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Human Body

NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By Tami Dennis, Tribune Health
If a full moon affects the human body, then a supermoon surely would send those effects into overdrive, leading to even more pregnancies, epileptic seizures, surgery screw-ups, suicides, assaults and various other types of biological havoc. Surely, it would. The operative word, of course, is "if. " And the Skeptic's Dictionary begins a nice distillation of moon-related folklore this way: "The full moon has been linked to crime, suicide, mental illness, disasters, accidents,  birthrates, fertility, and werewolves, among other things.
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NATIONAL
October 2, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Jimmy Hoffa -- the legendary labor leader -- is still missing, authorities said Tuesday after tests failed to detect any human remains in a sample dug up from a suburban Detroit driveway. The negative results mean that Hoffa's final resting place still ranks with such notable mysteries as the whereabouts of aviator Amelia Earhart and the disappearance of Judge Joseph Force Crater . All have become fodder for theorists seeking to resolve unexplained endings. Scientists at Michigan State University recently tested two samples cored from the ground beneath a driveway in Roseville, Mich., as part of an investigation prompted by a tip from an unidentified man who said he thought he saw a body being buried beneath a driveway years ago. The tests came back negative, according to police.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1993 | Associated Press
At BareBones, a novelty shop at Minnesota's Mall of America with a focus on the human body, this season's hot items included eyeballs and a book on poop, said Robin Savage, assistant manager at the store. The wobbling eyeballs for $2.95 were winners with BareBones customers. "They're little plastic balls, and inside there's a weighted eye, so when you roll it on the floor the eye always stays up." The shop started with an inventory of 5,000 and sold out in mid-December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1996 | SARAH KLEIN
Carol Goldmark has been painting since she was a child and teaching art since she was 13. For years, she said, her favorite theme was flowers. But after being severely injured in a freeway collision, she found a new subject: the human body. After a painful 10-week recovery at UCI Medical Center, she recalled, she realized that her interest in flowers was related to their rapid progression from life to death. Like the human body, she said, "they wrinkle, dry and fall away as they get older.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2001 | SUNIL DUTTA, Sunil Dutta is an officer in the LAPD's West Valley Division
American culture is obsessed with youth. The message on commercials and advertisements is inescapable: Young is beautiful, being old is a disease. Scientists consistently promise us that their research will reverse aging. Pharmaceuticals furnish us with pills and creams to remove wrinkles. We love the smooth and flexible skin of teenage bodies; we crave the strong muscles and high energy of youth.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Roy Wallack, Special to the Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
To what extremes can the human body be pushed? Ask ultramarathoner Marshall Ulrich in a live Web chat on Monday, May 16 at 11 a.m. Pacific time (1 p.m. CT, 2 p.m. ET). Ulrich ran 3,063.2 miles across the U.S., crossed Death Valley on foot a record 22 times and won the Badwater Ultramarathon four times. He's also the author of "Running on Empty: An Ultramarathoner's Story of Love, Loss, and a Record-Setting Run Across America. " How did running across America from coast to coast in 52 days -- the third-fastest crossing of all time and the fastest by anyone over 40 years old -- compare to the other ultra-extreme events he's done, such as running the 135-mile Badwater Ultramarathon in 125-degree heat?
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
We're so down for watching reality TV medical shows. Give us a half-ton man or some guy whose hands resemble trees and we're a happy clam. So we were thrilled when our editor passed along a link to a series of British shows called "Embarrassing Bodies. " With a title like that, you can only imagine. Before you click the link and watch the video clips, be forewarned: There are graphic images -- albeit in a medical context -- some of which are much more explicit than what we're used to seeing in the U.S. The show is pretty much what you'd imagine: People with embarrassing health issues seek treatment.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | Reuters
A Florida jury Friday found a former funeral home director guilty of abusing a human body after she cut the hand from a corpse as part of a voodoo ritual. The Manatee County Circuit Court jury of three men and three women convicted Paula Albritton, 45, after a three-day trial. Her son, Jimmie Clark, 23, pleaded no contest to the same charge last year and is serving a one-year sentence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1988 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
Chemists have invented a molecule that can selectively latch onto barbiturates, raising the hope that the artificial receptors may be used to detoxify people who have taken overdoses. "It is envisioned that these molecules would course through the blood, selectively sponging up and inactivating barbiturates before the drugs could reach their natural sites of action in the body," said a spokesman for the American Chemical Society. Princeton University chemistry professor Andrew D.
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