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Human Body

NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By Tami Dennis, Tribune Health
If a full moon affects the human body, then a supermoon surely would send those effects into overdrive, leading to even more pregnancies, epileptic seizures, surgery screw-ups, suicides, assaults and various other types of biological havoc. Surely, it would. The operative word, of course, is "if. " And the Skeptic's Dictionary begins a nice distillation of moon-related folklore this way: "The full moon has been linked to crime, suicide, mental illness, disasters, accidents,  birthrates, fertility, and werewolves, among other things.
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NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
We're so down for watching reality TV medical shows. Give us a half-ton man or some guy whose hands resemble trees and we're a happy clam. So we were thrilled when our editor passed along a link to a series of British shows called "Embarrassing Bodies. " With a title like that, you can only imagine. Before you click the link and watch the video clips, be forewarned: There are graphic images -- albeit in a medical context -- some of which are much more explicit than what we're used to seeing in the U.S. The show is pretty much what you'd imagine: People with embarrassing health issues seek treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2011 | By Michael Phillips
The slippery, effective new version of "The Thing" serves as a prequel to the 1982 John Carpenter film, explaining what went down, down in Antarctica, after the intergalactic thing thawed and began eviscerating humans plus a Husky or two. Those disinclined toward Carpenter's version, as I am, may be surprised at how the new release nearly matches the gore levels and the fright reached in an earlier, nondigital era of practical special effects. Yet this latest "Thing" doesn't feel like one long autopsy the way Carpenter's film (which may as well have been called "Blech")
BUSINESS
December 25, 1993 | Associated Press
At BareBones, a novelty shop at Minnesota's Mall of America with a focus on the human body, this season's hot items included eyeballs and a book on poop, said Robin Savage, assistant manager at the store. The wobbling eyeballs for $2.95 were winners with BareBones customers. "They're little plastic balls, and inside there's a weighted eye, so when you roll it on the floor the eye always stays up." The shop started with an inventory of 5,000 and sold out in mid-December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1996 | SARAH KLEIN
Carol Goldmark has been painting since she was a child and teaching art since she was 13. For years, she said, her favorite theme was flowers. But after being severely injured in a freeway collision, she found a new subject: the human body. After a painful 10-week recovery at UCI Medical Center, she recalled, she realized that her interest in flowers was related to their rapid progression from life to death. Like the human body, she said, "they wrinkle, dry and fall away as they get older.
NEWS
June 30, 1995 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for The Times
The human body has always been one of the great subjects of art. In one sense, there can be nothing new in contemporary renderings of the figure. And yet, today's figurative artists still have particular stories to tell through the form. In the Mythos gallery show "Bodies in Motion," photographs by Michael Philip Manheim share the theme of movement with Shanna Galloway's paintings and drawings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2001 | SUNIL DUTTA, Sunil Dutta is an officer in the LAPD's West Valley Division
American culture is obsessed with youth. The message on commercials and advertisements is inescapable: Young is beautiful, being old is a disease. Scientists consistently promise us that their research will reverse aging. Pharmaceuticals furnish us with pills and creams to remove wrinkles. We love the smooth and flexible skin of teenage bodies; we crave the strong muscles and high energy of youth.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Roy Wallack, Special to the Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
To what extremes can the human body be pushed? Ask ultramarathoner Marshall Ulrich in a live Web chat on Monday, May 16 at 11 a.m. Pacific time (1 p.m. CT, 2 p.m. ET). Ulrich ran 3,063.2 miles across the U.S., crossed Death Valley on foot a record 22 times and won the Badwater Ultramarathon four times. He's also the author of "Running on Empty: An Ultramarathoner's Story of Love, Loss, and a Record-Setting Run Across America. " How did running across America from coast to coast in 52 days -- the third-fastest crossing of all time and the fastest by anyone over 40 years old -- compare to the other ultra-extreme events he's done, such as running the 135-mile Badwater Ultramarathon in 125-degree heat?
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Researchers at the National Hansen's Disease Program in Baton Rouge, La. -- a federal government program that studies leprosy and treats 3,600 Americans with the disease -- announced Wednesday that they had figured out the source of some mysterious cases of the illness in the Southern United States.   Patients got leprosy from contact with wild armadillos. The team's study, which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine , used cutting-edge genetic techniques to look for similarities in strains of the disease infecting armadillos and people in the region.  It found striking similarities, concluding that the data strongly implicated armadillos as a source of human infection.
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