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Hugo Weaving

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2003 | Robert Abele
Perhaps nothing speaks so squarely to an actor's range than for a worldwide audience to embrace you as slitheringly evil in one blockbuster trilogy and magisterially wise and compassionate in another -- pretty much at the same time. This holiday season, 43-year-old Sydney-based actor Hugo Weaving can be seen concluding his characterizations of human-crushing virus Agent Smith in "The Matrix Revolutions" and elf king Elrond in "The Return of the King." But before the franchise train rolled into town, Weaving was handily impressing audiences Down Under, winning the first of two Australian Film Institute awards as a blind man opposite fellow countryman Russell Crowe in the drama "Proof," and first securing international recognition as a disco-loving drag queen in the hit comedy "The Adventures of Priscilla: Queen of the Desert."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2006 | Choire Sicha, Special to The Times
AT noon, Hugo Weaving slid into the worst table for two in the Odeon, next to the wet coats, and ordered himself a three-egg omelet. He sported a massive beard, close to but far fuller than Trotsky's, really more like Marx's, though not white or quite as bushy. With his jeans and short-sleeve T-shirt over long-sleeve shirt, he looked like a naughty hippie-surfer daddy. The beard also made his Agent Smith face invisible.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2006 | Choire Sicha, Special to The Times
AT noon, Hugo Weaving slid into the worst table for two in the Odeon, next to the wet coats, and ordered himself a three-egg omelet. He sported a massive beard, close to but far fuller than Trotsky's, really more like Marx's, though not white or quite as bushy. With his jeans and short-sleeve T-shirt over long-sleeve shirt, he looked like a naughty hippie-surfer daddy. The beard also made his Agent Smith face invisible.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2003 | Robert Abele
Perhaps nothing speaks so squarely to an actor's range than for a worldwide audience to embrace you as slitheringly evil in one blockbuster trilogy and magisterially wise and compassionate in another -- pretty much at the same time. This holiday season, 43-year-old Sydney-based actor Hugo Weaving can be seen concluding his characterizations of human-crushing virus Agent Smith in "The Matrix Revolutions" and elf king Elrond in "The Return of the King." But before the franchise train rolled into town, Weaving was handily impressing audiences Down Under, winning the first of two Australian Film Institute awards as a blind man opposite fellow countryman Russell Crowe in the drama "Proof," and first securing international recognition as a disco-loving drag queen in the hit comedy "The Adventures of Priscilla: Queen of the Desert."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2000
Re the "Muriel's Wedding" story ("A Great Reception," by Kathleen Craughwell, April 5): It's interesting to note a couple of other Aussie films that introduced American audiences to Australian actors now working in U.S. films. "The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert" (1994) was something of a cult hit over here and co-starred Guy Pearce ("L.A. Confidential") and Hugo Weaving ("The Matrix"), not to mention re-jump-starting Brit Terence Stamp's career. Also of note is 1992's "Proof," which starred Hugo Weaving and, in a supporting role, Russell Crowe.
NEWS
July 14, 1996 | Peter Rainer
This pleasantly twisted 1991 film marks a sharp and self-confident debut for Australian writer-director Jocelyn Moorhouse. Hugo Weaving (pictured, with Genevieve Picot) stars a a blind but passionate photographer, Picot as his acerbic housekeeper and Russell Crowe as a cheerful dishwasher, whom the photographer tentatively befriends. (Bravo Wednesday at 8:05 p.m. and Thursday at 11 a.m.)
NEWS
September 22, 1996 | Kenneth Turan
The comic pizazz of Stephan Elliott's popular 1994 film about drag performers trekking across the Australian desert certainly has an addictive quality to it. It's definitely at its best when its trio of performers--Hugo Weaving, Guy Pearce and Oscar-nominated Terence Stamp (pictured)--are out there with a lip-synched song in their hearts. Stamp is the film's major surprise, gracefully convincing as a transsexual with enough hauteur for an entire royal family (TMC Thursday at 7:15 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2002
Although single-location movies rarely hit it big at the box office, they've always been popular with actors hungry for meaty scenes. Humphrey Bogart got his big break in "The Petrified Forest," the 1936 hostage drama (based on a play) set in a desert roadside diner. Barbara Stanwyck earned an Oscar as a bedridden invalid in the 1947 noir "Sorry, Wrong Number." The Oscar-nominated courtroom drama "12 Angry Men" (1957) offered juicy turns for Henry Fonda and Lee J. Cobb as conflicted jurors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1993 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you ever hungered to see a close-up of pop star Phil Collins laughing maniacally with his mouth full of chewy hamburger, then "Frauds" (at the Sunset 5) is the in-your-face movie for you. This exercise in overstylized zaniness has enough wide-angle mug shots to populate a whole apartment building's worth of peepholes. What we're peeping at here is a self-consciously oddball Australian thriller-comedy: "Double Indemnity" as remade by Tim Burton, or something unholy like that.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan
"Cloud Atlas," based on the 2004 novel by David Mitchell, tells six nested stories spanning several hundred years and three continents. Cast members including Tom Hanks, Halle Berry and Jim Broadbent play multiple interconnected roles across the centuries. 1. In 1849 in the remote South Pacific, where the slave trade is flourishing, Dr. Goose (Hanks) administers medicine of dubious value to naive traveler Adam Ewing (Jim Sturgess). Ewing's peculiar connection to a slave creates trouble aboard their ship.
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