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Human Body

BUSINESS
December 1, 1997 | DAVID PESCOVITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the latest life-imitates-art development from the biotechnology industry, a La Jolla company has begun selling organic human body parts. The first product from Advanced Tissue Sciences is skin grown in a laboratory from a baby's foreskin. At $400 for a 2-by-3-inch piece, it's expensive. But it's worth every penny if you're suffering from severe burns or if you're suffering from a diabetic foot ulcer that won't heal and could require amputation.
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NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By Tami Dennis, Tribune Health
If a full moon affects the human body, then a supermoon surely would send those effects into overdrive, leading to even more pregnancies, epileptic seizures, surgery screw-ups, suicides, assaults and various other types of biological havoc. Surely, it would. The operative word, of course, is "if. " And the Skeptic's Dictionary begins a nice distillation of moon-related folklore this way: "The full moon has been linked to crime, suicide, mental illness, disasters, accidents,  birthrates, fertility, and werewolves, among other things.
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
We're so down for watching reality TV medical shows. Give us a half-ton man or some guy whose hands resemble trees and we're a happy clam. So we were thrilled when our editor passed along a link to a series of British shows called "Embarrassing Bodies. " With a title like that, you can only imagine. Before you click the link and watch the video clips, be forewarned: There are graphic images -- albeit in a medical context -- some of which are much more explicit than what we're used to seeing in the U.S. The show is pretty much what you'd imagine: People with embarrassing health issues seek treatment.
HEALTH
July 19, 2010
Thank you for publishing the article "Too Much Milk?" (July 12). As a longtime vegetarian and someone who recently went vegan, I felt compelled to weigh in on the issue. Humans are the only living beings who drink the milk of another species, and despite popular belief, our bodies have no need for it. Cow's milk provides the necessary nutrients for calves. The human body has no need for these nutrients. Fortunately, there are so many great nondairy milks out there that making the healthier and more compassionate choice is easier than ever.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1993 | Associated Press
At BareBones, a novelty shop at Minnesota's Mall of America with a focus on the human body, this season's hot items included eyeballs and a book on poop, said Robin Savage, assistant manager at the store. The wobbling eyeballs for $2.95 were winners with BareBones customers. "They're little plastic balls, and inside there's a weighted eye, so when you roll it on the floor the eye always stays up." The shop started with an inventory of 5,000 and sold out in mid-December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1996 | SARAH KLEIN
Carol Goldmark has been painting since she was a child and teaching art since she was 13. For years, she said, her favorite theme was flowers. But after being severely injured in a freeway collision, she found a new subject: the human body. After a painful 10-week recovery at UCI Medical Center, she recalled, she realized that her interest in flowers was related to their rapid progression from life to death. Like the human body, she said, "they wrinkle, dry and fall away as they get older.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2001 | SUNIL DUTTA, Sunil Dutta is an officer in the LAPD's West Valley Division
American culture is obsessed with youth. The message on commercials and advertisements is inescapable: Young is beautiful, being old is a disease. Scientists consistently promise us that their research will reverse aging. Pharmaceuticals furnish us with pills and creams to remove wrinkles. We love the smooth and flexible skin of teenage bodies; we crave the strong muscles and high energy of youth.
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Researchers at the National Hansen's Disease Program in Baton Rouge, La. -- a federal government program that studies leprosy and treats 3,600 Americans with the disease -- announced Wednesday that they had figured out the source of some mysterious cases of the illness in the Southern United States.   Patients got leprosy from contact with wild armadillos. The team's study, which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine , used cutting-edge genetic techniques to look for similarities in strains of the disease infecting armadillos and people in the region.  It found striking similarities, concluding that the data strongly implicated armadillos as a source of human infection.
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