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SCIENCE
July 26, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Human activity may account for 80% of a two-decade, several-hundred-foot increase in the height of the tropopause -- the boundary between the atmosphere's Earth-hugging lower layer and the ultraviolet radiation-absorbing middle layer, scientists reported in the July 25 issue of the journal Science.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2013 | By August Brown
After its "punk prayer" protest against Vladimir Putin in 2012, Pussy Riot was the most dangerous band in the world. The collective mixed performance art, feminism, radical politics and humor, and two of its members were banished to a Siberian gulag for punishment (a third was released on appeal). The former two, Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova,  were finally released this week. They announced, in a news conference, that after their ordeal, they will be turning their activism away from music and performances toward a more concise critique of the Russian penal system and human rights abuses.
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OPINION
December 7, 2009
Norway's environment minister called the United Nations climate negotiations starting today in Copenhagen "the most difficult talks ever embarked upon by humanity." They are also probably the most important; at stake in this gathering of 190 nations intended to draft a successor to the Kyoto Protocol are the future of human civilization and the survival of countless plant and animal species threatened by climate change. Yet even at a time when unity of purpose is crucial, global warming deniers have stepped up their dirty tricks campaign and scored their biggest victory to date.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
The politically touchy topic of climate change will be taught more deeply to students under proposed new national science standards released Tuesday. The Next Generation Science Standards, developed over the last 18 months by California and 25 other states in conjunction with several scientific organizations, represent the first national effort since 1996 to transform the way science is taught in thousands of classrooms. The multi-state consortium is proposing that students learn fewer concepts more deeply and not merely memorize facts but understand how scientists actually investigate and gather information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2000
State Sen. Ray Haynes (R-Riverside) says that God brought him to the Legislature and that God urged him to run for the U.S. Senate (Feb. 23). He also calls environmentalists "clean-air Nazis" and says global warming is hocus-pocus. On the same day "Climate Is Warming at Steep Rate, Study Says" reported that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, backed by the National Academy of Sciences, indicated that the Earth's climate is warming at an unprecedented rate. It may well be that Haynes' evangelical Christian right conservatives may one day inherit the Earth--a dead planet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2001
Re "Warming to Standards," June 11: Human-caused global warming is a myth. Human activity has an insignificant impact on climate. Solar activity and Earth forces (such as volcanoes) have a significant impact on climate. Earth has had climate changes throughout its existence, with ice ages and warming. It is only man's vanity that causes us to think we can impact the climate. Radical environmentalists are behind the Kyoto accord. These are the same socialists and anarchists who protest the World Trade Organization meetings around the world.
OPINION
July 25, 2006
Re "I want Falwell in my foxhole," Current, July 23 I am increasingly dismayed by the devaluation of scientific fact by its inclusion, by nonscientific commentators, in opinions about purely superstitious subjects. Zev Chafets derides "secular liberals" for "profoundly" believing in global warming. Then he writes about Armageddon as though the latter is more likely to occur. There is no such thing as "liberal" science. Peer-reviewed scientific method has no political party, race or religious creed and no objective but truth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
Wolves, bred by ranchers and bounty hunters a century ago to become fearful and elusive, are once again becoming the "bold and curious" animals noted in the journals of western settlers, a top wolf biologist says. Diane Boyd told the annual meeting of the Society for Conservation Biology here last week that wolves "have demonstrated an amazing adaptability to human-dominated landscapes."
NATIONAL
June 25, 2002 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Humans now consume more of the Earth's natural resources than the planet can replace, raising doubts about the long-range sustainability of modern economies, according to a new study being published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. For the last 20 years, people have been depleting natural resources, including fish, forests and arable land, at a rapid rate.
NEWS
January 8, 1999 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
For a century, experts have puzzled over what wiped out dozens of the strangest species ever to walk the Earth--from carnivorous kangaroos, giant lizards and horned tortoises the size of automobiles to burly ground sloths and shovel-nosed mammoths--at the dawn of modern time. Now University of Colorado scientists studying ancient eggshell remnants in Australia think they have discovered the answer: people careless with fire.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Patt Morrison
Well, here it is, or almost, the specter that environmental scientists warn about: that we wind up killing off the one creature that can save us as a species. The ajolote , a 9-inch-long aquatic salamander, has been swimming around the waterways of Mexico City since before there was a Mexico City, since even well before the Aztecs. And it's been a powerful symbol in the legends of ancient Mexico itself. Now that long run may be coming to an end, as the canals of Xochimilco are too polluted, too full of non-native species and too degraded to support this ancient creature.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- At the Republican National Convention last week and in at least one stump speech over the weekend, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney used climate change as a laugh line ridiculing President Obama's priorities. But in comments to the Science Debate website Tuesday as part of an online debate organized by a consortium of scientific organizations, the Republican candidate took another position, similar to the more moderate stance he struck last year, when he conceded that the planet was getting warmer.
SCIENCE
May 20, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Coral larvae, tiny hair-covered sacs of cells, can "hear" reefs and actually swim toward them, researchers report. The finding suggests that sound is far more important in underwater ecosystem development than previously thought. Further, marine biologists say, human noise pollution has the potential to block the larvae's ability to seek out nearby reefs and settle there, ultimately harming other marine life. Coral are tiny sea creatures that build the rocky, often colorful structures associated with them; these structures ring islands and can span thousands of miles.
WORLD
April 26, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
The images are heart-rending, farmers kneeling over the cracked earth that looks to be straight out of a post-apocalyptic movie, the dust swirling in the wind. But what underlies China's worst drought in nearly a century is a matter of great debate. Is it Mother Nature or human failure? Beyond the official explanation of "abnormal weather," Chinese environmentalists are pointing to deforestation, pollution, dams, overbuilding and other man-made factors. Scientists are searching for clues about why rain hasn't come in some parts of the country.
OPINION
December 7, 2009
Norway's environment minister called the United Nations climate negotiations starting today in Copenhagen "the most difficult talks ever embarked upon by humanity." They are also probably the most important; at stake in this gathering of 190 nations intended to draft a successor to the Kyoto Protocol are the future of human civilization and the survival of countless plant and animal species threatened by climate change. Yet even at a time when unity of purpose is crucial, global warming deniers have stepped up their dirty tricks campaign and scored their biggest victory to date.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Pigs were first domesticated from wild boars in the Near East and taken to Europe by early farmers, but a new genetic study shows that European farmers then domesticated local boars, which eventually supplanted the foreign animals. Migrating farmers then completed the circle, taking the European animals to the Near East, where they supplanted the first domesticates, according to a report Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- At the Republican National Convention last week and in at least one stump speech over the weekend, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney used climate change as a laugh line ridiculing President Obama's priorities. But in comments to the Science Debate website Tuesday as part of an online debate organized by a consortium of scientific organizations, the Republican candidate took another position, similar to the more moderate stance he struck last year, when he conceded that the planet was getting warmer.
SCIENCE
February 2, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
In the strongest language it has ever used, a United Nations panel says global warming is "very likely" caused by human activities and has become a runaway train that cannot be stopped. The warming of Earth and increases in sea levels "would continue for centuries ... even if greenhouse gas concentrations were to be stabilized," according to a 20-page summary of the report that was leaked to wire services. The summary of the fourth report by the U.N.'
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