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Hugo Banzer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2002 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hugo Banzer Suarez, the general who ruled Bolivia as an ironfisted dictator in the 1970s and returned from exile and ignominy a generation later to become the democratically elected president, died of a heart attack Sunday. He was 75. The two-time ruler died surrounded by his family in Santa Cruz, a tropical city in eastern Bolivia, hours after waking up in pain around midnight, said his doctor, Freddy Terrazas.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2002 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hugo Banzer Suarez, the general who ruled Bolivia as an ironfisted dictator in the 1970s and returned from exile and ignominy a generation later to become the democratically elected president, died of a heart attack Sunday. He was 75. The two-time ruler died surrounded by his family in Santa Cruz, a tropical city in eastern Bolivia, hours after waking up in pain around midnight, said his doctor, Freddy Terrazas.
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NEWS
August 6, 1985
Victor Paz Estenssoro, the old-guard leader of Bolivia's nationalist revolution, won election for the fourth time as president and will take office today. His main opponent, Hugo Banzer, a conservative former military president who topped Paz in last month's popular election, telephoned the new president to wish him well. Banzer also announced that he will lead a "loyal opposition."
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
President Hugo Banzer returned to Bolivia after spending more than a month in the United States for treatment of lung cancer. He will formally resign Monday, then return to the U.S. for more cancer treatment. Banzer, 75, checked in to Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington more than a month ago for treatment of lung cancer that has spread to his liver. Banzer smoked as many as 30 cigarettes a day, according to sources close to the president.
NEWS
August 5, 1985 | Associated Press
Victor Paz Estenssoro, the 77-year-old dean of Latin American statesmen, won his fourth presidential term in three decades today on a vote by the new Congress. Paz, a centrist, was elected over former military strongman Hugo Banzer by a 94-51 vote in the second round of balloting after an all-night session. But leftist congressmen who supported Paz said they would remain independent of the new government, depriving it of a working majority in Congress.
NEWS
August 7, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Former military dictator Hugo Banzer took office as the new president, promising at his swearing-in ceremony to deepen a 12-year-old free market drive but adding that the failings that have left seven out of 10 Bolivians living in poverty must be corrected. Banzer, 71, who ruled as dictator from 1971 to 1978, won the general election June 1 for the rightist Nationalist Democratic Action party but failed to get an absolute majority.
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
President Hugo Banzer returned to Bolivia after spending more than a month in the United States for treatment of lung cancer. He will formally resign Monday, then return to the U.S. for more cancer treatment. Banzer, 75, checked in to Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington more than a month ago for treatment of lung cancer that has spread to his liver. Banzer smoked as many as 30 cigarettes a day, according to sources close to the president.
NEWS
July 8, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Hugo Banzer has cancer in his lung and liver, the government's spokesman said Saturday, calling his condition grave but saying Banzer hadn't yet decided whether to resign as leader of South America's poorest nation. The 75-year-old Banzer, who was democratically elected president four years ago and served as dictator from 1971 to 1978, is undergoing treatment at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington.
NEWS
June 3, 1997 | Times Wire Services
Former dictator Hugo Banzer, who campaigned on helping the poor, emerged Monday as the top vote-getter in Bolivia's presidential election. But Banzer, of the Nationalist Democratic Action party, needs to win a majority and faces a congressional vote to decide the race. Congress chooses between the top two vote-getters if no candidate wins a majority.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Democratic socialist Jaime Paz Zamora and former military dictator Hugo Banzer on Wednesday announced a surprising agreement of the left and the right that is expected to give Paz Zamora the Bolivian presidency this weekend. The agreement appeared to end protracted negotiations by political parties in preparation for a presidential run-off vote in Congress on Friday or Saturday.
NEWS
July 8, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Hugo Banzer has cancer in his lung and liver, the government's spokesman said Saturday, calling his condition grave but saying Banzer hadn't yet decided whether to resign as leader of South America's poorest nation. The 75-year-old Banzer, who was democratically elected president four years ago and served as dictator from 1971 to 1978, is undergoing treatment at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington.
