Neill's 1942 one-act directed by and co-starring Al Pacino, has nothing to do with a big star busting out, scaling Mt. Everest, braving the Role of a Lifetime. It's not that sort of performance, or that kind of material. Making his Los Angeles stage debut at the Mark Taper Forum--about time, pal--Pacino works in a comfortable, affable, low-keyed range as "Erie" Smith, O'Neill's pipe-dreaming Broadway sport.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1996 | AILEEN JACOBSON, NEWSDAY
He lurches into the shadowy hotel lobby in a crumpled tan suit, a battered hat and fancy two-tone shoes that look like the souvenirs of flusher times. He spreads his legs wide, as though to brace himself against the buffeting of a world that is no longer as steady as he would hope. This is Al Pacino as Erie Smith, the grieving small-time gambler and Broadway hustler of Eugene O'Neill's brief, brilliant gem "Hughie."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During one song in the new Lloyd J. Schwartz-Ben Lanzarone musical, "You & Me," Hughie (Gary Imhoff), a go-getter entrepreneur-turned-mayor, complains about "middle-aged spread." Though it isn't visibly affecting Hughie, middle-aged spread is all over "You & Me." Director-choreographer Randy Brenner's production at the Ventura Court Theatre follows the musical's lead throughout; thus, when things are peppy and spry early on, the energy level suggests that we're in for a lively show about two lifelong friends, Hughie and Russell (Dan Sachoff)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1995 | Al Martinez
I asked a prostitute once why she did what she did and she looked me straight in the eye and said why do you do what you do? Her name was Ginger. She had an annoying habit of answering a question with a question, the way Jerry Brown did when he was running for President. I told her I was doing what I did because I couldn't think of anything else I wanted to do, and she said, "Me too, so what?"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
What fun can there be in going to plays night after night? Critics hear the question all the time, and have different answers. This corner's answer is simple: Seeing a playwright come up with a better play than his last one. That's one reason why Gary Jacobelly's raucous "Catch" at Al's Bar is fun (it's also serious, but more on that in a moment). Jacobelly is clearly getting his voice together. His last play, also at Al's, was a dreadful bit of word spew called "The Skin Man."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the Los Angeles Festival has maintained that because of violence in Tian An Men Square no artists from China would be brought in for the Pacific-themed festival, the Open Festival, which will run simultaneously, is planning to bring in actors from Shanghai to perform a Chinese version of Eugene O'Neill's one-act play "Hughie."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1995 | Al Martinez
I asked a prostitute once why she did what she did and she looked me straight in the eye and said why do you do what you do? Her name was Ginger. She had an annoying habit of answering a question with a question, the way Jerry Brown did when he was running for President. I told her I was doing what I did because I couldn't think of anything else I wanted to do, and she said, "Me too, so what?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1996 | AILEEN JACOBSON, NEWSDAY
He lurches into the shadowy hotel lobby in a crumpled tan suit, a battered hat and fancy two-tone shoes that look like the souvenirs of flusher times. He spreads his legs wide, as though to brace himself against the buffeting of a world that is no longer as steady as he would hope. This is Al Pacino as Erie Smith, the grieving small-time gambler and Broadway hustler of Eugene O'Neill's brief, brilliant gem "Hughie."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1988
Both pride and ego go with the office of governor of California. After World War II, when our state began its rise to the most populous in the nation, four governors--Earl Warren, Goodwin Knight, Edmund (Pat) Brown and Ronald Reagan--privately but seldom publicly gave credit to the person who, more than any other, moved their programs into laws. He was Hugh Burns, longtime state Senate president pro tem and chairman of its Rules Committee. Had he lived in Elizabethan times, Burns could well have served in Parliament.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1987
Burglars who used a cutting torch Tuesday to break into a Northridge bank vault fled empty-handed when they were interrupted by the bank's security guard, police said. The intruders broke in through the back door of the Investment Savings Bank in the 8300 block of Reseda Boulevard about 2:55 a.m. after disabling the bank's alarm system, said Lt. Howard Hughie, head of the Los Angeles Police Department's burglary and theft division.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|