Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHuman Body
IN THE NEWS

Human Body

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
April 25, 2011 | By Shara Yurkiewicz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
There was a certain ignorance I had about the body before dissecting it. Some of what I've learned was surprising, disconcerting and fascinating: • In one day, our kidneys filter 150 to 180 liters of blood. One kidney is only about the size of a computer mouse. • Even if you do not smoke, your lungs will probably end up black and speckled from what you've breathed in over a lifetime. • The aorta doesn't just serve the heart — it's the freeway of the body, running from the chest through the abdomen and down to the groin.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
May 22, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
Here's a scientific finding that may knock you off your feet: At least 80 types of fungi reside on a typical person's heel, along with 60 between the toes and 40 on the toenail. Altogether, the feet are home to more than 100 types of fungus, more than any other area of the human body, according to a study published Wednesday by the journal Nature. And that fungal fellowship is in constant motion as we walk through life. It may sound icky, but many of the fungi on our skin serve a very useful purpose, said study leader Julie Segre, a geneticist at the National Human Genome Research Institute in Bethesda, Md. "One of the major functions of healthy fungi is to prevent pathogenic fungi from adhering to our skin," where they can cause athlete's foot, plantar warts and stubborn toenail infections, she said.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
There has been lots of excitement this week as a horde of scientists released their first looks at the trillions of microbes that live in (or on) our bodies. As well as the two main papers published in Nature, a slate of reports was published in other journals, containing all kinds of tidbits. One week earlier, another slate of “microbiome” papers was published in the journal Science. We already covered the nuts and bolts of the Human Micriobiome Project report.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
The results are in from Felix Baumgartner's record-setting leap from a capsule floating more than 24 miles above a barren New Mexico desert, and it turns out he went faster during his supersonic free fall than originally estimated. With more than 8 million computers and other digital devices tuned in Oct. 14 to the live stream on YouTube, Baumgartner reached 843.6 mph, or 1.25 times the speed of sound. Previous estimates said he hit speeds of nearly 834 mph. Either way, he was the first free-falling human to crack the sound barrier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1997
When ancient Egyptians made mummies, they took all the internal organs out of the body except the heart, which they believed was the seat of intelligence. Later, people came to see the heart as a symbol of love. But doctors know of the heart as a tireless worker that beats more than 2 1/2 billion times without resting in the average lifetime. This is only one of the amazing things our body does. Want a quick way to get to these great sites?
BUSINESS
January 25, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
Plastination of human bodies is an expensive and time-consuming process, according to the Institute of Plastination, a German firm that operates the human anatomy exhibitor Body Worlds. When a body is put through the process, decomposition of the tissue is first stopped by formaldehyde or by freezing. The cadaver is then either dissected or sawed into slices, depending on how it will be preserved. Frozen body fluids are replaced by acetone in a frigid (13 degrees below zero) acetone bath.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1999 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Learning Channel's new documentary on the human body, "The Ultimate Universe," begins with a stunning visual trope. The camera pans across a human chain of being, composed of dozens of naked people standing shoulder to shoulder, each person a year older than the one before, from birth to dotage: Squirming, squalling, shy, bold, firm, fat, pubescent, pregnant, pendulous, bald, muscular, flabby, round, short, tall and senescent.
NEWS
July 25, 1992 | KATHY SAWYER, THE WASHINGTON POST
A space biology mission flown last year aboard the shuttle Columbia, which used astronauts as guinea pigs, has revealed unexpectedly dramatic effects of weightlessness on the human body, researchers reported Friday. The effects included a severe loss of muscle tissue, blood-pressure irregularities and reduced ability to burn stored fat for energy.
