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Hugo Martin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1998 | HUGO MARTIN
When I started reporting about 10 years ago, one of my first assignments was a story about a group of Torrance residents who were circulating a petition to ban soccer at a nearby public park. "Why soccer?" my editor asked. "Why not baseball or volleyball?" I found the answer in short time.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 24, 2005 | Hugo Martin
"FORWARD!" screams rafting guide Keith Stephens, his voice hoarse from barking orders over the roar of the white water. Stephens' crew, including four boisterous Russian tourists, responds to the urgent command by furiously paddling headlong into a Class IV rapid called Joe's Diner. Though the classification is easily explained -- Class IV means it's potentially hazardous for novices -- no one can account for the name.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1999 | HUGO MARTIN
The way the Rev. Robert Pipes remembers it, God told him long ago that the vehicle for reaching more lost souls was sitting right in his church parking lot in Watts. Pipes saw his 26-foot Open Road motor home and understood God's message: If the people won't come to church, take the church to them.
NEWS
March 29, 2005 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
CHRIS LONG steered his SUV past the tall pepper trees and horse corrals at Day Creek Ranch. He had come to investigate the report of a big cat -- possibly a lion or tiger -- roaming in the semirural outskirts of Simi Valley, and he was dubious. A patrol lieutenant and tracker with the state Department of Fish and Game, Long had seen many animals before and was most accustomed to cougar sightings, but anything larger seemed highly unlikely.
NEWS
July 22, 2000 | JOE MATHEWS and MANUEL GAMIZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Moving from bedroom to bedroom, an attacker slashed and stabbed five members of a much-admired Pico Rivera family early Friday, killing the father, two sons and a daughter and wounding the mother as they slept, authorities said. The floors of the Flores family's neatly kept yellow house in the 9600 block of Marjorie Street were streaked with blood when Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies arrived.
NEWS
March 29, 2005 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
CHRIS LONG steered his SUV past the tall pepper trees and horse corrals at Day Creek Ranch. He had come to investigate the report of a big cat -- possibly a lion or tiger -- roaming in the semirural outskirts of Simi Valley, and he was dubious. A patrol lieutenant and tracker with the state Department of Fish and Game, Long had seen many animals before and was most accustomed to cougar sightings, but anything larger seemed highly unlikely.
NEWS
May 24, 2005 | Hugo Martin
"FORWARD!" screams rafting guide Keith Stephens, his voice hoarse from barking orders over the roar of the white water. Stephens' crew, including four boisterous Russian tourists, responds to the urgent command by furiously paddling headlong into a Class IV rapid called Joe's Diner. Though the classification is easily explained -- Class IV means it's potentially hazardous for novices -- no one can account for the name.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2010 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
When the last Jungle Cruise boat docks for the night and lights fade to black on Sleeping Beauty's Castle, the real work begins. At lush Pixie Hollow, gardeners don miner's headlamps as they begin uprooting stubborn weeds. On Main Street, custodians scrape chewing gum off the sidewalk. And over at Mickey's Toontown, painters sand and recoat chipped handrails. Few see it happen, except perhaps for the dozens of feral cats that emerge from their hiding places to prowl the park after hours, stalking rodents.
HEALTH
December 29, 2008 | Hugo Martin
The hike is long and dusty, across two miles of shrub-strewn desert, south of Apple Valley. But Lisa Fernandez, a Web designer and hot springs enthusiast, has often made the trek from the trail head to the pools of steaming water. She believes the payoff is worth it: a day of soaking in undeveloped, natural hot springs in the shade of pine and willow trees at the foot of the San Bernardino Mountains.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2010 | By Hugo Martín
Theme parks are being flooded with applications from job seekers, as unemployed mortgage agents, sales clerks and construction workers who can't find work elsewhere seek temporary positions that often pay little more than minimum wage. A job fair at Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia last weekend drew 1,600 people -- in the rain. Universal Studios Hollywood took in more than 1,100 job applications on just one day last month. Disneyland in Anaheim and Knott's Berry Farm in Buena Park have received so many job applications that they put off plans to hold jobs fairs this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1999 | HUGO MARTIN
The way the Rev. Robert Pipes remembers it, God told him long ago that the vehicle for reaching more lost souls was sitting right in his church parking lot in Watts. Pipes saw his 26-foot Open Road motor home and understood God's message: If the people won't come to church, take the church to them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1998 | HUGO MARTIN
When I started reporting about 10 years ago, one of my first assignments was a story about a group of Torrance residents who were circulating a petition to ban soccer at a nearby public park. "Why soccer?" my editor asked. "Why not baseball or volleyball?" I found the answer in short time.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Workers at Disneyland and Disney California Adventure Park took photos of visitors entering the parks Tuesday as part of a new effort to crack down on abuse of multi-day tickets. The process of photographing guests--including children--delayed visitors getting into the park by about 45 minutes, according to park-goers. "They delayed literally thousands of people in line to do this process," said Bob Shoberg, a San Jose resident who visited Disneyland with his wife, daughters, in-laws and grandchildren.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
A low-cost city-to-city bus service that pulled out of Los Angeles four years ago because of low ridership is rolling back into L.A. in hopes of getting traction in its next outing. Megabus.com, a subsidiary of Paramus, N.J.-based Coach USA, plans to relaunch its Los Angles hub next month fromĀ  Union Station, with service to San Francisco, San Jose, Oakland and Las Vegas. The bus service will also add a second California hub in San Francisco. The bus line, which offers free onboard wireless Internet, power outlets and bathrooms, now serves 120 cities from eight hubs in North America, mostly on the East Coast, Northeast and several Southern states.
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