NEWS
August 7, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Former military dictator Hugo Banzer took office as the new president, promising at his swearing-in ceremony to deepen a 12-year-old free market drive but adding that the failings that have left seven out of 10 Bolivians living in poverty must be corrected. Banzer, 71, who ruled as dictator from 1971 to 1978, won the general election June 1 for the rightist Nationalist Democratic Action party but failed to get an absolute majority.
NEWS
June 3, 1997 | Times Wire Services
Former dictator Hugo Banzer, who campaigned on helping the poor, emerged Monday as the top vote-getter in Bolivia's presidential election. But Banzer, of the Nationalist Democratic Action party, needs to win a majority and faces a congressional vote to decide the race. Congress chooses between the top two vote-getters if no candidate wins a majority.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Democratic socialist Jaime Paz Zamora and former military dictator Hugo Banzer on Wednesday announced a surprising agreement of the left and the right that is expected to give Paz Zamora the Bolivian presidency this weekend. The agreement appeared to end protracted negotiations by political parties in preparation for a presidential run-off vote in Congress on Friday or Saturday.
NEWS
May 9, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Both claiming victory, the parties of Bolivia's top two presidential candidates wrangled Monday over close election results that will force a runoff in Congress no matter who wins the popular vote. The dispute was part of a peaceful political process that appeared to certify democracy in this impoverished South American country, once known for its frequent military coups. The party of Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada, a millionaire businessman, said that its unofficial projections gave him 26.8% of Sunday's votes, 2.8% more than the ballots cast for retired Gen. Hugo Banzer, a former military dictator.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
From Andean highlands to tropical lowlands, Bolivians lined up at the polls Sunday for a presidential election that took South America's poorest country a step beyond its turbulent political past. The leading candidates were Hugo Banzer, 62, a retired general who ruled Bolivia for seven years after a military coup in 1971; Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada, 58, a former planning minister who helped tame runaway inflation in 1985 and 1986, and Jaime Paz Zamora, 50, a moderate leftist who served as vice president in the early 1980s.
NEWS
May 9, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Both claiming victory, the parties of Bolivia's top two presidential candidates wrangled Monday over close election results that will force a runoff in Congress no matter who wins the popular vote. The dispute was part of a peaceful political process that appeared to certify democracy in this impoverished South American country, once known for its frequent military coups. The party of Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada, a millionaire businessman, said that its unofficial projections gave him 26.8% of Sunday's votes, 2.8% more than the ballots cast for retired Gen. Hugo Banzer, a former military dictator.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
From Andean highlands to tropical lowlands, Bolivians lined up at the polls Sunday for a presidential election that took South America's poorest country a step beyond its turbulent political past. The leading candidates were Hugo Banzer, 62, a retired general who ruled Bolivia for seven years after a military coup in 1971; Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada, 58, a former planning minister who helped tame runaway inflation in 1985 and 1986, and Jaime Paz Zamora, 50, a moderate leftist who served as vice president in the early 1980s.
NEWS
August 6, 1985
Victor Paz Estenssoro, the old-guard leader of Bolivia's nationalist revolution, won election for the fourth time as president and will take office today. His main opponent, Hugo Banzer, a conservative former military president who topped Paz in last month's popular election, telephoned the new president to wish him well. Banzer also announced that he will lead a "loyal opposition."
NEWS
August 5, 1985 | Associated Press
Victor Paz Estenssoro, the 77-year-old dean of Latin American statesmen, won his fourth presidential term in three decades today on a vote by the new Congress. Paz, a centrist, was elected over former military strongman Hugo Banzer by a 94-51 vote in the second round of balloting after an all-night session. But leftist congressmen who supported Paz said they would remain independent of the new government, depriving it of a working majority in Congress.
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