NEWS
September 16, 1993 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just where does that banana go after you moosh it up in your mouth and swallow it? And what the heck is a gall bladder? The inquiring minds of children want to know. At least that's what the Gull Wings Children's Museum is banking on. The Oxnard museum is bringing in a giant doll named Stuffee to provide the answers. The portly, blue-haired 5-foot doll has a zipper down his front, and hidden inside are 10 anatomically correct organs--all made of cloth and stuffed with fiberfill.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Jimmy Hoffa -- the legendary labor leader -- is still missing, authorities said Tuesday after tests failed to detect any human remains in a sample dug up from a suburban Detroit driveway. The negative results mean that Hoffa's final resting place still ranks with such notable mysteries as the whereabouts of aviator Amelia Earhart and the disappearance of Judge Joseph Force Crater . All have become fodder for theorists seeking to resolve unexplained endings. Scientists at Michigan State University recently tested two samples cored from the ground beneath a driveway in Roseville, Mich., as part of an investigation prompted by a tip from an unidentified man who said he thought he saw a body being buried beneath a driveway years ago. The tests came back negative, according to police.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
A man who purchased the contents of a Florida storage locker made a grisly discovery when he found a batch of crudely preserved human organs inside, including hearts, brains and lungs. One heart was reportedly found in a 32-ounce drink cup filled with formaldehyde. Pensacola police are still trying to determine the source of the organs, locate survivors and figure out why the owner -- a former medical examiner -- had them. They're also trying to assess whether any laws were broken in the disposal of the human remains.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
There has been lots of excitement this week as a horde of scientists released their first looks at the trillions of microbes that live in (or on) our bodies. As well as the two main papers published in Nature, a slate of reports was published in other journals, containing all kinds of tidbits. One week earlier, another slate of “microbiome” papers was published in the journal Science. We already covered the nuts and bolts of the Human Micriobiome Project report.
SCIENCE
June 13, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
After five years of toil, a consortium of several hundred U.S. researchers has released a detailed census of the myriad bacteria, yeasts, viruses and amoebas that live, eat, excrete, reproduce and die in or on us. Described in two papers in Nature and a raft of reports in other journals, the data released Wednesday describe microbes of the skin, saliva, nostrils, guts and other areas of 242 adults in tiptop health. The $170-million, federally funded Human Microbiome Project also cataloged the genes contained within this zoo of life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2011 | By Michael Phillips
The slippery, effective new version of "The Thing" serves as a prequel to the 1982 John Carpenter film, explaining what went down, down in Antarctica, after the intergalactic thing thawed and began eviscerating humans plus a Husky or two. Those disinclined toward Carpenter's version, as I am, may be surprised at how the new release nearly matches the gore levels and the fright reached in an earlier, nondigital era of practical special effects. Yet this latest "Thing" doesn't feel like one long autopsy the way Carpenter's film (which may as well have been called "Blech")
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
We're so down for watching reality TV medical shows. Give us a half-ton man or some guy whose hands resemble trees and we're a happy clam. So we were thrilled when our editor passed along a link to a series of British shows called "Embarrassing Bodies. " With a title like that, you can only imagine. Before you click the link and watch the video clips, be forewarned: There are graphic images -- albeit in a medical context -- some of which are much more explicit than what we're used to seeing in the U.S. The show is pretty much what you'd imagine: People with embarrassing health issues seek treatment.
BOOKS
January 13, 2008 | Jesse Cohen, Jesse Cohen is the series editor of "The Best American Science Writing."
THE study of anatomy is messy -- blood, bodily fluids, internal organs and assorted other gruesomeness. As someone who can barely make it through an episode of "House" without clamping my eyes shut, I would not have lasted long as a medical student; once that inaugural cadaver was unveiled, I would have been out the door before the first fainter hit the deck.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1992 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A strange yet powerful mix of spectacle and quiet contemplativeness govern British sculptor Antony Gormley's mini-retrospective at the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. From the life-size lead figure 10 feet up, extended outward from the gallery wall as if readied to take a perfect dive, to the two-room-sized installation of 35,000 terra-cotta figurines in the museum's lower galleries, Gormley has created the sense that something big is going to happen.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Roy Wallack, Special to the Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
To what extremes can the human body be pushed? Ask ultramarathoner Marshall Ulrich in a live Web chat on Monday, May 16 at 11 a.m. Pacific time (1 p.m. CT, 2 p.m. ET). Ulrich ran 3,063.2 miles across the U.S., crossed Death Valley on foot a record 22 times and won the Badwater Ultramarathon four times. He's also the author of "Running on Empty: An Ultramarathoner's Story of Love, Loss, and a Record-Setting Run Across America. " How did running across America from coast to coast in 52 days -- the third-fastest crossing of all time and the fastest by anyone over 40 years old -- compare to the other ultra-extreme events he's done, such as running the 135-mile Badwater Ultramarathon in 125-degree heat?
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Researchers at the National Hansen's Disease Program in Baton Rouge, La. -- a federal government program that studies leprosy and treats 3,600 Americans with the disease -- announced Wednesday that they had figured out the source of some mysterious cases of the illness in the Southern United States.   Patients got leprosy from contact with wild armadillos. The team's study, which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine , used cutting-edge genetic techniques to look for similarities in strains of the disease infecting armadillos and people in the region.  It found striking similarities, concluding that the data strongly implicated armadillos as a source of human infection.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|